The Marsh

Jim Norrena

  This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with playwright Patricia Milton and composer Caroline Altman about their original musical comedy “Moments of Truth,” being staged by 3Girls Theatre Company;  Mugwumpin co-founders Christopher White and Joe Estlack talk about their two-man take-down of the Hollywood disaster film genre at the Intersection for the Arts - "Blockbuster Season;" Smuin Ballet's Artistic Director Celia Fushille shares details about the dance company’s new season; and Ann Randolph talks about her acclaimed solo show “Loveland,” which returns to The Marsh.  Plus, arts contributor Dianne Keogh with an update on cultural offerings on the peninsula.  

Open Air with David Latulippe; heard live on September 24, 2015 at 1pm. Listen now orr anytime...

David Ford

At the Marsh Theater, you’ll find a man named Geoff Doyle trying a new approach to William Shakespeare's King Lear. The original play is the story of a king who decides to divide his kingdom amongst his three daughters by testing their loyalty -- and ends up making some bad decisions in the process.

How reliable are our Intuitions?

Aug 29, 2014

Turns out that Galileo was right and Aristotle was wrong: in a vacuum, a feather and a bowling ball will fall from a tall building at exactly the same speed. This is not to say that Aristotle wasn’t a brilliant thinker; empirical evidence shows he just had a wrong intuition. Even the most powerful intuitions we have can be misleading. Why is it, then, that many philosophers treat them as crucial when arguing for a conclusion? Can intuitions lead us to important truths about the world, or do they merely teach us about ourselves?

The Marsh- SF


Dezi Gallegos is a playwright who is searching for God. He's only 18 years old, but says he's already lived through numerous tough life experiences that led to him asking the question: is there a loving God? And if so, why are these bad things  plagues, he calls them  happening to me and my family? 

Photo: Diana Blackwell

This week, conversations with playwright Dezi Gallegos about his one-man show at the Marsh, "God Fights The Plague", and with Christopher White from Mugwumpin.  We’ll also hear about the Smith/Wymore Disappearing Acts piece "Number Zero: A Space Opera" at CounterPulse, and get an overview of the 38th Frameline Film Festival from Des Buford, Frameline’s Director of Exhibitions & Programming.  Plus Peter Robinson reviews Modernism at the deYoung and offers a movie review of "Chef".  Open Air with David Latulippe ~ 6/19/14 at 1pm.

David Allen

This week on Open Air, guest host Sarah Cahill talks to Artistic Director Celia Fushille from Smuin Ballet about the remaining Bay Area performances of XXCentric, part of Smuin's  Spring Dance Series which closes out the company's 20th Anniversary Season;  solo performer Mark Kenward shares stories from 'Nantucket',  his memoir and solo performance about growing up on the fabled island, currently at the Marsh Berkeley;  Dianne Keogh offers her reviews on theater offerings from the Peninsula and regular contributor Peter Robinson has a literary take on gun culture in the American language.  Open Air, originally broadcast on 22 May 2014 at 1pm. Listen now or anytime...

Christina McNeill

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks to Bay Area playwright Kathy Rucker about her new play Crystal Springs, which will receive its world premiere at the Eureka Theatre this month, and deals with the challenges of parenting in the digital age; Music Director and Conductor Duane Carroll shares details about the Contra Costa Wind Symphony’s upcoming Spring Concert titled Mountains & Canyons; solo performer Jill Vice discusses her “Best of Fringe” award-winning show, Tipped & Tipsy, currently running at The Marsh SF; and San Francisco Chronicle's classical music critic Joshua Kosman shares his classical music picks for the month of March.  Open Air with David Latulippe, originally broadcast on Thursday March 6, 2014 at 1pm. Listen now or anytime...

SF Chronicle

This week, host David Latulippe talks with SFArtsED artistic director, Emily Keeler about the young cast involved in the upcoming production of L'il Abner at the Eureka Theatre; jazz vocalist Paula West shares details about her gig at Feinstein’s at the Nikko; Lisa Steindler, Artistic Director of Z Space talks about  the world premiere of Hundred Days, a folk rock odyssey conceived and composed by The Bengsons; and San Francisco playwright and performer Charlie Varon talks about his solo comedy show ‘Feisty Old Jew’ at The Marsh SFOpen Air with David Latulippe, originally broadcast on February 20, 2014 at 1pm. Listen now or anytime.

Photo: David Allen

This week, host David Latulippe talks to actresses Jamie Jones and Stacy Ross about their roles, respectively as mother and teacher in Gidion’s Knot, now playing at the Aurora Theatre in Berkeley; we have a backstage visit with pianist Hélène Grimaud, who is in town to play the Brahms piano concerto no 1 with the San Francisco Symphony;  performer/comedian Marga Gomez talks about her tenth solo play, Lovebirds, currently presented at The Marsh SF; and San Francisco Chronicle's classical music critic Joshua Kosman shares his classical music picks for the month ahead. 

Open Air with David Latulippe; originally broadcast on Thursday, February 6, 2014 at 1pm.

 The changing face of San Francisco is a source of controversy for many locals. In his latest one-man show, "Feisty Old Jew," local performer Charlie Varon demonstrates how the issue can be a solid source of comedy too. 

Sarah Roland

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks to Liberty Bradford Mitchell, oldest daughter of Artie Mitchell, one of San Francisco’s infamous Mitchell Brothers. She tells the story of growing up on the fringes of an X-rated world in The Pornographer’s Daughter, now being produced at Z Below. Director Yury Urnov and actor David Sinaiko share details about the Cutting Ball’s production of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi, a parody of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, which is considered a precursor to Surrealism and the Theatre of the Absurd. Plus, award-winning actor Brian Copeland is on the show to talk about the world premiere of his solo show The Scion, opening at The Marsh. It is a tale of privilege, murder, and...sausage. Also, the music of local singer/songwriter Matt Montgomery, which will be featured in a special concert with the Awesome Orchestra, this Sunday in Oakland. Open Air with David Latulippe, originally broadcast on January 23, 2014 at 1pm. Listen now or anytime.

Marga Gomez' "Lovebirds"

Jan 14, 2014

One of the first 'out' comics, award-winning solo performer Marga Gomez talks with Marilyn Pittman about her 10th solo show, "Lovebirds," running January 23rd-March 15th at The Marsh in San Francisco's Mission District. A G.L.A.A.D. award-winner, Marga has been seen on Logo, HBO, Showtime, and PBS. They'll talk about the early days of comedy and the new show full of wacky lovers chasing love.  7pm Pacific, Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Kevin Berne

This week, host David Latulippe talks with actor and vaudevillian Geoff Hoyle about his solo-performance “Geezer” which is back at The Marsh SF; Tony Award winning director Frank Galati discusses his adaptation of the musical  “1776” currently at ACT, and acoustical consultant Josh Cushner talks about his upcoming workshop on Acoustic Wayfinding, developed together with blind architect Chris Downey, about how to improve architectural design in such a way that the visually impaired can successfully navigate buildings without exclusively relying on technology. Plus, regular contributor Peter Robinson shares his memories of poet Seamus Heany and broadcaster David Frost.  Open Air, originally broadcast on Thursday, September 19 at 1pm. Listen now or anytime.

photo: David Allen

Political comedian Will Durst is turning his attention to the home stretch of the presidential election.

The opinions of Will Durst do not necessarily reflect those of KALW News. Every Tuesday night, you can find Durst at the Marsh Theater in San Francisco’s Mission District putting on his one-man show called “Elect to Laugh.”

In the era of Mike Daisey making up facts for his stories about Apple factory workers in China, or the uproar over the motives behind the recent KONY video, we have to start asking ourselves how real these real world videos really are. What’s going on outside the frame of a YouTube video? What’s true? And, who decides?

How does a comic deal with personal tragedy? On this week's Out in the Bay, hosts Marilyn Pittman and Eric Jansen play excerpts from Marilyn's solo show, "It's All the Rage," about her parents’ 1997 murder-suicide, and talk about rage, PTSD, gender roles, and how humor, friends and her wife helped her survive.