jazz

A mind for Jazz

Feb 13, 2013

Record shop owner Berigan Taylor dropped by KALW to tell Executive Editor (and fellow Jazz fan) Ben Trefny the story behind his little record shop in Oakland. Berigan’s was the inspiration for Michael Chabon’s new novel, Telegraph Avenue.  Taylor is a life-long record collector and still one of the Bay Area’s biggest jazz enthusiasts. As in, he could probably name every musician on every jazz recording you have ever heard.

Courtesy of www.sfjazz.org/

The liner notes to Miles Davis’ classic album “Birth of the Cool” begin like this:

“In jazz, as in other musics, some things are of their time, some ahead of it, while others simply know no time at all.”


Berigan Taylor dropped by KALW to tell Executive Editor (and fellow Jazz fan) Ben Trefny the story behind Berigan’s, a little record shop in Oakland. Berigan’s was the inspiration for Michael Chabon’s new novel, Telegraph Avenue.  Taylor is a life-long record collector and still one of the Bay Area’s biggest jazz enthusiasts. As in, he could probably name every musician on every jazz recording you have ever heard.

Jazz Perspectives: 'Sweet' Sue Terry

Jun 26, 2012
Dan Demetriad

Great Jazz musicians have their own distinct tone. “Sweet” Sue Terry has developed a wonderful open tone with her own style. Terry, who plays saxophone, flute, and clarinet, says that developing your own tone is a work in progress. Most musicians start by listening to someone they really admire and try to recreate that tone. It’s a little like imitating a foreign accent. You listen to someone from another country speaking English, and then try to imitate that with your own voice. She explains:

Jazz pianist is back in town

Jun 18, 2012

Pianist George Cables has an intensely rhythmic style and always comes out swinging. He first became famous as a sideman in the 1970s, playing with such luminaries as Art Blakey and Dexter Gordon.

Some of Cables’ best work in those years came as a sideman with saxophonist Art Pepper. It seems that Cables’ was fond of Pepper. “Art Pepper was a bit eccentric,” says Cables. “He was a great alto player and very warm.”

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