live music

3:05pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Arts & Culture

Today's local music: Slim Jenkins

Slim Jenkins
Slim Jenkins promo photo

If you’re looking for old-style Voodoo Blues and swing, look no further than Slim Jenkins.

The group is part of this spring’s “Swing in the Square” dance and concert series. They play a free show on Wednesday 24, April, at San Francisco’s Union Square.

Dance lessons are at 7pm, with Slim Jenkins taking the stage at 8pm.

According to Slim Jenkins' website, the band is a celebration of great American roots music.

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11:39am

Tue June 19, 2012
Arts & Culture

Today's Local Music: The Famous

the famous/website

That’s not Wilco you’re hearing, and it’s not Tom Waits either, although you might detect elements of both is this song by The Famous.

They’ve been perfecting their “raw country meets post punk” sound at live shows throughout the Bay Area since 2003.

You can hear The Famous  Sunday, June 24th  at 4pm in San Francisco at Thee Parkside.

5:12pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Arts & Culture

KALW's On-Air Folk Festival this Saturday 3 to 8 pm

KALW's Saturday music hosts join forces to present a five-hour folk extravaganza of continuous live music performed  by some of the Bay Area's finest talent.   Enjoy the Scottish fiddling of Alasdair Fraser, the powerhouse vocals of Teresa Trull and Barbara Higbie, the original songs of Caren Armstrong, and the homegrown bluegrass of Them Boys and the Sycamore Slough String Band.  Here's the schedule:

 

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1:44pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Arts & Culture

Century-old ballet still pushing boundaries

Sonsheree Giles, Was It A Dream I Loved
Heike Liss

One hundred years ago, on a late May evening in Paris, an 11-minute ballet so scandalized audiences that it’s still making waves today.

“Afternoon of a Faun” was choreographed by then-23-year-old Vaslav Nijinsky for the Ballet Russes. The dancers were barefoot and the angular movements of the dance rejected the formal constraints of classical ballet. Then there was the issue of the subject matter, which was overtly sexual in a way that audiences of the time had never seen. 

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