immigration

Mark Coplan

Visiting the Bay Area from Honduras, human rights activist Ismael Moreno stopped by the KALW studio to speak about root causes beneath the exodus that is pushing a growing number of Hondurans out of their home country.

Judy Silber

 

A crowd of about 60 people sit scattered in the pews of St. John’s Presbyterian Church in Berkeley. They sing “Caminando” — translated as “Walking,” in English, a nod to the millions of Mexicans and Central Americans who have journeyed to the United States in search of better lives.

San Quentin Radio: Losing your language in prison

May 16, 2018
MICHAEL LORUSSO / Flikr / Creative Commons

Imagine if you forgot how to speak the language you learned as a child — a language that gave you an identity, a language that says, "Hey you belong here, you're one of us." How will your sense of self be impacted?

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW News

 

A leaked document from the Department of Homeland Security proposes to make it more difficult for immigrants who use public services to remain in the United States.

Sonia Narang

 

21-year-old San Francisco student Isik Berfin has a special bond with her mom. Both are musicians in the Turkish Alevi tradition, which has been passed down in their Kurdish family through generations. Alevism is nominally a branch of Islam, but also has influences from Sufism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism and shamanism. 

Many people know about the Armenian genocide in Turkey, which was commemorated earlier this week — but fewer are aware that the Alevis have also faced persecution, both historically and in recent years.

The U.S. Census Bureau conducts a new count every decade — and the next one is coming up in 2020. Last month the bureau released the questions they intend to use … and one new question has caused vigorous debate and multiple lawsuits.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

  

On this edition of Your Call, we'll discuss immigration detention. Last week, ICE detained 150 people in Northern California. ICE says 800 more were spared after Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf warned the public of possible arrests. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was in Sacramento yesterday, announcing a lawsuit against California over several state immigration laws.

Courtesy of Faisal Zedan

 

Oakland’s Faisal Zedan is a musician from a village in southern Syria. Growing up, his family loved music, and he grew to be obsessed with Arabic drums called darabukkas.

Courtesy of Jamal

 

When Jamal left his home in Aleppo in 2010 for a year-long Fulbright scholarship in the United States, he assumed he was coming back.

COURTESY OF JOSE ARTIGA

It's been over a year since President Donald Trump issued an executive order promising to halt federal funding for cities that limit cooperation with immigration agents. After the order was made, mayors from across the country vowed to remain so called “sanctuary cities” anyway. 

""No Human Being is Illegal" by CC Flickr user Lynn Friedman

 

Last week in San Francisco, Omer Abdelmaged entered a government office in the SoMa district for an asylum interview.

Photo by Rodney Dunning, used under Creative Commons license via Flickr

On this edition of Your Call:  Immigrants who have lived in the United States for the majority of their lives or have fled dangerous conflicts are being deported. In many cases, they no longer have connections to their home countries. ICE is now arresting people after they drop their kids off at school or at when they show up for their regular ICE check-in.

ep_jhu / Flickr Creative Commons

 

Elected officials throughout the state have made it clear that they do not agree with federal immigration policy.

nyuhuhuu / Flickr / Creative Commons

Many messy discrepancies remain between state and federal law regarding cannabis use. For the estimated 5 millions immigrants living in California who are not U.S. citizens, the stakes are high — especially when it comes cannabis.

Our immigration reporter Ninna Gaensler-Debs tells us more about what Proposition 64 will mean for immigrants here in the Bay Area. 

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

After the destruction of the North Bay Fires, most Sonoma County residents could get financial assistance to help rebuild. But for the more than 40,000 undocumented immigrants living there, access to financial support has been limited.

KUOW PHOTO/CAROLINE CHAMBERLAIN

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Call this hotline if ICE is at your door

Nov 27, 2017
Tom Levy

The San Francisco Rapid Response Network hotline, (415) 200-1548, supports people faced with imminent deportation or immigration issues, and is part of a wave of regional support for immigrants living in the Bay Area.

You can get a full list of rapid-response hotlines for the greater Bay Area and adjacent regions at the end of this article. This story originally aired in March of 2017, and has been updated online. 

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Update: As of January 2018, the Trump administration has ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for both Haiti and El Salvador. That means over 250,000 TPS holders will have to return to their home countries.

More than 55,000 immigrants are living in California with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) — a form of humanitarian relief for those whose home countries have had some kind of catastrophe. Now, they’re at risk of losing their legal status.

  

What explains the rise of the right in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance?

Photo by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Department of Homeland Security) / Used under CC


Since Donald Trump took office, ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) says agents have made 43 percent more arrests this year compared to this time last year.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

A number of immigration-related bills passed the California Assembly last Friday on the last day of the legislative session. These bills and hundreds of others are now headed to Governor Brown’s desk. They're part of a set that Democrats introduced as an act of "resistance" to Donald Trump.

Here's a list of the bills discussed:

Chemicals without borders: Unearthing the Green Revolution

Sep 7, 2017
: GURDEEP SINGH DHALIWAL

 

Unearthing the Green Revolution, Part III: California's industrial approach to agriculture has long served as a model for government officials in Punjab, India, which dramatically increased crop yields decades ago as part of the high-tech, chemically supplemented Green Revolution. Yet the cost for Punjabi farmers has been a legacy of pesticide reliance, debt, and the hopes for a better life in other countries. 

  

Who's running the government under Donald Trump? That’s the question journalist John Nichols explores in his new book, Horsemen of the Trumpocalypse: A Field Guide to the Most Dangerous People in America

Gurdeep Singh Dhaliwal

 

Unearthing the Green Revolution, Part IIThe story of how agriculture became agribusiness in California and around the world begins in Punjab, India, where the Green Revolution didn't just change how farmers work the land; it changed how they live. 

How rescinding DACA will impact the Bay Area

Sep 5, 2017
Cropped and resized with permission from Alex Chris / Flickr

 

Today the Trump Administration announced plans to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which was created by an executive order signed by President Obama. 

 

Gurdeep Singh Dhaliwal

 

Unearthing the Green Revolution, Part I: California's fertile Central Valley is home to a sizable community of farmers from Punjab in India, a region also famous for its rich cropland. Why they came to the United States is a story as layered and complex as the politics and science of the crops they cultivate. 

Time Magazine


Hurricane Harvey has devastated Houston and other cities along the Gulf Coast. At least 38 deaths have been reported. More than 32,000 people are in shelters across Texas. The city of Port Arthur is under water. Beaumont doesn’t have running water. Over six million people live in the Houston metro area. We’ll discuss media coverage of the devastation, overdevelopment, and climate change.

 

Immigration Attorneys Working for Justice

Aug 23, 2017

Immigration Attorneys Working for Justice by Rapid Response & Legal Representation for undocumented immigrants. Guests include Immigration Law attorneys: Certified Specialist Zachary Nightingale, and Valerie Zukin, Lead Attorney at the Justice & Diversity Center, SF Bar Assn; and Hamid Yasdan Panah, Member of the Iranian American Community of Northern California; & Sara Izadpanah, a Member of the American Immigration Lawyers Assn. Questions for Chuck & his guests? Please call toll-free 866-798-8255. 

Immigration Attorneys Working for Justice

Aug 23, 2017

Immigration Attorneys Working for Justice by Rapid Response & Legal Representation for undocumented immigrants. Guests include Immigration Law attorneys: Certified Specialist Zachary Nightingale, and Valerie Zukin, Lead Attorney at the Justice & Diversity Center, SF Bar Assn; and Hamid Yasdan Panah, Member of the Iranian American Community of Northern California; & Sara Izadpanah, a Member of the American Immigration Lawyers Assn. Questions for Chuck & his guests? Please call toll-free 866-798-8255. 

Your Call: San Francisco Mime Troupe Launches “Walls”

Jul 5, 2017
San Francisco Mime Troupe

For the past 58 years, the San Francisco Mime Troupe has been fighting oppression by creating socially relevant theater and making us laugh at the absurdities of contemporary life. 

If you’ve never seen the Mime Troupe, they’re not actual mimes. They use the word 'mime' in the ancient sense: to mimic. They talk. They sing. And they make a lot of noise. 

This year's performance, 'Walls,' asks: How can a nation of mostly immigrants declare war on immigration?

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