literature

CAL TABUENA-FROLLI

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Sandip Roy gets virtually stranded in Bangladesh at the Dhaka Lit. Fest.

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

 

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

Bay Area Book World Breaking News

Written on the Dock of the Bay is your weekly guide to literary and bookish happenings in the pleasantly literary and bookish Bay Area.  

 

                                                 Bay Area Book World Breaking News 

  For The Book Report we ask Bay Area writers to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Oakland based author Mariko Tamaki, who is discussing Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye. 

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. 

Alan Leggitt

When I first started working at The Booksmith, the local independent bookstore a couple blocks from my apartment, it was a lot like what I expected it to be. Book lovers browsed, regulars came in for their daily newspaper, and authors gave intimate readings. So it came as a surprise when one night all the shelves in the back were pushed aside, two hundred or so people filed in, and Baruch Porras-Hernandez welcomed the crowd enthusiastically with: “Are you guys ready for some porn? Let’s dive in!” 

Crayon Crunch

Think about some of the classics of children’s literature. There’s Where the Wild Things Are...Goodnight Moon...and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. Those are just a few books that have shaped the lives of many Americans. What do all these books have in common? They’re all about white people. And what do most children’s books have in common? They’re almost all about white people. Actually, just 10% of children's books published in the last 21 years are about people of color.  But a Berkeley-based children’s book company called Crayon Crunch wants to help change that. They’re publishing a book where parents and children can pick what the main character looks like. But what do kids think of having characters who look like them? And can one book really change the diversity problems in an entire publishing industry? 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Kevin Smokler shared his pick - The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

When I moved to Calcutta from San Francisco,  I’d often marvel, that for a city of 4 and half million, everyone seems to know everyone.  But writer Prajwal Parajuly is from a town so small that everyone really does know everyone.

Prajwel Parajuly will be reading from his book "Land Where I Flee" at bay Area Festival of Books on June 6, and Kepler's in Menlo Park on June 8th.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Cara Black shared her pick - The Lover, by Marguerite Duras - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Philosophy Talk asks: How does Fiction shape us?

May 22, 2015

A good novel can do many things. It can distract us from the humdrum of daily existence, stimulate our imaginations, and delight us with its creative use of language. But isn’t there something more we gain from engaging with fictional worlds and characters? Do we, for example, use literary texts to morally improve ourselves? Is there some deeper truth we’re supposed to learn from a good novel? Or do we use fiction to fine-tune certain cognitive capacities?

The Book Report : Peter Orner

May 11, 2015

For The Book Report we ask Bay Area authors to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Bay Area writer Peter Orner.

I think this book will challenge anybody to see any individual, whoever they are, whether they live on the streets or not, in a much deeper way.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Barbara Comyns's Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead from Colin Winnette, a writer living in San Francisco. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of the Bay Area’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

In 2014, small press Timeless, Infinite Light published an anthology of poetry called “It’s Night in San Francisco but it’s Sunny in Oakland.” It is a collective memory of the winter of 2011, Oscar Grant Plaza, Oakland: the site of the encampments and acts of resistance staked in solidarity with Occupy Wall street.

 

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

Once if you wanted to be an Indian city of any standing, you were measured by flyovers, specialty hospitals or multiplexes. These days you are measured by literary festivals.  

Max Pringle

 

John Steinbeck, the author of such classics as “the Grapes of Wrath” and “Of Mice and Men” was born to a middle class family in a beautiful, turreted Victorian on Central Avenue in Salinas, California. Guides lead tours around the house, describing the period decor and sharing stories.  

Writer and editor Julia Scott used to think that only her best work was fit for public consumption; that’s before she started taking part in a reading series called “Regreterature: when good writers go bad” --

 

So you want to open a bookstore? Excellent news. Here's your guide to survival:

Remixing Reality on Philosophy Talk

Aug 16, 2014

For decades, literary critics have been questioning the relevance of the novel as a literary form, with some going so far as to declare its death. But if the novel is dead, it’s not clear what new form can take its place. Should we treat the popularity of the memoir as a sign that what readers want is more truth, less fiction? Or is the memoir, like ‘reality TV,’ mostly just fiction dressed up as fact? In these fragmented times, when everything has already been said or done before, can there be any truly original innovations in art and literature?

Marzena Pogorzaly

A recent tongue-in-cheek blog post on the website Publishing Perspectives listed some 17 must-haves in diasporan South Asian fiction published in the west – arranged marriage, identity crisis, wise grandma, abusive father, colorful fabrics. Writer Prajwal Parajuly says his book The Gurkha’s Daughter checks some of those boxes....

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Anisse Gross shared her pick - The Abortion - by Richard Brautigan, with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

While a young housewife with kids in the 1950s and ’60s, Ann Bannon was a paperback writer of lesbian love stories. Scorned by the literary elite, her and other authors’ pulp fiction helped build the gay rights movement, and reading them now gives us a historical glimpse into gay and lesbian life in those times. Monica Nolan just finished the fourth book in her Lesbian Career-Girl series, spoofs of 1960s high school girls’ career primers that humorously pay homage to lesbian pulp fiction like Ann’s from last century. They both join host Eric Jansen live tonight. We’ll also hear from comedy writer and actor Bruce Vilanch, now starring in 42nd Street Moon’s production of the 1939 musical Du Barry Was A Lady. Did you know he wrote a disco song for Eartha Kitt? You'll hear about that, too, in this special hour-long edition of Out in the Bay.

Isabel Allende is one of Latin America's most beloved writers -- and she happens to call the Bay Area her home. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, the author has lived in Marin County for 26 years now. During that time, Allende has produced an incredible amount of work -- since her bestselling novel The House of Spirits was published in 1982, she's written 19 more books, which have sold more than 60 million copies worldwide.

Lesbian Pulp Fiction, 21st Century Style

Apr 3, 2014

  

San Francisco writer Monica Nolan has just completed the fourth book in her saucy Lesbian Career Girl series. With titles like “Lois Lenz, Lesbian Secretary," “Bobby Blanchard, Lesbian Gym Teacher” and “Maxie Mainwaring, Lesbian Dilletante,” they’re spoofs of 1950s and ‘60s career primers for high school girls, and humorous homages to lesbian pulp fiction of the same era – often-maligned literature that helped build the gay rights movement. Join Nolan with Out in the Bay host Eric Jansen as they read selections from her racy fiction -- including a sneak peek from her yet-to-be-released "Dolly Dingle, Lesbian Landlady" --  and discuss how historically-set novels and film document the changes in societal norms and LGBT rights over the years. (Aired April 3)

National Poetry Month on Philosophy Talk

Apr 3, 2014

April is National Poetry Month, so a philosopher might ask: what is poetry? Mere word play? A pretty, or at any rate striking, way of expressing thought and emotion? Or does great poetry involve an approach to the world that provides insight and information not available in other ways? John and Ken explore how poetry can illuminate what we know with award-winning poet Jane Hirshfield, author of Come, Thief and other poetic works of philosophical richness.

Sister Spit's 2014 tour kicks off March 19 in San Francisco! Award-winning writers Michelle Tea and Ali Liebegott (Sister Spit co-founder and long-time contributor respectively) fill us in on the San Francisco-based queer feminist writers cabaret that traverses the USA and other countries spreading queer culture. They also read from their latest books: Michelle Tea's is Mermaid in Chelsea Creek; Ali Liebegott's is Cha-Ching! ; Michelle also reads from the anthology Sister Spit: Writing, Rants and Reminiscence from the Road. Eric Jansen hosts. 

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