incarceration

San Quentin Prison Report: A day of peace

Apr 18, 2016
A Day of Peace at San Quentin Prison. Photo by Peter Merts / Courtesy of Bread & Roses

Ten years ago a race riot shook San Quentin State Prison: civilians were evacuated, and prisoners put on lockdown. When the dust settled, a group of prisoners decided to make a change. They formed the Day of Peace Committee. Through open dialogue and the Annual Day of Peace Celebration, it offers peace as an alternative to violence.

Youth Radio

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our week-long series on the prison system by talking about juvenile incarceration.

Human trafficking is estimated to be in the millions--yet only a fraction of it is reported. We talk to Hediana Utarti of Asian Women's Shelter in San Francisco, which helps immigrants--including LGBT and human trafficking victims--to get out of abusive situations.

Your Call: How do you re-enter society after prison?

Dec 23, 2014

  On the December 23rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll hear stories of people who turned their lives around after over a decade in prison or jail.  Two thirds of people released from California's prison system will return within 3 years. What obstacles prevent people from getting out and staying out?  How does incarceration impact families, especially children?  What kind of support do formerly incarcerated adults want?  It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.  

On the November 6th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Bryan Stevenson, author of “Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption” and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. One in every 15 people in the United States is expected to go to jail or prison, and for  black men, the number increases to one in three. How can we generate empathy both for people who have committed crimes and compassion for victims? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest:

Your Call: How do you re-enter society after prison?

Oct 23, 2014
Ruth Morgan, "The Welcome Home Project"

 

  

On the October 23rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll hear stories of people who turned their lives around after over a decade in prison or jail.  Two thirds of people released from California's prison system will return within 3 years. What obstacles prevent people from getting out and staying out?  How does incarceration impact families, especially children?  What kind of support do formerly incarcerated adults want?  It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.  

Guests:

The Ethics of Captivity on Philosophy Talk

Aug 9, 2014

Whether it's people incarcerated in prisons, or animals confined in zoos, aquariums, laboratories, farms, and in our own homes, millions of upon millions of sentient creatures live in captivity. To be held captive, some might say, is to be denied basic rights of autonomy. But physical captivity, others might say, can have significant social benefits. So under what conditions could it be morally justified to hold a creature in captivity? Should we think of humans and animals differently? And in a civil society, is captivity a necessary harm, or should we work towards eradicating it?

California has one of the highest prison populations in the country. Of the two million people serving time in prisons in the U.S, more than 130,000 of them are incarcerated in our state - a system designed to house 80,000. In response to that overcrowding, the federal government has ordered the state to cut the prison population by about a quarter.

Leila Day

Re-entering after time behind bars is some of the most volatile time for recovery. A recent California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation report shows that within three years, over 60% of inmates recidivate, or re-offend, and return to prison within the first six months of their release.

The Wall Street Journal

California was recently granted an extension to meet the federal government's mandate to reduce its prison population. That extension came with specific requirements, for example, the federal court ordered the state to incorporate more programs like San Francisco's Re-entry Pod to help prepare inmates for release. KALW's Holly Kernan sat down with San Francisco's Chief Adult Probation Officer Wendy Still to discuss some of the changes.

From our partners at Youth Radio

Father and son reunited in prison

Dec 2, 2013
Under CC license from Flickr user foreverdigital

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

Ron Everett has been incarcerated almost 31 years. Everett was arrested soon after the birth of his son, and their relationship became estranged over time.

It’s early. About 5 in the morning and I’m heading south on Highway 5 toward Corcoran, a farming town of about 24,000 people. However, that population count is misleading. About half of the people living in Corcoran are locked up in two of the state’s largest prisons just south of downtown.

Photo courtesy of Rosenberg Foundation

Nationally, women are the fastest growing prison population. And one of the highest female prison populations in the world is here in California. That's slated to change under the state's new realignment program. The number of women in prison is supposed to shrink drastically, by as much as half, over the next few years.

Can people from different political backgrounds come together to work for prison reform? On today's Your Call, we'll have a conversation about various efforts to reform the prison system in the US. Today, 2.3 million prisoners are in US jails, costing more than $44 billion. In California, more money is spent on prisons than education. What will it take to reform the system? How are groups with different political backgrounds joining forces? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you. 

Guests: