music

Courtesy of the Dane family / Cropped and resized

It’s not surprising to find female singers today who “do it all.”  They write and sing their own music, play an instrument, and maybe even dance. And in a growing number of cases they also run businesses. But this wasn’t the norm back in 1957, when singer Barbara Dane released her first album.

For young Bay Area mariachis, music is a family affair

Aug 17, 2016

 

Picture a mariachi band.

Taher Shah
tahershah.com

India and Pakistan have much in common but, rarely agree on anything – cricket, Kashmir or mangos.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Philosophy Talk: The Mystery of Music

Jul 23, 2016
"Music" by crayon27 used under CC license

What does it mean to have good (or bad) taste in music?

Lavay Smith and Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers have been one of San Francisco’s favorite bands since they started performing together in 1989. Their signature retro sound was right at home in the swing revival of the '90s, but they’ve made it through from “trendy” to “classic.”

 

Sandip Roy: Purple Angel

Apr 20, 2016
Taher Shah
tahershah.com

  India and Pakistan have much in common but, rarely agree on anything – cricket, Kashmir or mangos. 

Jazzman Noel Jewkes

Feb 23, 2016
Photo by Kat Wade / resized and cropped

 

 

Living in the Bay Area requires some serious resourcefulness and there is a group of people who are pretty used to that: jazz musicians.

 

Coldplay's new video is the great Western discovery of India all over again. 

Interview: Musician Martha Rodriguez Salazar

Feb 2, 2016
COURTESY OF COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER

At the Community Music Center in San Francisco, Mexican-born, musician and teacher Martha Rodriguez-Salazar helps students make music for the joy of it. 

A dark side of the Pan-Pacific Fair

Jan 19, 2016
Courtesy of Society of California Pioneers / Cropped and Resized

The official celebration of the centennial of the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition in San Francisco has ended, but a number of events associated with the Pan-Pacific Expo continue into the spring.

Due to technical delays around KALW's move to temporary quarters, no panelists or calls tonight.  Moderator Dana Rodriguez instead shared some of his favorite recordings. 

How can abstract philosophical arguments about love be represented in a five-movement violin concerto?


Philosophy Talk asks about Dance as a way of knowing

Oct 2, 2015

Is dance a form of perception? Is perception a form of dance?


Tom DeCaigny shares a song that gets him up and dancing. 

Afropop Worldwide's "San Francisco: Afropop By the Bay" tells the unlikely story of how a group of superb African musicians-from Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa-landed in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1970s and early '80s.

My Mixtape: "Rags to Riches" by Fat Chops

Aug 30, 2015

Fifteen-year-old Ari Liccardo's artist name is Fat Chops. The song "Rags to Riches" is one of the first songs he ever produced as a musician, and it addresses some of the struggles he's been through in his life.

RYSE Youth Center: A haven for Richmond teens

Aug 27, 2015
A. Mendelson

The city of Richmond has long had a reputation for violence. But things are starting to change. Recently, the city announced its lowest rate of homicide in 33 years. Even so, Richmond continues to be one of the most dangerous cities in the country. For young people seeking refuge from the violence, there’s the RYSE Youth Center. The organization provides a safe space for students to develop their musical talent and express themselves creatively. From the series Generation Change, reporter Anne Hoffman has more. 

The Tenderloin’s sanctuary of song

Aug 20, 2015
Courtesy of the Cadillac Hotel

 

Rebecca Roudman and Jason Eckl, members of the band Dirty Cello, are doing a sound check in the middle of the day, in an unconventional location: the lobby of the Cadillac Hotel in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district.

Derek Bridges

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Your Call: Making music under occupation

Jun 19, 2015

On the June 19th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundable. This week, we’ll have a conversation with veteran journalist Sandy Tolan about his new book, "Children of the Stone: The Power of Music in a Hard Land.”

Michael Zelner

It’s Thursday, and do you know what you’re doing this weekend? If you don’t, fear not: I’ve got a list of go-to events that are open to everyone.

Colin Peden

 

I’m inside what looks like it could be a college library or a research institute. People sit quietly working at desks and tables, surrounded by shelves full of periodicals and rows of storage boxes that are neatly indexed by color and symbol. Lydia Athanasopoulou shows me around. She’s the senior content coordinator here -- kind of like the head librarian.

San Francisco rapper DaVinci says it was hard to ignore the gentrification in his neighborhood when he was growing up. He’s from the Fillmore District, which has been in phases of decline, redevelopment, and change since the 1960’s. In the past decade, the Fillmore has undergone a surge of economic activity that’s changed the face of the famous jazz quarter of the city once again. In this installment of Bay Area Beats, DaVinci shares how growing up in the Fillmore influenced his music.

Courtesy of Dan Harper

Sacred Harp singing is considered to be one of the oldest forms of American folk music. It dates back to the 1700s, to a choral style that developed in the churches of colonial New England, but eventually took root in the South. It’s a participatory tradition, which means that singers perform for themselves, not for an audience. Today, Sacred Harp is experiencing something of a renaissance, some even characterize it as the punk rock of choral music.

Dutch Treat Imaging Atelier

For the person accustomed to playing a factory model, a guitar from the hand of a skilled luthier is always a revelation. The tone, action, craftsmanship, and finish make playing such an instrument a unique pleasure.

Irving Sloane – Classic Guitar Construction

It used to be that if you wanted to learn how to make a guitar, you had to apprentice with a luthier. You’d find them in Europe, and you had almost no other option. That is, until New Yorker Irving Sloane wrote the book on high-end construction: Classic Guitar Construction: Diagrams, Photographs, and Step-By-Step Instructions.

Note: This piece loses much of its music in written form. Click the audio player above to get the full effect. 

Roland Feller is responsible for the well-being of many of the city's stringed instruments. When you imagine him working on a violin, picture him seated at a tiny old fashioned desk littered with tools and wood shavings, in a room piled with sheet music, billing forms...and violins. Violins hanging on the walls and from the ceiling; violins leaning against the table legs on the floor.

April Renae / brigetboyle.com

You can hear all sorts of different musical ingredients in the work of Briget Boyle. In the mix is everything from Eastern European harmonies to Balkan brass bands to pop rock. You can hear all those influences, plus a little country western twang, on Boyle’s new solo album, ‘The Parts Interior.’

BRIGET BOYLE: Every person in some way can be a singer, and can tell their story, even if it's just singing along with the radio or singing in the shower. There's something really human about it, and really simple.  

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


 

“You know, you can only paint a painting once. But a song, you can replay, re-envision, re-imagine virtually an infinite number of times,” says Matt Jaffe. And that’s one reason he wants to devote himself to music.

This Mill Valley singer-songwriter has opened for the legendary Mavis Staples and will do the same March 7th for Megan Slankard. One thing he couldn’t do, if he wasn’t on stage, is legally attend many of his own shows; Matt Jaffe is only 19.

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