HIV

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 9th

Mar 9, 2015
Brant Ward / The Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

S.F. plans to move entire homeless encampments into housing // SF Gate

Living with HIV as a senior

Feb 10, 2015
Jasmin Lopez

People 50 years or older now make up the majority of HIV and AIDS cases in San Francisco. Since HIV emerged in the 1980s, treatments have improved -- allowing people to live longer with this chronic illness. So as the number of older people living with HIV grows, so do the other things that come with age -- like access to affordable housing and health care, mental health issues and isolation.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Giant Tree's Tale: Gifts and Ornaments Grow With It

Dec 11, 2014
Peretz Partensky

  

The Tale of Tom & Jerry's Tree:Tom Taylor and Jerry Goldstein's Xmas Tree & Holiday Spectacular in SF's Dolores Heights draws thousands of visitors. The tree is 65 feet tall. They use a crane to place oversized ornaments, presents, and stuffed toy animals. Why put on this extravagant display every December, for 20+ years now, at huge expense? It's one of their gifts to the city - and maybe a reason they've stuck together 41 years!  Tom & Jerry, active philanthropists, also founded the Diversity Foundation of San Francisco. Meet them, hear their tale and their tree's on Out in the Bay, 7pm Thursday, Dec. 11. Eric Jansen hosts.

Daniel Moore

For decades, San Francisco has been offering free condoms, STD testing, and counseling to its residents to help end the HIV epidemic. These interventions have had a big impact over the years, but the city still saw about 350 new HIV infections last year.  And nationally, “there are about 50,000 new HIV infections that happen ever year,” according to Susan Philip of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. “That is an unacceptable number. So we know that we need more tools in the arsenal.”

StoryCorps: A good attitude until the end

Sep 29, 2014
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Frank Hatch lived with HIV for more than 20 years, only to be diagnosed with late-stage prostate cancer in 2010. For comfort and guidance, he turned to his Buddhism practice. And then, with encouragement from his nephew, he decided to do something he never thought he could: a 16-day rafting trip in the Grand Canyon.

A mile-high look at modern US history. Is it true most male flight attendants are gay? Was it ever? How did their legal battles with airlines help advance gay rights and workplace gender equity? Is the tale of “Patient Zero” – a steward accused of being the initial transcontinental spreader of HIV – accurate? Stow your tray tables and put your seats in their fully upright and locked positions for a quick flight through the history of airline stewards. Eric Jansen's guest is Philadelphia University history professor Phil Tiemeyer, author of Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality and AIDS in the history of male flight attendants, published by University of California Press.

Interview: Naina Khanna

Jul 9, 2014

Back when HIV was first diagnosed in San Francisco, it hit the gay male population hard. Since that time, the virus has spread to more diverse communities. Naina Khanna is the executive director for Positive Women’s Network, which represents more than 2,500 HIV positive women. In 2010, she was appointed to president Obama’s Advisory council on HIV/AIDS. When Khanna herself was diagnosed with HIV in 2002, she was actually working on a different political campaign, as she told KALW’s Ben Trefny. 

StoryCorps: Honoring yourself by honoring others

Jul 9, 2014

It takes all kinds of people to help support those with HIV. Friends and co-workers Adrienne Elias and Eric Sutter come from very different backgrounds, but they both feel passionate about their work at Shanti, a San Francisco non-profit dedicated to enhancing the lives of people with HIV and other life threatening illnesses.

Living with AIDS behind prison walls

May 5, 2014

 


Reporter’s Notebook: My uncle’s battle with HIV

Feb 4, 2014

When I was eight years old, I rode on one of Mexico’s passenger trains from Mexicali to Guadalajara with my uncle, David. All summer, we visited towns and family throughout the country, learning more and more about our heritage and each other. At the time, I had only heard of him through the occasional family story, so I was unaware of my uncle’s estrangement from our family. I’m not sure what the circumstances were that allowed us to travel together, but I’m grateful for them. I was able to spend a summer on an unforgettable adventure with an uncle that I wouldn’t see again.


  

San Francisco’s latest survey of its homeless children and adults found that 29% of them were gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, while only about 15% of the city’s overall population is LGBT. So Monday, the city holds its first-ever LGBTQ Connect, a targeted version of its Project Homeless Connect events that help low-income people find housing and a wide range of services. Tonight on Out in the Bay, Eric Jansen’s guests are Project Homeless Connect program director Emily Cohen and AIDS Housing Alliance SF director Brian Basinger, instrumental in creating LGBTQ Connect. Tune in 7pm Thursday to learn about the services to be offered Monday at LGBTQ Connect and for a discussion about what "homeless" means in today's economy, why LGBT people have a hard time in homeless shelters and a hard time getting services, how evictions are disproportionately affecting LGBT people, and how San Francisco and other cities are addressing these challenges. 

Under CC license from Flickr user transitpeople

Living with HIV or AIDS can be hard. Even with advances in treatment, symptoms can be hard to manage, and medication is expensive. If you live in San Francisco, it’s even harder -- because the cost of living is so high. The median price  for a one-bedroom apartment in the city is almost $2,800 -- already out of reach for many low-income people, and even harder for people whose medical costs get higher as their diseases advance. The cost of medication an HIVs patient has to take can reach nearly $30,000 per year.  But for sixteen years, San Francisco’s had a place to help low-income AIDs patients. Leland House in Visitacion Valley. KALW student reporter Megan Quintana has always known about Leland House because her mom is a nursing assistant there.