mental health

Holly J. McDede

 

This story originally aired in December of 2015.

Earlier this month, demonstrators around the Bay Area gathered to protest against the police killings of two African American men: Alton Sterling in Louisiana and Philando Castile in Minnesota. 

Dr. Toni Heineman founded A Home Within--the only national organization dedicated solely to meeting the emotional needs of foster youth.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 21, 2016

Apr 21, 2016
by Flickr user WyoFile WyoFile, used under CC BY 2.0 // Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news: 

Sharp concerns over crowded ballot // Capitol Weekly

"California’s clogged, high-stakes November ballot is riveting voters’ attention – and raising fears among those who have to count the votes.

Nancy Lublin, Founder of Crisis Text Line 

Audrey Dilling

Seventy thousand people call San Francisco’s suicide crisis line each year. If someone's making that call, it usually means they're on the verge of harming themselves, and in severe emotional distress. But San Francisco has a service that’s aimed at reaching people before they’re on the brink of crisis — the San Francisco Mental Health Peer-Run Warm Line.

The longer I've been a career counselor, the more I've come to realize that successfully guiding people regarding their career often requires a consideration of their mental health issues.

HOLLY J. MCDEDE

 

Street protests and town hall meetings swiftly followed the shooting death  by police last week of 26-year-old Mario Woods in San Francisco’s Bayview district.

A doctor for your video game addiction

Dec 2, 2015
CC License Flickr User RebeccaPollard. Cropped.

There’s debate among mental health practitioners about whether to consider compulsive video gaming a "disorder" that requires psychiatric help. But one thing they do agree on is that too much gaming can be detrimental to the wellbeing of young people.

Wally Gobetz

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Report: Mission District to lose 8,000 Latino residents in next decade // SF Examiner

"San Francisco’s Mission District will see a massive drop in the number of Latino residents while higher income earners will increase during the next decade, according to a budget analyst report released Tuesday.

Achieving Mental Health Parity

Sep 23, 2015
Photo by Heidi de Marco/KHN

After the state of California fined her employer $4 million in 2013 for violating the legal rights of mental health patients, Oakland psychologist Melinda Ginne expected her job — and her patients’ lives — to get better.

Instead, she said, things got worse.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

This is part three of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Hands are clapping, children are bobbing their heads and most of the elders are wearing their finest hats and polished shoes at the New Revelation Community Church. Reverend Donna Allen leads a sermon.

“And this notion of law enforcement interacting with people with lethal force? Jesus would cry out, ‘I am the Prince of Peace and I tell you, no justice, no peace, no justice!’”

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

  

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

 

This is part one of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Violinist Danielle Taylor is tall, in her late 20s, with a shaved head and a beanie cap propped to the side. She smiles a lot and upon meeting her for the first time, my instinct is to give her a hug instead of a handshake. When she picks up her violin for an impromptu song, she shifts into a deep calm.

Flickr user masha_k_sh

This past summer thousands of women and young people flooded over the border -- seeking to escape terrible violence in South and Central America. Many who came brought little with them, but they carry emotional baggage. And that’s where mental health counselors step in -- to help the recently arrived deal with the trauma they’ve faced, and even to help convince American courts to let them stay. But there are a lot of barriers to good mental health care for immigrants.


On today’s Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the underlying factors of suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, every year, more than 38,000 Americans take their own lives. Suicide rates among middle-aged Americans have risen sharply in the past decade. What explains this? What are the warning signs and what can be done to prevent suicide? Join the conversation and call in with your questions on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Courtney Brown, hotline coordinator for the San Francisco Suicide Prevention Hotline

The Changing Face of What is Normal from Angela Penny

What is the definition of normal? Over 25 percent of the US population over age 18 suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder.

Michael Coghlan / Flickr

Dr. O’Neil Dillon served as the lead psychiatrist at Solano and San Quentin state prisons from 1994 to 2000. Before working in the California state prison system, Dr. Dillon practiced general psychiatry in Berkeley at Herrick Memorial Hospital and Alta Bates Hospital. He also serves as President of the Northern California Psychiatric Society.

Controversy and the DSM V

Sep 4, 2013
ABPathfinder.com

Producer: Lisa Denenmark

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has long been a Bible for mental health treatment.

Some clinicians say call the latest edition of the DSM a deeply flawed manual, but with a necessary common language for researchers and mental health professionals.

Some are outright rejecting it, saying that the new edition -- the DSM V -- is just a tool for the psychiatric drug industry to create more patients and prescribe more drugs.

Is it time for the DSM to go?  

 

If someone you loved was suffering from a serious mental illness, or seemed like they were on the verge of a psychotic breakdown, you might think you could turn to a psychiatric hospital for help. But in California, that might not do you much good. Institutions have the right to turn a person away unless they’ve been taken into custody. More than ninety percent of patients in California psych hospitals have dealt with police first.

Last year, KALW began a series on Asian American mental health. We introduced you to the Lieu family, who described their challenges as immigrants finding care for their schizophrenic daughter.

www.cironline.org

Aaron Glantz is a reporter with the Center for Investigative Reporting and author of the book, The War Comes Home. He talked with KALW about what makes the transition to civilian life so hard.

San Francisco General is the city’s main public hospital, and also the main provider for the city’s poorest and most vulnerable residents. On an average day, about 20 people suffering from mental illness walk through its doors asking for psychiatric help. It’s often a last resort for people without a support system or anywhere else to turn. But ongoing state and city budget cuts have forced San Francisco General, like many other public hospitals in the state, to make tough decisions. The psychiatric emergency rooms have been hit the hardest.

Credit Under CC license from Alaina Abplnalp Photography. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lainamarie/6833534625/

This article has been formatted for the web. Listen to the audio above to hear the full Q&A and story.

It’s difficult to deal with any kind of illness when it hits. But when it affects your emotional and psychological health, it’s often impossible to even describe.

SARA CURTIS

It’s a rare sensitivity to normal, everyday sounds, like typing, or footsteps, or even breathing. And it’s being increasingly diagnosed. Researchers believe Misophonia begins in adolescence, but it can carry into adulthood. It can cause the people who believe they’re suffering from it to feel enraged, panicked, and inescapably overwhelmed.

KALW’s Leila Day spoke with a teenager who believes she’s suffering from Misophonia in this story of a family’s struggle with sound.  A note for our readers: we’re only using the girls’ first name to protect her identity.