media

Under CC license from Flickr user Charlie Nguyen.

The University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious in the country. It’s not cheap: it costs more than $15,000 per year for California residents and twice that for out-of-state students. And last month, the Board of Regents made it even more expensive, charging an extra $7,500 per year. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Master OSM 2011

KALW's Ben Trefny talks with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Dean Ed Wasserman about how social media and the page views are impacting newsrooms.

ED WASSERMAN: There was a lot of talk about citizen journalists, and the like, but this is really more about citizen editors. And in many respects, that editorial function is a far more powerful and a far more influential one than the actual reporting.

Click the audio player above to listen to the complete interview.

Under CC license from Flickr user Thierry Chervel.

KALW's Ben Trefny talks with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Dean Ed Wasserman about how terrorist attacks on media, the use of satire, and free speech.

  

On the December 17th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with author and journalist Gail Sheehy about her new memoir, “Daring: My Passages”. Sheehy blazed a trail into journalism when it was still considered a "man's world".  Today only 15% of opinion pieces are written by women and last year only 64% of bylines and on-camera appearances went to men. So what will it take to change these statistics? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest:

On the October 1st, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll rebroadcast a conversation with makers of Hollow, an interactive documentary that examines the future of rural America through the eyes and voices of those living in McDowell County, West Virginia.  Viewers can scroll through and click on photos, videos, and timelines to experience an in-depth portrait of this area and its people. What’s the power of technology to enhance news and storytelling? Join us on the next Your Call with me, Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

From the August 15,2014 edition of the Your Call media roundtable:  Stories recommended by panelists Jonathan Landay, national security and intelligence reporter for McClatchy Newspapers; Martin Chulov, Middle East correspondent for The Guardian; and David Barstow, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times.


Courtesy of SFGate

The San Francisco Chronicle has undergone radical transformations over the last several years. It has had to. In 2009, its readership dropped faster than any other newspaper in the country – 50 percent in just three years. While its reporters continue to win awards for their investigative journalism, the number of people actually reading that work in the paper has declined precipitously.

Today on Your Call: Media Coverage of Climate Change

Jan 2, 2014


On today's Your Call, we revisit a conversation with longtime media reform advocate Robert McChesney about his new book Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy. We'll also discuss the economics of journalism, media reform, and coverage of the revelations by former NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden.  On the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.  Friday at 10am & 5pm.

  

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll have a conversation with longtime media reform advocate Robert McChesney about his new book Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy. We'll also discuss the economics of journalism, media reform, and coverage of the revelations by former NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden. Where did you see the best reporting this week? Tune in on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest:

Courtesy of Tim Redmond


With so many media options to choose from, some older forms are getting less attention. So how are these changes reshaping what news we read, see, and hear? In our 'State of the Media' series KALW’s Ben Trefny is exploring this idea with Bay Area media makers. Today, he spoke with Tim Redmond, who recently left the San Francisco Bay Guardian after more than three decades with the paper.

 

The birth of the negative campaign ad

Oct 23, 2012

Most people would agree that Citizens United was a turning point for campaign finance in the United States, paving the way for Super Political Action Committees to inject record amounts of anonymous donations into this year’s election.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about why women submit fewer op-eds than men and how it affects public discourse. Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project, laments that we’re hearing from only a small fraction of the world’s best minds. What keeps women from writing op-eds and taking part in our public discourse? Join us at 10am PST or leave a comment here. Who are the female opinion writers you value --  and what do they offer? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project

Making "Reel" Change with Independent Film

Mar 13, 2012
San Francisco International Film Festival
courtesy of San Francisco International Film Festival

San Francisco has more film festivals than any other city in the country besides New York. In fact, the oldest film festival still running anywhere in the Americas is the San Francisco International Film festival - started in 1957. But San Francisco is also know as a progressive, activist city. Is there a connection between San Francisco’s activism and its love for independent cinema? What makes film such a powerful tool? And when art combines with public policy, do filmmakers have a responsibility more in line with journalists than artists?

Guests:

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the makers of the film, MissRepresentation, a documentary about the increasingly sexualized portrayals of women and girls in popular culture and news media and the continued absence of women in critical leadership roles.   How are these trends affecting our society--especially youth?  How do they impact you or those around you?  And how can we shift them?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests

Photo by Katie Styer

Michael Stoll is the executive director of the San Francisco Public Press – a non-profit, non-commercial journalistic outlet that started in 2009. Stoll reported for years in the mainstream media, including the Christian Science Monitor and the New York Times. But he questioned the values of ad-driven papers. He wants in-depth, public service journalism to be available without any commercial influence. The San Francisco Public Press carries no advertising – it’s actually modeled after public radio – and Stoll is about to publish his sixth print edition.

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of the payroll tax extension, and the renewal of unemployment benefits, which both expire at the end of the month. We’ll also discuss coverage of the eurozone crisis. We’ll be joined by The Huffington Post’s Arthur Delany, ProPublica's Dafna Linzer, and the Globe and Mail’s Eric Reguly joins us from Rome. Join us  at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Where did you see the best reporting this week?