juvenile justice

What To Do When You Turn 18 -- Juveniles and the Juvenile Justice System.
Guests: Judge Eugene Hyman (Ret.); Richard Halpern, Managing Attorney for the Juvenile Division of San Mateo County's Private Defender Program; and James Wade, Deputy District Attorney in Charge of the Juvenile Unit of the San Mateo County District Attorney's Office.

http://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/

April 18, 2016: Nearly 50 years after In re Gault, the landmark Supreme Court case that gave youth accused of crimes the same due process rights as adults, City Visions examines the current state of California's juvenile justice system.

Youth Radio

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our week-long series on the prison system by talking about juvenile incarceration.

Brett Myers/Youth Radio

For the past year, Youth Radio's Sayre Quevedo and Myles Bess have been investigating the true cost of the U.S. juvenile justice system for a series called Double Charged. They focused their reporting on California, which has the largest overall population of incarcerated youth in the country. 

Brett Myers/Youth Radio

Standing in the hallway outside a hearing room at the Alameda County Juvenile Justice Center, you see benches filled with teenagers and their families–waiting to appear in court– many dressed up in button down shirts and ties, looking their Sunday best. A lot of moms, too, and little brothers and sisters who’d clearly rather be elsewhere.

Many teens are here for trials and probation hearings, but on any given day, others are trying to negotiate fines and fees.

Double Charged: Restitution

Jul 7, 2014
Brett Myers/Youth Radio

Ricky Brum stood with one of my producers in an alleyway behind a furniture store in Manteca, California, and to be honest, it was a little awkward. He didn't really want to be there. Last February Brum set some cardboard boxes on fire just a few feet away.

"Just that right there," he said, pointing to a black spot on the pavement, "Just a little burn mark on the floor."

He explained that one match to the boxes did the trick.

"Like I just sat there and was like bam."

Double Charged: Teens on House Arrest With GPS

Jul 7, 2014
Brett Myers/Youth Radio

Seventeen-year-old Elisa Morris-Jackson is sitting on the couch in sweatpants and a hoodie. It’s seven p.m. and she’s watching the TV show “Dancing With The Stars.” Seven p.m. each evening is also the time when about 130 other juvenile offenders in Alameda County, California are required to plug in and sit down for their mandatory two-hour battery charge.

“I’m going to be so excited to get this thing off of me,” she said.

From our partners at Youth Radio

From our partners at Youth Radio.

Tina Hayes School of Etiquette Class

California has been in an ongoing struggle trying to figure out how to deal with overcrowding in prisons. The problems extend to the Division of Juvenile Justice, where the state’s most serious young offenders are held. For youth from Alameda County, being sent to one of the DJJ facilities is one of the worst alternatives. They’re spread out all over the state, which means it can be hard to keep family connections, and complaints of abuse and unsafe conditions have dogged the system for more than a decade.

A recent study by the Black Organizing Project, Public Counsel, and the ACLU, shows  that the police presence in Oakland schools has a negative impact on students. School policing isn’t a new topic but since the Newtown, Connecticut school shooting, administrators and school officials have been pushing for even more police presence in schools. But statistics show that the police aren’t helping.

Youth Radio: Staying off probation, and teaching others how

Aug 22, 2013

In 2008, Reinaldi Gilder promised himself that he would never go back to jail. Since his release in December of that year, he’s not only managed to keep his word, he has also shown others that they can do the same.

It was a little past seven o’clock on a late summer morning in Fremont, California, and 18-year-old D was already running late. At six-foot-one, with black hair and designer glasses, he looks like an Indian version of Clark Kent. It was an important occasion for D, which by the way, isn’t really his name. He asked not to be identified, since that would have defeated the entire purpose of what he was trying to do that day.

Juvenile Law issues.

Jun 10, 2013

Your Legal Rights considers Juvenile Law Issues.

Guests:  

Judge Eugene Hyman (retired) and Judge Kurt Kumli of the Santa Clara Co. Superior Court;
Deputy District Attorney LaRon Hogg Haught, Santa Clara Co.; and Greg Feldman, Deputy
Public Defender, San Francisco. 

Listener call-ins welcome beginning approximately 7:30: 415-841-4134. 

Making sense of California youth sentences

Oct 18, 2012

For juveniles in California being sentenced for crimes, things just got a little more complicated. Proposition 21 requires mandatory minimums for juveniles that often translate into long sentences. In California alone, there are hundreds of inmates serving juvenile sentences totaling between 50 and 200 years. Advocates argue that these sentences are the equivalent of life without parole. This summer, the State Supreme Court agreed and ruled that unusually long sentences for juveniles unconstitutional.

Photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/sarae/

It’s widely assumed that most crimes committed by juveniles are sealed or expunged when the person turns 18, but that’s far from the case. In most states young people have to apply to seal their record, which can involve bureaucratic hurdles, fees and court appearances. Youth Radio spoke to Rourke Stacy, who has worked for the Los Angeles  County’s Public Defender’s Office for nearly 11 years, as a felony trial lawyer, and an attorney doing juvenile delinquency trial work.

Turnstyle: How informed do you think the public is about sealing records?

Photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/sarae/

It’s widely assumed that most crimes committed by juveniles are sealed or expunged when the person turns 18, but that’s far from the case. In most states young people have to apply to seal their record, which can involve bureaucratic hurdles, fees and court appearances. Youth Radio spoke to Rourke Stacy, who has worked for the Los Angeles  County’s Public Defender’s Office for nearly 11 years, as a felony trial lawyer, and an attorney doing juvenile delinquency trial work.

Turnstyle: How informed do you think the public is about sealing records?

In 2005, California's juvenile prison system got a face lift. The name changed from CYA, short for California Youth Authority, to the Division of Juvenile Justice or DJJ. And many policies began to change along with the name.

For more than thirty years, it's been Barry Krisberg's priority to fight for reforms in California's state juvenile correctional facilities, known as the California Youth Authority (CYA) or Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). And now a change is coming at the DJJ. 

Courtesy of turnstylenews.com

Back in 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that sentencing juveniles to life without parole for any crimes besides murder is cruel and unusual punishment.This week the high court took another look at life in prison, except this time for juveniles under the age of 14 convicted of homicide.

NPR reports that currently 79 people are serving life terms for crimes committed when they were 14 or younger. Justice Anthony Kennedy is expected to be the deciding vote on a decision expected by early summer.

Courtesy of Flickr user Shawn Thorpe.

This week, US Supreme Court took up the issue of life without parole for juvenile offenders. The question for the justices is whether children who commit murder should have the chance at some point in their lives to prove they should be let free.

Rina Palta

A note to readers and listeners: only the first names of children are used in this story.

Christian is 15 years old. And like many teenagers, he’s made some mistakes. “Kinda stupid stuff,” he says. “Like vandalism. Not necessarily graffiti or anything. But yeah. Vandalism.”

And he got caught.

“It’s funny, one little incident can change everybody’s opinion of you,” Christian says. “Like, everybody. At school, like the teachers, from the students, to your family and stuff. But I try not to look at it as a negative or anything.”