immigration

www.ethiopianopinion.com


Last June, the U.S. Congress made a landmark decision to pass immigration reform. The new law eliminates the Diversity Immigrant Lottery Visa, also known as the Green Card Lottery. 

Solas Live This Saturday 3 pm!

Apr 1, 2014

Just Added!  Solas, one of this country's leading Irish-American bands, will be stopping by the KALW studios this Saturday for a live performance.  Led by talented multi-instrumentalist Seamus Egan, Solas has been called "exciting" and "brilliant."  Thistle & Shamrock calls Solas "Irish America's most influential band."  Solas will perform songs from its latest CD "Shamrock City," a tale of immigration, tragedy, corruption, and discrimination based on the true-life story of Michael Conway.   


Stanford University, Department of Sociology

Last June marked a much anticipated achievement for the US Congress- the passing of the immigration reform bill.

East Bay Espress: The gritty life of a day laborer

Jan 15, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

The Affordable Care Act/Medi-Cal Coverage -- immigration issues.
Guest:  Ellen Wu, Exec. Director, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network
Listeners: please call with questions & comments for Chuck and Ellen Wu: 415-841-4134.
 

Audrey Dilling

Sarahi Espinoza Salamanca and her team of designers and coders have the next 25 hours to build a website. Not just any website, but one that’s engaging enough to influence the national conversation around immigration policy.

From our partners at Youth Radio.

Immigration Fraud and other State Bar Consumer Issues.

Guest: Incoming State Bar of California President Luis Rodriguez; listeners are invited to call with questions for Chuck and his guest on the air, 415-841-4134.

Also tonight, our monthly Call-A-Lawyer Night. While Your Legal Rights is on the air, 7-8pm, please call our off-air law clinic with questions on any topic attorney specialists there are prepared to discuss: 800-525-9917 for private consultation.uez

Mary Willis

Government shutdown causes working visa uncertainty

Oct 10, 2013
Flikr user: Icars

Thousands of people move to the Bay Area for a job. Many are from overseas, requiring a visa to live and work in the United States.

But the Government shutdown has closed a service needed to process some of these temporary work visas.

As a result, there are workers who may be forced to leave the country when their visas expire. Others are currently unable to return to the US without the proper documentation.

IMMIGRATION STORIES: Cynthia Garcia

Sep 25, 2013
flickr user ladybugbkt

The Board of Supervisors passed legislation yesterday that could affect undocumented immigrants living in San Francisco. Under the new Due Process for All ordinance, local law enforcement will not be required to hold undocumented immigrants for federal authorities if they are otherwise due to be released. Up until now, they’ve been required to hold detainees--for at least 48 hours--under a federal program called Secure Communities. Supervisor John Avalos is against the federal policy because of how it plays out in immigrant communities.

flickr user ladybugbkt

Many Californians have come here from somewhere else. In fact, the state has more immigrants than any other in the country. This week, we’re running a series of profiles of immigrants in the Bay Area. Today we meet a medical professional from India and a young woman from Ireland.

flickr user ladybugbkt

 

 

Today, Congress reconvened after summer recess. Immigration advocates had hoped that the comprehensive bill the senate passed back in June would be up for discussion. But with the debate over a possible strike on Syria, and the debt ceiling rearing its head again, and they're worried immigration reform will get buried.

AAYSP-MI

Not long ago, I attended a lecture at UC Berkeley’s Boalt Hall, the law school. It was just before sunset and about 100 Yemeni Americans – mostly young men – filled the room to see and hear their countrywoman, 34-year-old Tawakkul Karman. She’s the activist and revolutionary, who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize for sparking the revolution that ousted Yemeni president Ali Abdalla Saleh.

Photo by GooWakJai, 2010 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/goowakjai/

San Francisco’s Chinatown has interested many tourists over the years. Every day people visit to learn about Chinese American History. 

  


Labor unions have a big stake in immigration reform

May 1, 2013
Adrian Florido

As head of the 800,000-member Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, Maria Elena Durazo is one of the nation’s most powerful union leaders, and a key player in the ongoing immigration reform negotiations. But before her current post, she led a hotel workers’ union. She said one of the hardest parts of the job was convincing workers who were in the country illegally to organize. They feared they could be easily fired, and she said that fear had rippling implications.

The hotly anticipated bill to overhaul our nation's immigration system is expected to be presented Tuesday by a bipartisan group of senators. At stake are the lives of at least 11 million — that’s the number of people living here without proper immigration documents.

From articles, interviews and tweets, we've pieced together what the proposal has in mind for different types of immigrant populations — long-term illegal residents, farm workers and felons, to name a few.

Luis Flores

Tucked away in the student center at University of California Berkeley, the Undocumented Student Program is designed to be a national model. It makes college possible for students without legal status.

Access to legal counsel proves challenging for immigrants

Mar 12, 2013

You would never notice it if you were walking by, because there are no signs, but San Francisco's immigration court is on the eighth and ninth floors of a nondescript office building here on Montgomery Street in the city's financial district. Immigrants can get a notice to appear here if they are facing deportation or applying for asylum. The people outside are here without lawyers. When I asked a man if he had a lawyer, he told me he wasn't sure if they'd let him see a judge or not.

The immigrant experience is meant to be a smooth one, full of promise. Ideally, people from developing countries come to America for better work, education, human rights and, overall, and a better future for their children.

However, many of these stories turn out to be not as polished as that narrative. Immigrants often need to learn a new language, navigate a new system, face realities they never have before, and find their way in a new adopted country. Their hopes are high, and sometimes they end up unmet.

Fraudulent lawyers prey on immigrants

Mar 4, 2013

When criminal defendants can’t afford to pay for a lawyer, the court will appoint them one for free. But not all defendants have that right. If you’re called to immigration court, for example, you have to hire a private attorney. If you can’t afford one, you’re on your own. Many agencies provide free legal services to immigrants in these situations, but these agencies are overwhelmed. And even immigrants who can afford an attorney have to be careful who they hire. Some unlicensed practitioners prey on unsuspecting immigrants to make easy money.

On today's Your Call, it's our Friday media roundtable and we’ll speak with Pilar Marrero, senior political writer for La Opinion about her new book, 'Killing the American Dream: How Anti-Immigration Extremists Are Destroying the Nation." Marrero explores history of immigration in the US from 1986 when reform received bipartisan support, to today. What's in store for the future of immigration reform and how are the media covering these issues? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar

As the summer comes to a close, young adults are saying goodbye to their hometowns, families, and friends as they move on to higher education. But for those who are undocumented, the path to college is much more complicated, a process that many take for granted.

In most parts of the country, students without legal status aren’t eligible for financial aid or scholarships. There is also a lack of guidance from parents, because most students are the first generation to attend an American university. Then there is the constant fear of being deported.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the new program that allows a limited path to employment for immigrant youth.  It is being called the “Dream Act, lite.”  Is this a step towards more comprehensive immigration reform?  Or is it just an election-year strategy to win votes?  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here. What is the ongoing reality of undocumented people in the US today? It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Jose Arreola, outreach manager with Educators for Fair Consideration

Ashleyanne Krigbaum

This morning, thousands of young undocumented immigrants became eligible for temporary legal status due to the implementation of President Obama's policy, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which is considered the most expansive immigration policy to take effect in the past 25 years. The federal initiative grants access to work permits and temporary protection from deportation to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

Flickr user Robert Couse-Baker, under CC License / http://www.flickr.com/photos/29233640@N07/

It’s been a busy season for immigration issues. In June, President Obama announced that he would halt the deportations of undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as minors. A week and a half later, the Supreme Court struck down most of Arizona’s controversial immigration law, SB 1070.

(San Jose Mercury News) // Monday's Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's controversial immigration law upheld the mandate for a police officer to ask for a person's immigration papers after stopping them. In California, the law is not so different from Arizona's, but enforcement varies widely and is often up to the discretion of individual officers…

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