Meet Your Neighbors

4:38pm

Mon April 23, 2012
Arts & Culture

Temescal in a time of change

In many ways, the Bay Area is still struggling to recover from the housing market crisis. Although some housing prices are rising, only a few neighborhoods have returned to the peaks reached in 2006. And most of them are in Silicon Valley. Richard K. Green, director of the Lusk Center for Real Estate at the University of Southern California, told the San Jose Mercury News that, “Oakland is still dead.”

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12:20pm

Mon April 9, 2012
Arts & Culture

Bowling alley acts like community center in Daly City

Classic Bowling Center, Daly City
photo by Jen Chien

The neighborhood of Westborough straddles the border between Daly City and South San Francisco. It’s a mostly residential area, with quiet sloping streets full of brown and beige town homes built in the 50s and 60s. Before that time, this area was undeveloped farmland and open space. A frenzy of construction after World War II created the neatly planned housing tracts and shopping centers that make up the bulk of Daly City today.

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11:45am

Wed February 15, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

The neighborhood that doubles as an industrial center

West Oakland is surrounded by three freeways, the port, and industries.
Photo courtesy of: Ca gov

West Oakland is a neighborhood in transition – more people are moving in, and developers have it in their sights as the next up-and-coming place to live. But the neighborhood’s air quality is some of the Bay Area’s worst. A recent report by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Transportation Studies found that new laws for trucks had dramatically reduced emissions – but there’s still a long way to go.

Margaret Gibson has lived on 10th street in West Oakland for all of her 52 years.

“It's a little tough some times, but it's home, and I love it.”

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12:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

Rebuilding community, one family at a time in Bayview Hunters Point

Devon Burroughs and Eason Ramson of CARE
Jen Chien

San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood has higher rates of poverty, unemployment, and violence than any other part of the city. But its relative geographical isolation – it’s cut off by the 101 and 280 freeways – can make those issues all but invisible to residents of other neighborhoods.

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