Michael Brown

How does citizen oversight of police departments work?  On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing different models in Northern California. Where is citizen oversight working? San Diego, Oakland, Riverside, Long Beach, Sausalito, Novato, and Berkeley have review boards, but few people know these boards even exist. What power do citizen oversight boards have to ensure police accountability? How should these boards work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

East Bay Express

The current unrest after police shootings of unarmed black men means the battle for racial justice is far from over. Jeff Chang is a journalist, cultural critic, and the head of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford. In his new book, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, he argues that the myth of multiculturalism has in some ways silenced a real conversation about racial disparity in America. KALW’s Sandhya Dirks sat down with Chang to talk about his new book, current protests over police shootings, and how to begin a conversation about race in America today.

Desmond Cole

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

Audio Pending...

On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

Brett Myers / Youth Radio

The August shooting of Michael Brown touched off protests and sparked a national discussion about race and justice. The 18-year-old African-American man was unarmed when he was shot multiple times by a Ferguson, Missouri police officer. Youth Radio reporter Myles Bess lives in Oakland, California, and five years ago he lived through the police shooting of another unarmed black teen, Oscar Grant. Bess traveled to Ferguson for the protests and the funeral of Michael Brown, and he sent us this audio postcard reflecting on what happens next as things quiet down in that town.

Your Call: How should we talk about racism?

Aug 25, 2014

On the August 26th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust, Dr. Shakti Butler about her documentary, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity. The documentary explores racism, as a dynamic system with multiple layers functioning simultaneously. So what are different forms of racism and racial inequality and how should it be confronted?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Shakti Butler, filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the militarization of police forces across the country. According to a recent ACLU report, last year, the Department of Homeland Security pumped $1 billion into local law enforcement, while the Department of Defense supplied another $449 million worth of equipment for police forces.  Why are police so heavily armed? And how is this playing out in places like Ferguson, Missouri?  Join the conversation on Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests: