Fronteras

4:57pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Health, Science, Environment

NAFTA's environmental impact on Tijuana 20 years later

The government confined, sealed off and buried the contamination deep underground, then put basketball courts on top because more intense construction on the site would risk digging up toxic materials.
Adrian Florido

When the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed 20 years ago, one of the big concerns was how the treaty would impact the environment.

After NAFTA was signed, eastern Tijuana experienced a building frenzy. One industrial park after another sprung up to accommodate the hundreds of American factories that came here in search of cheap labor.

Magdalena Cerda is an environmental activist, and she’s brought me to the edge of one of those sprawling complexes, to some barren, empty concrete basketball courts.

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4:22pm

Mon June 18, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

As need for court interpreters grows, who pays?

Jude Joffe-Block

Like many of the people waiting to turn in paperwork at Clark County’s family court, truck driver Ruben Vargas is here because of a custody battle. Whenever his ex doesn’t let him see their 6-year-old boy, he takes her to court.

But since Vargas only speaks Spanish, he’s had to pay for his own interpreter every time.

“I didn’t expect that I would have to pay,” Vargas said. “I thought it would be free. I thought there were people in the court to help people. But there isn’t.”

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2:12pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

Growing language needs are a challenge for Nevada justice system

Carol Partiguian is the only staff Spanish interpreter for the Clark County public defender office. Budget cuts have prevented the office from hiring more interpreters despite a growing caseload of Spanish-speaking clients.
By Jude Joffe-Block

On a recent afternoon, Carol Partiguian rushed over to an appointment at the Clark County jail downtown. She the only Spanish language interpreter in the county public defender’s office, which means she is usually in a hurry.

“With a hundred-plus attorneys that we have in the office, it is very hard for one person to be able to help everybody,” Partiguian said.

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4:22pm

Tue April 24, 2012
Politics

American-born children struggle to adapt in rural Guatemalan town

The issues of birthright citizenship, and so-called anchor babies, have a way of flaring tempers. For now, anyway, the children of illegal immigrants born in this country are allowed to live here with the same rights as any other citizen, assuming they were born in this country. But it often happens that the children don’t live here once their parents are caught and sent home. In a joint report from the Fronteras public radio project, Peter O’Dowd and Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez visited a small town in Guatemala, where more than a dozen American children live.

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