housing

ABC7 News

Here’s what’s happening around the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News

 

 Rent-controlled units are now more abundant in San Francisco than in New York City // SF Examiner

Chris Hambrick

 

Here in the Bay Area, rents are rising, and housing inventory is shrinking. It’s forcing many here to decide -- either you have to leave the area completely, or you have to get creative about your housing situation. There are people living in remodeled warehouses and RVs -- but what if you wanted to create your own out-of-the-box house?

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Jul 21, 2015
Ted Friedman

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland still wading in trash; council delays action // Oakland Tribune

"The City Council on Monday delayed making changes to Oakland's unpopular trash contract after weeks of complaints from residents and business owners over higher garbage rates, saying it needed more information before taking action on the deal.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Jul 7, 2015
Susan Cohen/KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News

It’s On: Airbnb Regulation Set To Hit San Francisco’s Ballot This November​ // Tech Crunch

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 28, 2015

May 28, 2015
Evan Ducharme / SF Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Major expansion approved for Bay Area Bike Share // SF Examiner

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 7, 2015

May 7, 2015
Mike Koozmin/SF Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Taxi drivers catch a break from SFMTA // SF Examiner

"Fearing unfair competition from Uber and Lyft, The City just cut taxi drivers a break. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency board of directors voted unanimously Tuesday to approve waiving taxi medallion renewal fees for this year, which are $1,000 annually.

March 29 was the last night Delilah Soto slept on the street. She’s a recovering heroin addict who’s been living in a tent in San Francisco’s Mission District with her girlfriend, Rocky Anderson, and their dog Sparta. That night, she learned they had another choice.

Nearby, 1950 Mission St. was dead space. A closed-down school site sitting on premium San Francisco real estate, begging to be repurposed. On March 30, the gates opened on a new pilot program called the “Navigation Center”.

flickr user Jeremy Brooks

 

In one of America's most expensive cities, there's a fringe political party whose name sums up their concerns: The Rent is Too Damn High. That city is New York – but in San Francisco rents are even higher. And while no party around here has been quite so blunt about it, organizations are taking action.

The Bay Area Council Economic Institute hosted a housing forum earlier this year, and the conversation showed there are many ways to look at the problem – and many ways to disagree on how to solve it.

There are at least 7,000 homeless people in San Francisco each night, and only enough shelter space to house a small fraction of them. This is one of the reasons San Francisco recently held the first Town Hall to End Homelessness in which city officials and community leaders renewed their commitment to do just that.

But if you’re going to talk ways to end homelessness in San Francisco, why not start by talking to the people with the most experience?

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Mar 18, 2015
Carlos Avila Gonzalez / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news.

UC Berkeley black students demand fixes to 'hostile’ climate // SF GATE

"Black students at UC Berkeley often feel isolated and even oppressed, says a campus group that wants the nation’s premier public university to step up recruitment of African American students and improve support for them.

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 16, 2015

Mar 16, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Diablo Canyon nuclear plant safe in earthquakes, PG&E says in report // LA Times

"California’s last remaining nuclear power plant can safely withstand earthquakes, tsunamis and flooding, according to documents submitted by the owner of the Diablo Canyon plant to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 5th

Mar 5, 2015
Laura Wenus

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Marcy Fraser / KALW

 


Jacqueline Cooper is a lot like you.

“I'm not any different than anybody else,” she says. “I'm a mother, I'm a daughter, I'm a sister, a wife at one point.”

However, there’s more to her than that. For one, she’s a retired United States Marine Corps sergeant. For another, she’s dealt with mental illness throughout her life.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express

Jen Chien

California leads the nation in its population of senior citizens. The ratio of working-age adults to those over 65 is projected to plunge in the next few decades. Meanwhile, the need for financial and social support for this growing number of older adults presents new challenges for our society and our economy. One of the most pressing issues facing seniors is isolation.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

Near the end of World War II, architects were anticipating the post-war housing shortage. Wallace Neff was L.A.'s start architect at the time, and wanted to create a solution that would not only meet this demand, but address the need for housing worldwide.

Mortgage Debt Issues Confronting Retired/Retiring  Consumers
Guests: Frank Adam, Real Estate/Tax attorney; Keith Ogden, attorney with Community Legal Services of
East Palo Alto (a non-profit legal services organization); Cara Pierce, Reverse Mortgage and Housing Counselor.
Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests please call 415-841-4134.
 

Sara Brooke Curtis

Every place has a history hidden that lives beneath what you can see on the surface. Just take the Mission District. The Bart Station at 24th street and Mission is called Plaza Sandino by some -- because in the 1980’s Pro-Sandanista protesters would rally there. Right down the street, Potrero del Sol Park is better known to those who grew up here as La Raza park -- back in the 70’s it was a major gathering spot for low rider cars. This neighborhood has also been called the birthplace of Latin Rock.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/

Real estate markets run in cycles, and right now our regional market is soaring. While the national median price for a home is just over $200,000, the median price paid for a home in the nine-county Bay Area last month was just about $600,000.

Under CC license from Flickr user Jon Starbuck.

KALW’s Liz Pfeffer speaks with Hana Baba about housing-related measures on the upcoming San Francisco ballot, including Propositions K and G.

    

Like everywhere in the Bay Area, home prices in Oakland have recently gone through the roof. The price of a house there is up almost 70% in the past two years. But West Oakland resident Steve DeCaprio has discovered an unusual way to acquire a home for free. DeCaprio has become an expert in finding and taking over abandoned homes – and it’s not as illegal as it might sound.

SF Public Press

San Francisco's housing crisis has been making headlines for a while now. It’s hard to avoid the numerous news reports on skyrocketing rent prices, controversial evictions, or horror stories of terrible housing situations. But, there’s been far less coverage of what actual solutions there might be for these issues.

Reentry: Two men seek homes after prison release

Aug 6, 2014
Luisa Beck

A note to our readers: the names of formerly incarcerated men and their families in this story have been changed to protect their identities.

It’s hard to tell how old William Bennett and his friend John Porter are based on looks. Bennett is about six feet tall, wears a silver ear stud, and has a signature cologne: Gypsy Musk. Porter is a little shorter. He has big eyes, a small gap in his upper teeth, and a huge friendly grin. Both of them have a determined and yet playful air about them. When they show me the kitchen they share with 12 other guys, they start the kind of banter that only two trusted friends can get away with.

San Francisco's Hunters Point Shipyard has played many roles. In the 1940s, it became a magnet for African Americans migrating from the South seeking jobs in the Navy's shipbuilding and maintenance industry. In the 1970s, when the military started to leave, it became an empty shell – a massive, polluted space eventually designated a Superfund site. Now, it's being redeveloped with the promise of new housing, jobs and open space. But in today's San Francisco, who is it for?

San Francisco’s real estate prices, rents and eviction rates are at an all-time high, causing real tension between tenants and landlords.  Frequently we hear from renters about the struggles of living in the city, but it’s not often that we hear from the owners of their buildings.

In San Francisco, about one third of the population are property owners. Those who are small-time landlords are struggling to maintain solvency in this explosive housing market.

Liz Pfeffer


California has the largest concentration of homeless veterans in the nation, and in San Francisco, it’s likely that more than 700 homeless vets will sleep on the street or in shelters this Veterans Day. 

According to Bevan Dufty, director of San Francisco’s Housing, Opportunity, Partnerships and Engagement (HOPE) program, housing homeless veterans is a high priority for the city. And the number of homeless veterans has decreased since last year, thanks in part to the opening of a permanent supportive housing facility called Veterans Commons.

  

San Francisco’s latest survey of its homeless children and adults found that 29% of them were gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, while only about 15% of the city’s overall population is LGBT. So Monday, the city holds its first-ever LGBTQ Connect, a targeted version of its Project Homeless Connect events that help low-income people find housing and a wide range of services. Tonight on Out in the Bay, Eric Jansen’s guests are Project Homeless Connect program director Emily Cohen and AIDS Housing Alliance SF director Brian Basinger, instrumental in creating LGBTQ Connect. Tune in 7pm Thursday to learn about the services to be offered Monday at LGBTQ Connect and for a discussion about what "homeless" means in today's economy, why LGBT people have a hard time in homeless shelters and a hard time getting services, how evictions are disproportionately affecting LGBT people, and how San Francisco and other cities are addressing these challenges. 

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