immigration

The immigrant experience is meant to be a smooth one, full of promise. Ideally, people from developing countries come to America for better work, education, human rights and, overall, and a better future for their children.

However, many of these stories turn out to be not as polished as that narrative. Immigrants often need to learn a new language, navigate a new system, face realities they never have before, and find their way in a new adopted country. Their hopes are high, and sometimes they end up unmet.

Fraudulent lawyers prey on immigrants

Mar 4, 2013

When criminal defendants can’t afford to pay for a lawyer, the court will appoint them one for free. But not all defendants have that right. If you’re called to immigration court, for example, you have to hire a private attorney. If you can’t afford one, you’re on your own. Many agencies provide free legal services to immigrants in these situations, but these agencies are overwhelmed. And even immigrants who can afford an attorney have to be careful who they hire. Some unlicensed practitioners prey on unsuspecting immigrants to make easy money.

On today's Your Call, it's our Friday media roundtable and we’ll speak with Pilar Marrero, senior political writer for La Opinion about her new book, 'Killing the American Dream: How Anti-Immigration Extremists Are Destroying the Nation." Marrero explores history of immigration in the US from 1986 when reform received bipartisan support, to today. What's in store for the future of immigration reform and how are the media covering these issues? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar

As the summer comes to a close, young adults are saying goodbye to their hometowns, families, and friends as they move on to higher education. But for those who are undocumented, the path to college is much more complicated, a process that many take for granted.

In most parts of the country, students without legal status aren’t eligible for financial aid or scholarships. There is also a lack of guidance from parents, because most students are the first generation to attend an American university. Then there is the constant fear of being deported.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the new program that allows a limited path to employment for immigrant youth.  It is being called the “Dream Act, lite.”  Is this a step towards more comprehensive immigration reform?  Or is it just an election-year strategy to win votes?  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here. What is the ongoing reality of undocumented people in the US today? It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Jose Arreola, outreach manager with Educators for Fair Consideration

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