music

Your Call: Making music under occupation

Jun 19, 2015

On the June 19th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundable. This week, we’ll have a conversation with veteran journalist Sandy Tolan about his new book, "Children of the Stone: The Power of Music in a Hard Land.”

Michael Zelner

It’s Thursday, and do you know what you’re doing this weekend? If you don’t, fear not: I’ve got a list of go-to events that are open to everyone.

Colin Peden

 

I’m inside what looks like it could be a college library or a research institute. People sit quietly working at desks and tables, surrounded by shelves full of periodicals and rows of storage boxes that are neatly indexed by color and symbol. Lydia Athanasopoulou shows me around. She’s the senior content coordinator here -- kind of like the head librarian.

San Francisco rapper DaVinci says it was hard to ignore the gentrification in his neighborhood when he was growing up. He’s from the Fillmore District, which has been in phases of decline, redevelopment, and change since the 1960’s. In the past decade, the Fillmore has undergone a surge of economic activity that’s changed the face of the famous jazz quarter of the city once again. In this installment of Bay Area Beats, DaVinci shares how growing up in the Fillmore influenced his music.

Courtesy of Dan Harper

Sacred Harp singing is considered to be one of the oldest forms of American folk music. It dates back to the 1700s, to a choral style that developed in the churches of colonial New England, but eventually took root in the South. It’s a participatory tradition, which means that singers perform for themselves, not for an audience. Today, Sacred Harp is experiencing something of a renaissance, some even characterize it as the punk rock of choral music.

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