human trafficking

Human trafficking is estimated to be in the millions--yet only a fraction of it is reported. We talk to Hediana Utarti of Asian Women's Shelter in San Francisco, which helps immigrants--including LGBT and human trafficking victims--to get out of abusive situations.

Sara Brooke Curtis

San Francisco has some of the country’s highest reports of human trafficking. It’s one of the top 10 cities in the U.S where trafficking is the worst. The practice is often called modern-day slavery: traffickers use sexual exploitation, fraud, and forced labor to keep people powerless. It’s the second most profitable crime in the world, generating more than $32 billion per year -- just behind drug trafficking.

Human trafficking is the second most profitable criminal enterprise in the world. It's estimated to rake in $32 billion per year after drug trafficking. San Francisco is one of the nation’s trafficking centers.

On today's Your Call, we’ll continue our election coverage with a debate on Proposition 35. If it passes, it would increase criminal penalties for human traffickers.   Supporters say it would protect vulnerable populations from exploitation.  Opponents say the language is too broad, penalties are too severe, and the wrong people would suffer.  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here. What questions do you have about proposition 35?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Photo courtesy of http://newamericamedia.org/2012/02/human-trafficking-a-growing-global-scourge.php

Slavery doesn’t often make the headlines, but the practice is alive and well in the 21st century. According to an investigation in the San Francisco Public Press, there are more people enslaved today than at any other time in history. The U.S. State Department says that estimates of those enslaved through human trafficking ranges from 4 million to 27 million people.