gentrification

Teetering on the edge of San Francisco's development boom

Jul 13, 2017
Claire Stremple

 

It seems as though you can’t look up at the sky without seeing the long neck of a construction crane.

Your Call: Can nonprofits survive the real estate crisis?

Jun 29, 2017
photo by flickr user Eric Richardson

  

In an increasingly tough real estate market, how can vital community based organizations survive?

 

Photo by Bill Joyce

Most artists follow their visions in the privacy of their studios, but one Oakland artist is re-defining public space: a park. Laila Espinoza is a community artist — one whose art touches larger social themes while engaging the surrounding community. She does all this at Athol Plaza Park in Oakland nearly every weekend.

Liza Veale

 

Eva Castillo* thinks of herself as a strong person. She was raised in the Sunnydale projects in San Francisco, sharing a bedroom with three brothers. Now, she works construction — often as the only woman on the job. But when she was evicted, she says she felt truly helpless for the first time in her life.

Liza Veale

In order to stem the tide of displacement in places like the Bay Area, some advocates want to strengthen tenant protections at the state level. One way to do that would be to modify or repeal the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act.

Liza Veale

 

Though we’re all understandably consumed by the news at the national level, the last election also came with consequences for the Bay Area locally—especially for the region’s ongoing housing crisis.

Pumping up bodies and spirits at God's Gym

Nov 29, 2016

The training floor of God’s Gym is definitely old school – one room crammed with barbells, benches, and ancient weight machines.

Snitow-Kaufman Productions

  

On the October 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about Company Town, a new documentary that tells the story of a local election campaign and political decisions that will determine the future of San Francisco.

Courtesy of the Oakland Museum of California, resized and recropped

A new exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California is trying to address gentrification, one of the Bay Area’s biggest hot button issues, through a broad range of work from West Oakland residents—from school kids to aerosol muralists to documentary filmmakers—who share their own thoughts.

 

Glass King, a recycling center in West Oakland that's a source of income and safety net for roughly 400 daily walk-up recyclers, is set to close on August 20th. That is, unless supporters of the center successfully petition the city to withdraw its orders to shut the center down.

Daily news roundup for Monday, July 25, 2016

Jul 25, 2016

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

Bay Area table tennis phenom is youngest U.S. Olympian // SFGate

"Kanak Jha doesn’t mind social pingpong. He was willing to volley a bit on Thursday with a reporter who is a decent garage player for 10 shots. But on the 11th, Jha put so much slice and speed on the ball that you could snap your wrist trying to return it.

Daily news roundup for Monday, June 6, 2016

Jun 6, 2016
Image by Flickr user Roco. Used under CC / cropped and resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

It was Draymond Green’s night // San Francisco Chronicle

"It was Draymond Green’s night. Pure and simple.

"The Warriors’ boisterous forward led his team to a thorough 110-77 dismantling of the Cavs in Game 2 of the NBA Finals on Sunday night, showing off all the various skills that make him one of the best to play the game."

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Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 24, 2016

May 24, 2016
By Flickr user Alejandro Lavin, Jr. / used under CC license / resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Acting SF police chief meets with Bayview community leaders // SF Gate

“Acting San Francisco police Chief Toney Chaplin faced tough questioning by Bayview community leaders Monday evening where residents asked for answers in last week’s officer-involved shooting that led to former Chief Greg Suhr’s resignation.

 

In Oakland, just past Jack London Square, there’s a zone along the water that’s a little wild. It’s past the new condos and great restaurants, past the wholesale produce warehouses that open for business before dawn, and down the channel from Lake Merritt’s newly landscaped park. It’s an in-between space. But change is coming from both sides.

 

Photo cropped and resized with permission from Dan Brekke

 

On Thursday April 7th, 2016, San Francisco police shot and killed Luis Gongora, a 45-year-old man living in a homeless encampment of tents on Shotwell Street in the Mission District.

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 11, 2016

Apr 11, 2016
"Warriors Blimp 2" by Flickr user Ardail Smith. Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 / cropped and resized

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news:

Warriors tie Bulls' mark with 72nd Win // East Bay Times

Image courtesy Thompson Dorfman

 

 

For decades, development investors didn’t want to touch Oakland. In 1997, one economist called the city an “ugly duckling in a bay of swans.” But these days, Oakland is one of the “hottest,” or fastest-growing, real estate markets in the country.

 

 

In the Bay Area, one strategy for dealing with the housing shortage is to try to build ourselves out. But brand new housing can be too expensive for middle- and working-class people to move into. In San Francisco, it now costs $700,000-800,000 to build a new unit. That’s forced many developers in the area to ask if there is a way to build more quickly and for less money. There is. It’s the same way we build anything more efficiently—by using factories.

This American Life: Poetry of Propaganda

Mar 8, 2016
"San Francisco Houses," by Tom Donald/Used under CC license/Resized and cropped

What happens when children take on the subject of gentrification with a musical?

Illustration by David Boyer.

THE INTERSECTION looks at change in the Bay Area through physical intersections and street corners — where different cultures, desires and histories meet every day. 

Laura Flynn

On the January 21st edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss ways to preserve arts and culture in the Bay Area. 

Courtesy of Bert Johnson/East Bay Express

Nextdoor.com is a website designed to bring neighbors together by helping them ask questions, get to know each other, and post local recommendations.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Nov 24, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:           

Richmond: Developer wants residents, not city, to decide on housing project // Contra Costa Times

“A prominent Richmond developer who has failed to get city support for his latest housing project wants residents to decide the matter through a ballot measure next year.”

Punk still rocks at Thrillhouse

Nov 17, 2015
"Songs for Moms 1/9/10" by flickr user sgtpepper. Used under CC / Resized and cropped / bit.ly/1MlazFN

The Bay Area has a rich history of live music. Places like the Fillmore and the Warfield in San Francisco, or the Fox in Oakland. 

San Francisco Planning Department / resized and cropped.

San Francisco's lead housing policy planner Kearstin Dischinger speaks with KALW's Ben Trefny about the proposed Affordable Housing Bonus Program.

Eva Royale / Resized.

 

 

There isn’t much in the backyard of Eva Royale’s house. Two white metal patio chairs, her grandsons’ toy cars. What stands out most is her beloved 44-year-old cactus collection.

 

Leila Day

In the past few months, one particular issue has become a flashpoint around gentrification in Oakland: noise.  

The art festival that aimed to change San Francisco

Nov 10, 2015
Resized and Cropped.
Courtesy of La Principessa Errante 365.

 

Imagine if San Francisco’s Tenderloin and Mid-Market area were filled with artists: storefronts overflowing with creative expression; staged performances in public places; a free cafe.

Daily news roundup for Monday, August 31, 2015

Aug 31, 2015
Gabrielle Lurie, Special To The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California Death Penalty, Struck Down Over Delays, Faces Next Test // The New York Times

"Whether California’s application of the death penalty is so drawn out and arbitrary that it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment will be argued on Monday before a federal appeals court in Pasadena."

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