Homelessness

Liza Veale

 


When winter comes, Bay Area cities open temporary shelters to keep unhoused residents warm and dry. But, as winter comes to an end, these shelters close down. In Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco about 500 homeless people will be back on the streets.

Stories Behind the Fog: George

Mar 5, 2018
Courtesy of Stories Behind the Fog

George came out to San Francisco in the 90s, and worked at a computer company. But after his health started to deteriorate, he lost his job, and ended up homeless and panhandling.

Liza Veale

 

Today, San Francisco began construction on a housing development in Mission Bay, a complex that will house 62 homeless veterans and 59 low-income families.

The weather did not stop housing leaders from gathering under a muddy tent to celebrate.

 

“Thanks for coming out in the rain,” said Michael Blecker of Swords to Plowshares, the veterans' services organization. “And, of course the folks who will be living here will be out of the rain.”

The Guardian

One of our listeners, Consuelo Faust, recently asked us a question through our Hey Area project: “Is it fact or urban legend that other cities or even States send their homeless people to San Francisco?”

https://s-i.huffpost.com/gen/2288648/images/o-OM-BUILD-TINY-HOMES-facebook.jpg / Huffington Post

  

Every big city in California seems to have its own creative approach to housing the homelessness. San Jose is talking about tiny homes. Huge communal tents are being set up in San Diego. Oakland is using tuff sheds. And in San Francisco, the city’s navigation centers are meant to be a stepping stone to permanent housing. But does anyone know how to create real housing for the poor in the midst of plenty?

Guests:

Jennifer Friedenbach, executive director of San Francisco’s Coalition on Homelessness

"PRO401(K) 2012" by CC Flickr user 1040 - US Tax Return, resized and recropped

 

The Republican tax bill will likely be up for a vote by the end of the week. The final version is expected to be released on Wednesday. These tax changes will hit California harder than much of the rest of the country, and it will likely hit us in a weak spot: the housing crisis.

Liza Veale / KALW News

 

A recent county-wide survey in Alameda reported that homelessness has increased 39 percent over the last two years.

Andrew Stelzer

San Francisco’s “housing first” philosophy makes some accommodations for homeless alcoholics. But there’s a more cutting-edge experiment taking place elsewhere, and advocates say the city needs to get on board.

Sharon Wickham, San Francisco Public Press

 

The latest edition of the San Francisco Public Press includes a story about one possible solution to homelessness — hotels.

City Visions: Homelessness experts talk solutions

Oct 23, 2017

  San Francisco spends over $275 million a year on homelessness, but is progress being made?  A walk through San Francisco's streets might suggest our homelessness problem is worse than ever.  

Stories Behind the Fog: Briana

Oct 5, 2017
Stories Behind the Fog

Briana Johnson was homeless and struggling to remain in school. When she found the Life Learning Academy, fellow students gave her shelter and Principal Teri Delane helped her through difficult years. Briana spoke to Stories Behind the Fog's Arjanna van der Plas about her time there.

Stories Behind the Fog: Cherri

Oct 4, 2017
Stories Behind The Fog

 

After 23 years in prison, Cherri Frazier moved into a halfway house in San Francisco.

Stories Behind the Fog: Nieves

Oct 3, 2017
Jonath Mathew, resized and recropped

 

Nieves Moreno grew up in Chicago and was homeless from 1969 to 1989. He shared his story with Arjanna Vander Plas and Maria Muzas.

Humanizing homelessness, one story at a time

Oct 3, 2017
Brenton Gieser

 

Ariel Plotnick

Safe Time Home Sharing, a new nonprofit organization, is trying to alleviate the homelessness crisis by asking East Bay residents to open their homes, and temporarily donate their extra bedrooms to those in need.

Caring for the homeless and their four-legged friends

Sep 25, 2017
Ramon Johnson

 

This story originally aired in October of 2016. 

 

An effort to keep homeless people safe in Santa Clara County has gone to the dogs. And the occasional cat.

A San Jose shelter now opens its doors to pets, and hosts a free veterinary clinic the last Saturday of each month. The clinic is a partnership with the city’s Animal Care Center.

Sonja Hutson

Oversized-vehicle parking bans are leaving people who sleep in RVs and vans searching for places to park and live, and leaving public officials trying to balance their empathy for those people with public nuisance complaints.

Screenshot of City Council public footage

A year ago, San Jose's homeless advocates were excited by city-approved plans to build the Bay Area’s first "tiny home" villages for homeless people.

Yet now that the city has to pick locations for these proposed villages, objections from nearby residents have become a major stumbling block.

Laura Waxmann, resized and recropped

 

 

Nicole Grigg

 

It wasn’t easy to find at first. The Dogpatch Navigation Center is located on the waterfront, at the end of 25th St. and Michigan, on the southeast side of San Francisco.

Ignacio Munguía / Used under CC / flickr

 

What has changed for San Francisco’s homeless population under the city’s new homeless director Jeff Kositsky?

Courtesy of Dish SF

All week we’ve been airing a series of SRO Stories, profiling the residents of single room occupancy buildings. These residential hotels are the housing of last resort for a lot of people that would otherwise be homeless.

Ariel Messman-Rucker, thestreetspirit.org

 

If you spend time walking around the East Bay, you may have seen a homeless person selling newspapers.

Photo courtesy of flickr user Fabrice Florin: http://bit.ly/2gDBEcy

UCSF is conducting one of the first ongoing studies on the experience of homelessness among adults over 50. It’s called the Health Outcomes of People Experiencing Homelessness in Older Middle Age, or HOPE - HOME. 

PHOTO COURTESTY OF DISH SF

The housing of last resort for a lot of people that would otherwise be homeless are SRO’s, or single room occupancy hotels.

Prop Q is about clarifying the city’s policy on homeless tent encampments. Right now, tents and other make-shift shelters often violate a few rules, like sit/lie or public nuisance ordinances and other rules against blocking sidewalks. Prop Q would make them specifically illegal.

Cari Spivack

 

At 8:30 on Monday morning, instead of taking her son Jasper to preschool, Jennine Jacob and her three-year-old set up a tent on the sidewalk in front of San Francisco’s City Hall.

Liza Veale

 

Some homeless advocates in San Francisco are working to make the streets more hospitable for those who are forced to live on them. Proposition Q wants to nullify those efforts, by making encampments specifically illegal.

Lucy kang

 

Lisa Galinis and Laura Sinai are sitting at a folding table with stacks of voter registration cards near the intersection of Turk and Hyde in San Francisco, registering people in the Tenderloin to vote.

 

Glass King, a recycling center in West Oakland that's a source of income and safety net for roughly 400 daily walk-up recyclers, is set to close on August 20th. That is, unless supporters of the center successfully petition the city to withdraw its orders to shut the center down.

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