literature

Every immigrant has a coming to the America memory. Nayomi Munaweera came to America when she was 12. It was the mid eighties. And Duran Duran.

at the Kolkata Literary Meet
Sandip Roy

The book “The year of the Runaways” was shortlisted for a Man Booker. But Sunjeev is an unlikely storyteller. he’d never read a novel until he was 18. 

The Book Report: Amy Berkowitz

Mar 28, 2016
Cal Tabuena-Frolli

In The Book Report series, KALW talks to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Tyler Vile's Never Coming Home from Amy Berkowitz, a writer living in San Francisco.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Katherine Dunn's Geek Love from Charlie Jane Anders, a writer living in San Francisco. Anders is the editor-in-chief of io9.com and runs the Writers with Drinks series. She's also the author of the novel All the Birds in the Sky.

CAL TABUENA-FROLLI

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News!  

San Francisco may cut ties with Chevron, and libraries are involved

CAL TABUENA-FROLLI

Bay Area Book World Breaking News!  

    

Coloring books!

CAL TABUENA-FROLLI

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News!  

The Book Report: Natalie Baszile

Jan 6, 2016
Courtesy Natalie Baszile, Facebook.com

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about they books they love. Today we hear about Amy Bloom's Away from Natalie Baszile, a writer living in San Francisco. 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim from Katherine Ellison, a writer living in San Anselmo. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

Courtesy of Anne Nesbet

For the Book Report we ask Bay Area writers to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Berkeley-based writer Anne Nesbet, as she discusses The Wicked and the Just, by J. Anderson Coats.

CAL TABUENA-FROLLI

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Sandip Roy gets virtually stranded in Bangladesh at the Dhaka Lit. Fest.

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

 

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

                                                 Bay Area Book World Breaking News 

  For The Book Report we ask Bay Area writers to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Oakland based author Mariko Tamaki, who is discussing Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye. 

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. 
Alan Leggitt

When I first started working at The Booksmith, the local independent bookstore a couple blocks from my apartment, it was a lot like what I expected it to be. Book lovers browsed, regulars came in for their daily newspaper, and authors gave intimate readings. So it came as a surprise when one night all the shelves in the back were pushed aside, two hundred or so people filed in, and Baruch Porras-Hernandez welcomed the crowd enthusiastically with: “Are you guys ready for some porn? Let’s dive in!” 

Crayon Crunch

Think about some of the classics of children’s literature. There’s Where the Wild Things Are...Goodnight Moon...and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. Those are just a few books that have shaped the lives of many Americans. What do all these books have in common? They’re all about white people. And what do most children’s books have in common? They’re almost all about white people. Actually, just 10% of children's books published in the last 21 years are about people of color.  But a Berkeley-based children’s book company called Crayon Crunch wants to help change that. They’re publishing a book where parents and children can pick what the main character looks like. But what do kids think of having characters who look like them? And can one book really change the diversity problems in an entire publishing industry? 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Kevin Smokler shared his pick - The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

When I moved to Calcutta from San Francisco,  I’d often marvel, that for a city of 4 and half million, everyone seems to know everyone.  But writer Prajwal Parajuly is from a town so small that everyone really does know everyone.

Prajwel Parajuly will be reading from his book "Land Where I Flee" at bay Area Festival of Books on June 6, and Kepler's in Menlo Park on June 8th.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Cara Black shared her pick - The Lover, by Marguerite Duras - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Philosophy Talk asks: How does Fiction shape us?

May 22, 2015

A good novel can do many things. It can distract us from the humdrum of daily existence, stimulate our imaginations, and delight us with its creative use of language. But isn’t there something more we gain from engaging with fictional worlds and characters? Do we, for example, use literary texts to morally improve ourselves? Is there some deeper truth we’re supposed to learn from a good novel? Or do we use fiction to fine-tune certain cognitive capacities?

The Book Report : Peter Orner

May 11, 2015

For The Book Report we ask Bay Area authors to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Bay Area writer Peter Orner.

I think this book will challenge anybody to see any individual, whoever they are, whether they live on the streets or not, in a much deeper way.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Barbara Comyns's Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead from Colin Winnette, a writer living in San Francisco. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of the Bay Area’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

 

Sam Spade is the private eye in The Maltese Falcon, the San Francisco detective novel that’s been mystifying readers for almost a century. Dashiell Hammett’s hard-boiled page turner came out in 1930. In it, detective Sam Spade gets caught up in a frantic search for a mysterious gold and jewel encrusted statuette known as the Maltese Falcon. The bird has been covered with a layer of black enamel to mask its true value.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

In 2014, small press Timeless, Infinite Light published an anthology of poetry called “It’s Night in San Francisco but it’s Sunny in Oakland.” It is a collective memory of the winter of 2011, Oscar Grant Plaza, Oakland: the site of the encampments and acts of resistance staked in solidarity with Occupy Wall street.

 

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

Once if you wanted to be an Indian city of any standing, you were measured by flyovers, specialty hospitals or multiplexes. These days you are measured by literary festivals.  

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