One hot muggy afternoon last week I was at the city office in Kolkata trying to figure out a property tax bill.  After two and a half hours of running from pillar to post, counter to counter, waiting on one official or the other, I understood first hand a fact of life in India – the system never works for you unless you know someone with connections who can, as they say, "manage it for you." But as I was sitting in that office I heard a piece of news that restored my faith...

The number of chronically hungry people in the world is over 800 million, yet developed countries are facing health challenges from rising rates of obesity. The growing problems of food security and water scarcity seem an issue of distribution rather than availability. But other factors also influence the status of food and water security worldwide. So where does the problem with food and water security lie? Do developed countries – or any other entities or individuals – have any moral obligations to ensure a global network of water and food security?

The unexamined year is not worth reviewing:

The Year in Race and Justice with Chris Lebron, Professor of African-American Studies at Yale University and author of The Color Of Our Shame: Race and Justice In Our Time

The Year in Academic Freedom with Katherine Franke, Professor of Law at Columbia University and Director of the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law

On January 1st,  2015 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Bryan Stevenson, author of “Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption” and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. One in every 15 people in the United States is expected to go to jail or prison, and for  black men, the number increases to one in three. How can we generate empathy both for people who have committed crimes and compassion for victims? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Recent advances in neuroscience have revealed that certain neurological disorders, like a brain tumor, can cause an otherwise normal person to behave in criminally deviant ways. Would knowing that an underlying neurological condition had caused criminal behavior change the way we assign moral responsibility and mete out justice? Should it? Is committing a crime with a "normal" biology fundamentally different from doing so with an identifiable brain disorder?

Your Call: Is the bail bond system broken?

May 28, 2014