Health, Science, Environment

Health, science, and environment news

On this edition Your Call’s One Planet Series, journalist Carey Gillam joins us to discuss her new book Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science.

Flu season hits the Bay Area hard

Jan 31, 2018

The flu season is here, and it’s really felt like a nasty one. 

Courtesy of UCSF

 

Babies being born early is the No. 1 cause of infant mortality in the United States. After years of decline, it’s back on the rise, particularly for Black women. Now mothers around the Bay Area are demanding solutions.

 

CC Flickr user Evelyn, resized and recropped

 

Thousands of babies are born at Stanford Children's hospital each year, and most of them go home with their parents. But for some families, the joy of giving birth becomes a nightmare.

Courtesy of UCSF

Elizabeth Rogers is the Associate Clinical Director of the Intensive Care Nursery of the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. KALW’s Ben Trefny sat down with her to hear more about what technologies and medical techniques are being used to save the most vulnerable premature babies.

Click the audio player above to listen to the full story. 

Charlotte Cooper, used under Creative Commons license, via Flickr

Reproductive rights, protections against sexual assault, transgender rights, and access to healthcare are all under attack. Patients are scrambling to find care, pregnant inmates are overcrowded in jails, and women's health is suffering under budget cuts. The news site Rewire extensively documents what is happening to reproductive rights and justice. How should journalists hold legislators accountable for their attacks on women's health? 

Subhankar Banerjee

  

  

What does the Arctic tell us about climate change? On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, writer and environmental activist Subhankar Banerjee joins us to discuss the Trump administration’s plans to open nearly all US coastal waters and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling.

Mimzy via Pixabay

  

You can’t see it, but your phone and your internet connection emits non-ionizing radiation. Scientists and doctors have been debating the health and environmental effects of radiation for years.

Jordan Uhl

  

In the 45 years since the Supreme Court decided the landmark Roe v. Wade case, which legalized abortion in the United States, mostly Republicans have enacted hundreds of policies that restrict access to abortion and other reproductive care.

How has access to abortion changed in the decades since that watershed case? We’ll speak with women who are fighting for abortion access and women who remember what life was like when abortion was illegal.

Guests:

  

On the next Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll speak with Penn State professor and climatologist Michael Mann who calls the Trump administration the most anti-science and anti-environmental administration in US history.

Angela Johnston / KALW News

 

In hundreds of communities across the state, the water coming out of the tap is still not drinkable. Many of these places are small, rural, and economically disadvantaged — the bulk of them are located in the Central Valley. But the Bay Area isn’t immune, and the solutions aren’t easy.

We're marking MLK Jr. Day by discussing environmental justice with Mustafa Ali, the former head of the EPA's environmental justice program. Over the past 24 years, he's worked with hundreds of communities of color, low income communities, and indigenous populations.

Angela Johnston

A long legal battle over shipping coal out of the new Oakland export terminal is headed to trial.

Chuck Grimmett/Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Most of us don’t even think about the health effects of cannabis secondhand smoke — partly because there’s very little research being done on it.

By 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Dr. Marcus Eriksen about his new book, Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution.

On the first Your Call of 2018, we'll be joined by a panel of young environmental activists from around the Bay Area to discuss the state of the environmental movement.  How are they connecting global crises with local action? What did they accomplish in 2017 and what's at the top of their agenda for the new year?

  

The new documentary Company Town follows a group of citizens in Crossett, a small town in Arkansas, who are fighting for their lives against Georgia-Pacific, one of the nation’s largest paper mills and chemical plants, owned by the billionaire Koch brothers.

What’s being done to protect wild orangutans and other endangered wildlife? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with conservation scientist Dr. Ian Singleton about the discovery of a new orangutan species in the Indonesian forest.

Your Call: Hacking the American Mind

Dec 21, 2017

  

UCSF endocrinologist Robert Lustig is best known for his research into the addictive properties of sugar. In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind, Lustig widens his scope to look at how the food industry has fostered today’s epidemics of addiction and depression.

Angela Johnston

 

Ben Durkee is a true Trinity local. He’s lived and worked in the Northern California county his entire life.  

  

Seattle Times environmental reporter Lynda Mapes spent a year studying a century-old oak tree in Massachusetts. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Mapes about her new book, Witness Tree: Seasons of Change with a Century Old Oak.

Our Children's Trust

  

It has been a momentous week for the groundbreaking climate change lawsuit, Juliana v. United States. It was brought two years ago by 21 children and young adults against the US government for its actions that cause global warming.

What do we need to know about the relationship between birds and humans? On the next Your Call's One Planet Series, we’ll speak with New York Times writer Jim Robbins about his new book The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future.

What are the health risks of wildfire cleanup?

Dec 4, 2017
Angela Johnston

In the wake of the wildfires that devastated Sonoma and Napa counties, residents have been starting the process of cleaning up and rebuilding. The wildfires left about 250 square miles of burnt land — and not just scorched earth, but also materials that can be hazardous to people’s health.

KALW's Ninna Gaensler-Debs talks about what the cleanup process entails, and what health risks people might encounter along the way.

You can find more information about Sonoma County recovery efforts here

Angela Johnston

The sheer amount of hazardous mess left behind by the North Bay fires is unprecedented — and dangerous to the Russian River watershed. As it starts to rain, experts say any amount of precipitation will pick up toxic fire debris and transport it down storm drains.

On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with renowned architect Carl Anthony about the racial history of architecture and urban design.

  

The United States is more segregated than it was in the 1980s. Black and Latinx students are more likely to attend so-called majority-minority schools where 60 percent or more of students live in poverty.

Your Call: How to be a responsible avocado-eater

Nov 28, 2017
https://www.vallartadaily.com/living/foodies/deforestation-mexicos-avocado/ / Vallarta Daily

  

There’s a global boom in demand for avocados. In the US, demand nearly doubled between 2010 and 2015.  But supply has gone down, and prices have gone up. The pressure of this market has driven deforestation and water shortages in avocado-growing areas like Michoacan state in Mexico.  

  

During the climate conference in Bonn, Germany, delegates from nearly 200 countries worked on solutions to mitigate the impacts of climates change.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/11/13/californias-jerry-brown-how-beat-trump-climate-change/857519001/

California makes international headlines for leading the way on global climate solutions. At the climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Governor Jerry Brown championed California’s role in transitioning to renewable energy, but activists called him out for continuing to promote oil and gas extraction in the state. How fast are we moving towards true sustainability?

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