health

Pumping up bodies and spirits at God's Gym

Nov 29, 2016

The training floor of God’s Gym is definitely old school – one room crammed with barbells, benches, and ancient weight machines.

Is Prop 61 the answer to rising drug prices?

Sep 27, 2016

Maybe you’ve seen the billboards for Prop 61, with AARP and the California Nurses Association urging you to “Vote Yes for Lower Drug Prices.” Or the scary TV commercials warning you to vote no on Prop 61, arguing that drug prices will go up if it’s passed.

Courtesy of Julie Norem/cropped for size

Why is everyone so gung ho on having an optimistic attitude?

courtesy of Diana O'Brien

Conversations about Autism are often focused on what people can't do.

A long wait for a new Bayview market

Aug 17, 2016

For Bayview residents, stocking the kitchen with fresh produce, meats, staples and spices means having to go to several places to get what they need. There is no full service grocery store here, so people have to plan, travel, and get creative. 

 

Being homeless means it's a daily challenge to get your basic needs met: eating, bathing and using the bathroom. For many women, one extra challenge arises every month when they get their period. 

Tim Hussin

 

 

Talking to peers can be a vital tool for making it through dark times. But what happens when your friends and loved ones aren’t around anymore? That’s the situation for many older gay men in San Francisco, whose community was decimated by the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s.

What's all that screen time doing to our childrens' brains? 

Six years ago, today, the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as "Obama Care," was signed into law. The goal was to make health care accessible to all Americans, and to eliminate disparities based on income, education, gender and race. 

 

How could science help us understand our own happiness?

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Mar 16, 2016

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Bay Area reservoirs still far from full: Conservation experts hope that drought lessons last // San Mateo Daily Journal

Neonatal medical care has grown tremendously in the last 30 years. Just recently there’s been a change in the treatment we give to babies born prematurely. More and more, parents — not doctors — are making decisions about treatment. Reporter Jenny Gold has the story.

On the September 24th edition of Your Call, author and doctor Damon Tweedy joins us to talk about his new book, Black Man in a White Coat. 

accesshiv.org

We've come a long way since the first diagnosis of HIV in 1981, but the epidemic is not over. San Francisco is indelibly marked by the epidemic, which reached its height in 80's and 90's, but what is going on now? Dr. Susan Buchbinder is director of Bridge HIV, a San Francisco Department of Public Health HIV prevention research program, and she’s on the steering committee for Getting to Zero San Francisco, an initiative that aims to reduce deaths, new infections, and stigma.

 

 

The Black Sheep

Jun 23, 2015

 

The next time you're in San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, if you look carefully you’ll see a symbol of this support: a black cross drawn in marker. It’s the coat of arms for the Black Sheep, the area’s unofficial homeless first aid squad.

 

Five years after the BP oil spill, what do we know about the long-term effects? On the April 16th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.  Oil and methane gas spewed into the ocean for 87 straight days. The U.S. government estimates over 4 million barrels of oil spilled into the Gulf. Recovery teams collected only 17 percent. Where is all of that oil? Five years later, what do we know and what don’t we know? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

 

Oliver Jacobson started playing violin when he was six years old. At 18, he enrolled at Berklee College of Music, one of the top music schools in the country. Back then, he wanted to be a star. But he had a sense he might be able to use his talent for something more.

“I was in the practice rooms for four hours a day,” he says, “trying to be the best jazz violinist I could be, and just feeling kind of hollow in that.”

Under CC license from Flickr user TedsBlog

There’s a plan circulating in San Francisco to make using crack cocaine safer: give away free crack pipes. It might sound farfetched, but it’s supported by science.

The Central Valley, a large swatch of California between the coast and the Sierra mountains, was until recently, in a state of emergency. The region was in a long drought. The recession didn’t help. People were hungry.

Do young "invincibles" need health insurance?

Mar 6, 2014

From our partners at Youth Radio.

StoryCorps: Overcoming mental illness together

Feb 19, 2014
San Francisco StoryCorps


Candy flavors put e-cigarettes on kid's menu

Feb 19, 2014

From our partners at Youth Radio.

Reporter’s Notebook: My uncle’s battle with HIV

Feb 4, 2014

When I was eight years old, I rode on one of Mexico’s passenger trains from Mexicali to Guadalajara with my uncle, David. All summer, we visited towns and family throughout the country, learning more and more about our heritage and each other. At the time, I had only heard of him through the occasional family story, so I was unaware of my uncle’s estrangement from our family. I’m not sure what the circumstances were that allowed us to travel together, but I’m grateful for them. I was able to spend a summer on an unforgettable adventure with an uncle that I wouldn’t see again.

Youth Radio: What teens are eating outside the home

Jan 15, 2014

From our partners at Youth Radio.

Out In The Bay 10914 Lesbian Health Issues

Jan 9, 2014

Lesbian Health Issues.

Eating Well for Health and Longevity.
Guest:  Rebecca Katz, Masters of Science degree in Health and Nutrition Education, Executive Chef of the Annual "Food as Medicine" Training Program at The Center for Mind-Body Medicine, Georgetown Medical School; Ms. Katz is author of THE LONGEVITY KITCHEN and THE CANCER-FIGHTING KITCHEN.
Listeners with questions or comments for Chuck and his guest, please call 415-841-4134.

StoryCorps

Tiffany Camhi

Soup kitchens in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District feed thousands of homeless and low-income people every day. These free meal sites serve as a vital source of food -- for some, it’s their only meal of the day.

Your Legal Rights considers the dangers of excess sugar causing obesity in the American diet.

Guest:  Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist and Director of the UCSF Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health Program.


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