Latino

Laura Klivans

Over the past few years, San Francisco has been getting a lot of press about the tensions in our quickly changing city. It all seems to be magnified in San Francisco’s Mission District: a sunny destination with a growing number of expensive restaurants and rent prices. It’s a neighborhood where Mark Zuckerberg now owns a home, and a place where an affluent, whiter population is displacing lower-income residents, many of them Latino.

Sara Brooke Curtis

Every place has a history hidden that lives beneath what you can see on the surface. Just take the Mission District. The Bart Station at 24th street and Mission is called Plaza Sandino by some -- because in the 1980’s Pro-Sandanista protesters would rally there. Right down the street, Potrero del Sol Park is better known to those who grew up here as La Raza park -- back in the 70’s it was a major gathering spot for low rider cars. This neighborhood has also been called the birthplace of Latin Rock.

US Census / US Census

It’s hard to define individual identity. For example, if you're Spanish speaking, what do you call yourself? Latino? Hispanic? Something else? Berkeley professor G. Cristina Mora dug into the  history of what Spanish speakers were called in America in her new book 'Making Hispanics: How Activists, Bureaucrats and Media constructed a New American.' It tells the story of how and when Spanish speakers in America got their own ethnic category on the US census, and what that iconic moment led to. G. Cristina Mora joined Hana Baba in studio, and Mora told her that story. 

Reaching out to Latino youth

Jun 2, 2014

Oakland Unified School District spokesperson Troy Flint said that in order to make sure all students succeed, OUSD needs to target and support the most vulnerable. “By most measures African American males are performing the worst, relative to other demographic groups,” he said. That is why in 2010 the Oakland Unified School District launched its African American Male Achievement project to support young black men academically.

But students from other demographic groups could also benefit from targeted programs.

Courtesy of Radio Ambulante

In February 2013, Radio Ambulante put on a live show in New York City. We presented some of our best stories from our pilot season in English and Spanish, but we kicked off the evening with a conversation between novelists Junot Díaz and Francisco Goldman and Radio Ambulante's Executive Producer Daniel Alarcón.

This conversation is about the art of translation, on what it's like to write stories about Latinos in English, and about the relationship each author has with Latin America.

Note: this conversation contains explicit language.

 

Radio Ambulante is the new Spanish-language podcast produced at KALW showcasing compelling human stories from around Latin America and the U.S.  Now you can hear the program's first English-language special, including the story of a young Honduran living through the 2009 coup in his country and the true tale of the fictional character behind the controversial phrase "self-deportatio

San Francisco State University

San Francisco has pioneered many concepts for the country. One of them is recognizing the importance of a college education that’s diverse, and multicultural, reflecting the populace. And so, the country’s first Department of Ethnic Studies was launched at San Francisco State University in 1968.

Living in San Francisco, one becomes familiar with the variety in culture, each one seeming to have its own neighborhood. For Hispanics and Latinos, this neighborhood is the Mission.