immigration | KALW

immigration

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

 

In the past few weeks, the Bay Area has had one protest after another over the country’s immigration policies. There were thousands of people who took to the streets to march in protest of family separation.

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As thousands of migrant children wait to be reunited with their parents, images of them in detention centers continue to rock the country. Poet and activist Tongo Eisen-Martin traveled to McAllen, Texas to see what was happening for himself.

Gen Fujitani

Last month in San Francisco, an estimated 30,000 people protested against President Trump’s zero-tolerance immigration policy, which has led to the incarceration and separation of children from their parents.

One particularly vocal group at the protest: Japanese Americans, part of the group Nikkei Resistors. 

Courtesty of Catholic Charities

We’ve heard about kids sent to camps and detention facilities and we’ve seen the images of children in cages, wrapped up in foil blankets. One question we’ve been asking is—what happens to them after detention?

Marisol Medina-Cadena / KALW News

 

A new generation of Oakland-raised Maya are working to give their communities a voice in their native tongues.

Gabrielle Lurie / San Francisco Chronicle

 

As the nation has been following for weeks now, thousands of migrant children coming to the United States are separated from their families at the Southern border.

Image courtesy A Moment in Time Productions

  

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss Still I Rise, a new documentary short series that pays homage to Maya Angelou’s poem by the same name by celebrating people who persevere in spite of their struggles.

 

 

On this special edition of Your Call, we get an update from a nonprofit working with immigrant families at the US-Mexico border. What do we know, and what information is missing, about separated immigrant families?

Guest:

Jennifer K. Falcon, communications director for RAICES Texas, the largest immigration legal services provider in Texas. 

Web Resources:

Photo courtesy of Rosa Furneax

 

 

President Trump yesterday called for an end to due process rights for immigrants who enter the country illegally.

 

That comes after last week’s flurry of reports that thousands of families have been separated at the southern United States border.

 

What does this all mean for undocumented families here in the Bay Area?

http://immigrationimpact.com/

On this week's media roundtable, we'll discuss the North Korea-US summit. Journalist Tim Shorrock reports that the media response portrays a cynical disregard for South Korea.

Mark Coplan

Visiting the Bay Area from Honduras, human rights activist Ismael Moreno stopped by the KALW studio to speak about root causes beneath the exodus that is pushing a growing number of Hondurans out of their home country.

Judy Silber

 

A crowd of about 60 people sit scattered in the pews of St. John’s Presbyterian Church in Berkeley. They sing “Caminando” — translated as “Walking,” in English, a nod to the millions of Mexicans and Central Americans who have journeyed to the United States in search of better lives.

San Quentin Radio: Losing your language in prison

May 16, 2018
MICHAEL LORUSSO / Flikr / Creative Commons

Imagine if you forgot how to speak the language you learned as a child — a language that gave you an identity, a language that says, "Hey you belong here, you're one of us." How will your sense of self be impacted?

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW News

 

A leaked document from the Department of Homeland Security proposes to make it more difficult for immigrants who use public services to remain in the United States.

Sonia Narang

 

21-year-old San Francisco student Isik Berfin has a special bond with her mom. Both are musicians in the Turkish Alevi tradition, which has been passed down in their Kurdish family through generations. Alevism is nominally a branch of Islam, but also has influences from Sufism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism and shamanism. 

Many people know about the Armenian genocide in Turkey, which was commemorated earlier this week — but fewer are aware that the Alevis have also faced persecution, both historically and in recent years.

The U.S. Census Bureau conducts a new count every decade — and the next one is coming up in 2020. Last month the bureau released the questions they intend to use … and one new question has caused vigorous debate and multiple lawsuits.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

  

On this edition of Your Call, we'll discuss immigration detention. Last week, ICE detained 150 people in Northern California. ICE says 800 more were spared after Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf warned the public of possible arrests. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was in Sacramento yesterday, announcing a lawsuit against California over several state immigration laws.

Courtesy of Faisal Zedan

 

Oakland’s Faisal Zedan is a musician from a village in southern Syria. Growing up, his family loved music, and he grew to be obsessed with Arabic drums called darabukkas.

Courtesy of Jamal

 

When Jamal left his home in Aleppo in 2010 for a year-long Fulbright scholarship in the United States, he assumed he was coming back.

COURTESY OF JOSE ARTIGA

It's been over a year since President Donald Trump issued an executive order promising to halt federal funding for cities that limit cooperation with immigration agents. After the order was made, mayors from across the country vowed to remain so called “sanctuary cities” anyway. 

""No Human Being is Illegal" by CC Flickr user Lynn Friedman

 

Last week in San Francisco, Omer Abdelmaged entered a government office in the SoMa district for an asylum interview.

Photo by Rodney Dunning, used under Creative Commons license via Flickr

On this edition of Your Call:  Immigrants who have lived in the United States for the majority of their lives or have fled dangerous conflicts are being deported. In many cases, they no longer have connections to their home countries. ICE is now arresting people after they drop their kids off at school or at when they show up for their regular ICE check-in.

ep_jhu / Flickr Creative Commons

 

Elected officials throughout the state have made it clear that they do not agree with federal immigration policy.

nyuhuhuu / Flickr / Creative Commons

Many messy discrepancies remain between state and federal law regarding cannabis use. For the estimated 5 millions immigrants living in California who are not U.S. citizens, the stakes are high — especially when it comes cannabis.

Our immigration reporter Ninna Gaensler-Debs tells us more about what Proposition 64 will mean for immigrants here in the Bay Area. 

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

After the destruction of the North Bay Fires, most Sonoma County residents could get financial assistance to help rebuild. But for the more than 40,000 undocumented immigrants living there, access to financial support has been limited.

KUOW PHOTO/CAROLINE CHAMBERLAIN

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Call this hotline if ICE is at your door

Nov 27, 2017
Tom Levy

The San Francisco Rapid Response Network hotline, (415) 200-1548, supports people faced with imminent deportation or immigration issues, and is part of a wave of regional support for immigrants living in the Bay Area.

You can get a full list of rapid-response hotlines for the greater Bay Area and adjacent regions at the end of this article. This story originally aired in March of 2017, and has been updated online. 

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Update: As of January 2018, the Trump administration has ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for both Haiti and El Salvador. That means over 250,000 TPS holders will have to return to their home countries.

More than 55,000 immigrants are living in California with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) — a form of humanitarian relief for those whose home countries have had some kind of catastrophe. Now, they’re at risk of losing their legal status.

  

What explains the rise of the right in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance?

Photo by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Department of Homeland Security) / Used under CC


Since Donald Trump took office, ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) says agents have made 43 percent more arrests this year compared to this time last year.

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