Health, Science, Environment

Health, science, and environment news


On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, internationally renowned photographer Chris Jordan joins us to talk about his new documentary Albatross, a powerful and intimate visual journey about the lives of these magnificent seabirds.


On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll mark International Women’s Day by speaking with women filmmakers who are showcasing their work at this year’s International Ocean Film Festival in San Francisco.

Portrait by Erik McGregor


On this edition of Your Call, writer, artist, and activist Sunaura Taylor discusses her new book, Beasts of Burden: Animal and Disability Liberation.


Marissa Ortega-Welch


Biologists are trying to lure herons that have been nesting in downtown Oakland to move to Lake Merritt instead. Will it work?

Photo courtesy of Rue Mapp



This story originally aired in 2014.

One of the Bay Area’s main attractions is its proximity to nature. Only 45 minutes separate Bay Area residents from arriving at the ocean, the mountains, or a hiking trail. But not everybody experiences the Bay Area’s natural beauty.

rent Davis Bailey / The California Sunday Magazine

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll discuss water in California. Award winning journalist Marx Arax has written a lengthy piece in the California Sunday Magazine about Stewart Resnick, one of most powerful farmers in the US, and the largest single water user in the Western United States.

How can we save our coral reefs?

Feb 18, 2018

What do we need to know about the unique role of coral in our ocean ecosystems? On the next Your Call's One Planet Series, we'll rebroadcast our discussion about the documentary Chasing Coral.

Sawsan Morrar


The North Bay wildfires tore through neighborhoods and hills last fall. More than 100,000 acres of wilderness in Napa and Sonoma counties were destroyed, including thousands of oak trees.


On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which protects more than 1,000 bird species from being killed or harmed.



This month we’ve experienced record-breaking weather across the state.


On this edition Your Call’s One Planet Series, journalist Carey Gillam joins us to discuss her new book Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science.

Flu season hits the Bay Area hard

Jan 31, 2018

The flu season is here, and it’s really felt like a nasty one. 

Courtesy of UCSF


Babies being born early is the No. 1 cause of infant mortality in the United States. After years of decline, it’s back on the rise, particularly for Black women. Now mothers around the Bay Area are demanding solutions.


CC Flickr user Evelyn, resized and recropped


Thousands of babies are born at Stanford Children's hospital each year, and most of them go home with their parents. But for some families, the joy of giving birth becomes a nightmare.

Courtesy of UCSF

Elizabeth Rogers is the Associate Clinical Director of the Intensive Care Nursery of the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. KALW’s Ben Trefny sat down with her to hear more about what technologies and medical techniques are being used to save the most vulnerable premature babies.

Click the audio player above to listen to the full story. 

Charlotte Cooper, used under Creative Commons license, via Flickr

Reproductive rights, protections against sexual assault, transgender rights, and access to healthcare are all under attack. Patients are scrambling to find care, pregnant inmates are overcrowded in jails, and women's health is suffering under budget cuts. The news site Rewire extensively documents what is happening to reproductive rights and justice. How should journalists hold legislators accountable for their attacks on women's health? 

Subhankar Banerjee



What does the Arctic tell us about climate change? On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, writer and environmental activist Subhankar Banerjee joins us to discuss the Trump administration’s plans to open nearly all US coastal waters and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling.

Mimzy via Pixabay


You can’t see it, but your phone and your internet connection emits non-ionizing radiation. Scientists and doctors have been debating the health and environmental effects of radiation for years.

Jordan Uhl


In the 45 years since the Supreme Court decided the landmark Roe v. Wade case, which legalized abortion in the United States, mostly Republicans have enacted hundreds of policies that restrict access to abortion and other reproductive care.

How has access to abortion changed in the decades since that watershed case? We’ll speak with women who are fighting for abortion access and women who remember what life was like when abortion was illegal.



On the next Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll speak with Penn State professor and climatologist Michael Mann who calls the Trump administration the most anti-science and anti-environmental administration in US history.

Angela Johnston / KALW News


In hundreds of communities across the state, the water coming out of the tap is still not drinkable. Many of these places are small, rural, and economically disadvantaged — the bulk of them are located in the Central Valley. But the Bay Area isn’t immune, and the solutions aren’t easy.

We're marking MLK Jr. Day by discussing environmental justice with Mustafa Ali, the former head of the EPA's environmental justice program. Over the past 24 years, he's worked with hundreds of communities of color, low income communities, and indigenous populations.

Angela Johnston

A long legal battle over shipping coal out of the new Oakland export terminal is headed to trial.

Chuck Grimmett/Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Most of us don’t even think about the health effects of cannabis secondhand smoke — partly because there’s very little research being done on it.

By 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Dr. Marcus Eriksen about his new book, Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution.

On the first Your Call of 2018, we'll be joined by a panel of young environmental activists from around the Bay Area to discuss the state of the environmental movement.  How are they connecting global crises with local action? What did they accomplish in 2017 and what's at the top of their agenda for the new year?


The new documentary Company Town follows a group of citizens in Crossett, a small town in Arkansas, who are fighting for their lives against Georgia-Pacific, one of the nation’s largest paper mills and chemical plants, owned by the billionaire Koch brothers.

What’s being done to protect wild orangutans and other endangered wildlife? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with conservation scientist Dr. Ian Singleton about the discovery of a new orangutan species in the Indonesian forest.

Your Call: Hacking the American Mind

Dec 21, 2017


UCSF endocrinologist Robert Lustig is best known for his research into the addictive properties of sugar. In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind, Lustig widens his scope to look at how the food industry has fostered today’s epidemics of addiction and depression.

Angela Johnston


Ben Durkee is a true Trinity local. He’s lived and worked in the Northern California county his entire life.