infrastructure | KALW

infrastructure

99% Invisible: Public Works

Jan 28, 2018

Infrastructure makes modern civilization possible. Roads, power grids, sewage systems and water networks all underpin society as we know it, forming the basis of our built environment … at least when they work.

Why does the Bay Area have the worst roads in the country?

May 11, 2017
Eli Wirtschafter

Cat Spediacci takes me on a neighborhood tour of crumbling roads. We’re in Richmond, where she’s lived most of her life. Her Volkswagen rumbles over washboard pavement.

“The road is just completely rotten the way it looks,” says Spediacci. “If I had a tire that looked like this, I would replace it. If I had a fruit that looked like this, I wouldn't eat it.”

Minesweeper on May 14, 2005 / Used Under CC / Wikimedia Commons


How does private financing for public infrastructure work?

Daily News Roundup for Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Mar 9, 2016
San José Library, used under CC BY, croppped and resized.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

Mudslide probably caused Bay Area commuter train derailment, railroad official says // LA Times

“A preliminary investigation shows that a mudslide triggered by days of rain probably caused a Bay Area commuter train to derail on Monday night, according to an official of Union Pacific Railroad, which owns the tracks.

Audrey Dilling

 

 

When it’s finished, the Transbay Terminal will be a hub for 11 public transit systems – from Muni to AC Transit to California High Speed Rail – connecting people from all around the state. It’s being touted as the future “Grand Central of the West”. But right now, it’s a big hole in the ground – one that people have to travel around, rather than through.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, October 28

Oct 28, 2015
Flickr User cristiano valli

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

S.F. Fire Department Removes Chief Arson Investigator // KQED News

“The San Francisco Fire Department has removed the head of its arson task force after he voiced repeated public complaints that the unit was understaffed and overwhelmed by hundreds of uncompleted investigations.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14012643775
Under CC license from Flickr user torbakhopper

Since 2008, San Franciscans have signed off on more than two billion dollars worth of bonds. A bond is a loan taken out by the city to pay for big projects. But who keeps track of all that money?

Daily News roundup for Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Jul 22, 2015
Rich Pedroncelli / AP

 

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Supes move forward with jail that we might not need // 48 Hills

"The San Francisco supervisors today moved forward a proposal for a new $240 million county jail – although it’s not clear yet what the project will actually look like or whether the city needs it.

When SF needs money, it holds an auction

Jul 8, 2015
https://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/3952254348/in/photolist-72fkwm-7hymLr-dSscrC-upBmNg-9wN2Lp-6aQr8V-jxTXP-naD1wN-6b6LCY-6xDozM-pomNUV-72buF4-9iSaB3-mb7H4A-72fkp7-7aNztQ-pMkNdX-99i9f8-mHUEVj-q4xaZt-dU5LxT-qJu7ro-dTQGcG-q4QNQ9-q4xafx-qbrqjM-aq9HrW-pX6iLj
Under CC license from Flickr user Wally Gobetz

 

Public infrastructure – parks, libraries, roads, and sidewalks – surrounds us. But have you ever wondered how any of it actually came into being? A lot needs to happen to create a park – from coming up with the idea in the first place, to environmental reviews, construction, and of course, getting the money to pay for it. In San Francisco, funding for these projects needs to be approved by voters, as was the case with 2012’s Proposition B, which gave the city permission to borrow $195 million to renovate parks, including Golden Gate Park

Flickr user toyzrus8

The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water system, operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (PUC), carries water to 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. How it does that is remarkable – remarkably simple, says PUC Water Resources Manager, David Briggs.