Japanese tsunami

http://news.sfsu.edu/voices-japan-exhibit-reflects-tsunami

Since the late 1960s, San Francisco State has continued to be at the forefront of ethnic consciousness – and arts.

An exhibit that opens today, January 31, 2013, at the university is dedicated to the Japanese artform of Tanka, a 31-syllable poetry form that goes as far back as the seventh century. After the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 2011, many Japanese survivors turned to writing Tanka poetry to express their grief, anger, and hope. Thirty of these poems are on exhibit at SF State. KALW’s Hana Baba visited the exhibit recently and brought back this report.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the recent report on the nuclear disaster in Japan. The investigation found that the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power meltdown was "profoundly a man-made disaster that could and should have been foreseen and prevented." What lessons can be taken away from this catastrophe? Join us live at 10 or send an email to feedback@Yourcallradio.org. How are people coping with impacts of radioactive contamination? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

The California coastline is already getting hit by trash and debris from the deadly tsunami that ravaged Japan last year. Oceanographers from Peninsula College say the worst is yet to come. They expect cars, pieces of homes, phone booths, and maybe even a kitchen sink, if it is buoyant enough...