Svetlana Cvetko

 On the November 12th edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss modern day capitalism.


On the September 16th edition of  Your Call, author Caroline Fredrickson joins us to talk about her new book Under the Bus, How working women are being run over.

Peiyu Liu / flickr

 Have longer hours and more responsibilities become the new norm in the American workplace? 

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

City of Oakland

More than three months after Oakland implemented a higher minimum wage, the city is working to enforce the new law. Yet, job postings have been placed on Craigslist advertising positions that pay below the legal minimum wage of $12.25 per hour, some receiving dozens of applications. How is the city responding to this kind of confusion?

Prospects for a regional minimum wage

Jun 24, 2015
Cecille Isidro

KALW's Jack Detsch spoke with opponents and proponents of a regional minimum wage in the Bay Area. He and Hana Baba sat down to talk about at what's next.

On June 16th edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about why the House recently rejected President Obama’s secret trade agenda. More than 2000 civil society organizations including labor, and environmental groups, have campaigned against the TPP. They argue that it will harm workers in the US and abroad and will over rides domestic laws. What do you want to know about the TPP? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.


Dean Baker, macro economist, and co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research

Angela Johnston

On April 1st, the lunch line at the Golden Corral Buffet in Tracy snaked out the door. It was full of people who hadn’t seen each other in over five years.

City Visions: Fighting for Fifteen in the Bay Area

May 26, 2015

Host David Onek and guests discuss the Bay Area's Fight for Fifteen labor movement. Is a $15/hour minimum wage on the horizon for fast food and other low wage workers? Will fast food workers unionize?  And what do rising regional minimum wages mean for the movement?


-Jenny Lin, Deputy Director of East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy, an Oakland non-profit dedicated to advancing economic, racial, and social justice in the East Bay.

Library of Congress

March 31 is César Chávez Day. Chávez is remembered as a champion of migrant workers who harvest the nation’s food. He helped create the United Farmworkers Union; He led boycotts, marches, and protests - fought for fair wages for farmworkers. Today, we aired an episode of BackStory with The American History Guys that’s all about the fair wage. And a note to our listeners, this program was made in 2014, so references go back to the original air date.

To listen to the original episode of BackStory, visit their website

Living Wage: Profile of a low-wage earner

Mar 16, 2015
D'Wana Stewart

D’Wana Stewart is a native San Franciscan. She graduated from June Jordan School for Equity, a small high school on the southeast side of the city. Now 24, she's working three jobs and shares a home with her mother – it’s the only way she’s been able to stay in San Francisco. We spent a week with D’wana, to get a sense of her life, living on the minimum wage.


Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

Jack Alley for The New York Times

Sharing economy companies like Uber and Lyft have become a powerful part of the economy. Now, some of the workers propelling that sector are organizing to ask for more from the companies that pay them. Drivers from both companies have filed a lawsuit -- they want to be made employees rather than contractors, and receive the benefits mandated by the state of California.

The way we make a living is changing. For about a third of Americans, regular hours and benefits are giving way to a patchwork of contracting, temping, and moonlighting.

On the February 6th edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss the declining coverage of labor in the media. As the declining middle class, income inequality and wage stagnation have become big issues, who is focusing on the state of organized labor and why does it matter? We will also discuss the political crisis in Jordan. We will be joined by Steven Greenhouse, former NY Time’s labor reporter, and Guardian’s Martin Chulov. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.


Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought: Big storm on the way for Northern California // Contra Costa Times

"After the driest January in recorded history, the Bay Area is back in the rain business.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Jan 27, 2015
Leah Millis / San Francisco Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. // SF Gate

"If it seems that San Franciscans are getting more entitled and self-absorbed, a series of psychology studies performed at UC Berkeley indicates there could be a scientific reason: the city’s increasing wealth.

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

Contingent, adjunct or part-time professors make up the majority of faculty nationwide, yet many labor under difficult if not harsh conditions -- including low pay, lack of resources and minimal job security. As the slogan goes, teachers’ working conditions are students’ learning conditions. What is this emergent labor movement working to make visible, transform and achieve?

Producer: Zara Zimbardo


- Maria Maisto, president, New Faculty Majority

(Rich Pedroncelli / AP)



On the October 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss bills that impact everything from labor and education to groundwater and healthcare. Governor Brown just signed the country’s first ban on single-use plastic bags. He also signed bills to give workers 3 sick days a year, redefine sexual consent on college campuses, and extend housing to foster youth up to age 25 if they are completing a secondary education. What bills are you watching? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Ben Trefny


In the late 1990s and early 2000s, San Francisco passed a variety of measures to help low wage workers try to keep up with the rising cost of living. The city now has the highest minimum wage in the country at 10 dollars 74 cents an hour. It also requires employers to either provide health benefits or pay into a pool so the city can cover their health care costs.

On September 1st edition of Your Call, on Labor Day, we’ll have a conversation with Simon Cordery, author of “Mother Jones: Raising Cain and Consciousness.” In 1902, she was called the most dangerous woman in America for her effective and creative labor organizing. How did she organize workers in early 20th century? And want can what can we learn from her activism? It’s Your Call, with me Rose Aguilar.


Simon Cordery, chair of the History Department at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois.

Your Call: Is tipping good for workers?

Aug 13, 2014




On the August 13th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the history and cultural practice of tipping. The federal tipped minimum wage is only $2.13 an hour, and tipped workers are 3 times as likely to live in poverty. Is working for tips a way to boost compensation for great service? Or does it open the door for exploitation, by employers and customers? If you work for tips, would you prefer an alternative? It’s Your Call, with Matt Martin, and you.


A mile-high look at modern US history. Is it true most male flight attendants are gay? Was it ever? How did their legal battles with airlines help advance gay rights and workplace gender equity? Is the tale of “Patient Zero” – a steward accused of being the initial transcontinental spreader of HIV – accurate? Stow your tray tables and put your seats in their fully upright and locked positions for a quick flight through the history of airline stewards. Eric Jansen's guest is Philadelphia University history professor Phil Tiemeyer, author of Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality and AIDS in the history of male flight attendants, published by University of California Press.

Isabel Angell

Over half of Bay Area residents support a ban on transit strikes, bucking the region’s pro-union reputation, reveals a new Field Poll. The rest of the state is split, but more Californians still believe public transit workers should have the right to strike.

Labor Notes