medicaid

FABRIZIO BENSCH / REUTERS

  On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss Germany’s election results. For the first time in Germany's postwar history, a far-right party managed to enter Parliament. The anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party won 12.6% of the vote.

By lucious lyon, used under CC license/ resized and cropped

Since 1991, teen pregnancies have declined by 67% in the United States. However, rates remain higher in the US than in other industrialized nations, and teen pregnancies have significant social and economic repercussions.

This week, Senate Republicans postponed the vote for their healthcare bill, which was secretly written by 13 men. The bill slashes Medicaid funding while cutting taxes by nearly $1 trillion over the next decade, mostly for the rich and corporations.  

European Commission DG ECHO

On the July 31st edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the 50th anniversary of Medicaid and Medicare. How are the media covering the legacy of these two popular government programs? We’ll also discuss the new US-Turkey Alliance to fight the so-called Islamic State. Why is Turkey attacking the Kurds? We’ll be joined by the Columbia Journalism Review’s Trudy Liebermann, Kaiser Health News’ Mary Agnes Carey, and McCaltchy’s Roy Gutman. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Medi-Cal Changes and Covered California
Guests:  Peter Stern, Certified Specialist in Estate Planning; Elizabeth Landsberg, Director of Legislative Advocacy, the Western Center on Law & Poverty; and Amber Cutler, Staff Attorney, the National Senior Citizens Law Center.
Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.
 

What do you want to know about Medi-cal?

Dec 9, 2013

On the next Your Call, we're continuing our conversation about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act and what it means for you. This time we’re focusing on Medical. As California’s program prepares for a major expansion, doctors say they can’t accept new patients because it doesn’t pay enough. So how will state serve the additional two million people expected to join the program? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.