Health, Science, Environment

Health, science, and environment news

On the next Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll discuss the relationship between climate change and physical and mental health with Drs. Jay Lemery and Paul Auerbach, authors of Enviromedics: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health.

Used Under CC via Pixabay

  

#Metoo continues to make international headlines. Actresses, actors, journalists, and politicians are sharing stories about sexual harassment and assault.

Angela Johnston

The devastating October 2017 wildfires in Northern California were the worst in the state’s history, and fire scientists expect more of these extreme blazes to become the norm. Millions of dead trees turn forests into tinderboxes. And many of those trees were killed by one tiny culprit — the bark beetle.

  

What are the psychological, environmental, and economic costs of war? That’s the question a number of contributors explore in The War and Environment Reader, edited by Gar Smith.

How was the San Francisco Bay formed?

Nov 5, 2017
State of California Department of Conservation / cropped and resized

KALW listener Claudia Zeiler wanted to know how and when the San Francisco Bay was formed. 

Don't get confused — Covered California still exists

Nov 2, 2017
Covered California

As open enrollment for Covered California begins, President Trump’s recent attempts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act have caused a lot of confusion. KALW’s Health Reporter Marissa Ortega-Welch gave some pointers for navigating the chaos.

What happens to the plastic bags we recycle?

Nov 2, 2017
Victor Andronache / cropped and resized

KALW listener Mimi Manning wanted to know what happens to the plastic bags that are dropped off to be recycled at grocery stores. 

4richmond.org

The open enrollment period for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act begins on Wednesday, November 1st, and runs for three months in California. The Trump administration has cut enrollment periods in half and reduced funding for public outreach from $100 million to $10 million.

The administration has also canceled cost-sharing reimbursements to insurers, which reduce costs for low-income people. In this time of turmoil and uncertainty, what do you want to know to get the best available coverage? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

  

One year after Standing Rock, what is the state of Native activism? What have we learned about the brutal crackdowns?

  

What explains the rise of the right in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance?

Flickr user Jasperdo under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

 

Governor Brown’s plan to build tunnels under the Delta suffered another setback when the Santa Clara Valley Water district decided it would only fund the project if it is scaled back.

  

When disasters happen, what's the best way to help?

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

The destructive wildfires that raged through Northern California over the last couple weeks burned close to 250,000 acres of land, forced 100,000 people to evacuate their homes, and tragically took the lives of 42 people.

Insects make up about two-thirds of all life on Earth, but since 2006, honey bees and other pollinators have experienced rapid population declines. New research has found that the flying insect population in nature reserves across Germany has plummeted by 75 percent in the past 25 years.

New American Story Project / Photos by Ed Ntiri

  

In 2014, US and Mexican authorities apprehended more than 340,000 people fleeing Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

AFP

Two dozen fires have burned almost 200,000 acres of wild and urban spaces in Northern California, destroying more than 5,700 structures and killing at least 34 people.

  

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with investigative journalist Raissa Robles about the media landscape in the Philippines and President Rodrigo Duterte’s deadly war on drugs, which has led to thousands of deaths.

Torbakhapper / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The Summer of Love was San Francisco’s most celebrated party — but it came with a massive collective hangover. Free love had a hidden cost: sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea spread through the nation in the late 1960s and '70s. Now it’s back, 50 years later.

KALW reporter Ninna Gaensler-Debs

  

We’ll discuss the fires ravaging the North Bay from Rohnert Park.

  

Every year, the Brower Youth Awards recognizes the work of six young leaders for their accomplishments in the environmental movement.

  

What advancements have been made in the fight against breast cancer?

Snow Leopard Conservancy

The snow leopard, listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature since 1972, was reclassified as "vulnerable" earlier this month. So what does that mean for the survival of the species?

  

The new documentary Company Town follows a group of citizens in Crossett, a small town in Arkansas, who are fighting for their lives against Georgia-Pacific, one of the nation’s largest paper mills and chemical plants, owned by the billionaire Koch brothers.

 

Flickr user J R under CC BY 2.0

 

From switching to renewable energy to battery storage, to taxing drinking water. Out of the hundreds of bills that the California Assembly debated in the final hours of the legislative session this month, many dealt with water, climate change, and the environment. KALW's energy and environment reporter Angela Johnston shares some of the key environmental legislation now sitting on Governor Brown’s desk, and the ones that didn’t make it there.

CRISPR, the powerful gene editing technique that enables the precise modification of genes, is revolutionizing medicine and biotechnology. It can be used to alter embryonic DNA, delay the aging process, treat cancer, and other diseases. 

  On this edition of our One Planet series, we’ll discuss the push for electric cars.  More than 500,000 electric cars have been sold in the US, half of them in California. 

Claire Stremple

 

Jessie Beck, a biologist with Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge, is our captain on today’s inflatable boat commute to Año Nuevo Island.

  

Technology has transformed the way scientists and researchers track animals around the globe. In their new book, Where The Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology in 50 Maps and Graphics, designer Oliver Uberti and geographer James Cheshire explore the animal tracking revolution.

In 2015, a massive investigation by Inside Climate News and the LA Times detailed how Exxon conducted cutting-edge climate research decades ago and then, without revealing all that it had learned, worked at the forefront of climate denial.

Jen Olenik

Dr. Emily Silverman noticed that she and her colleagues were missing a creative outlet for processing their professional experiences. So, she created the live storytelling event, The Nocturnist.

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