music

Luscious Queer Music Festival Aug. 22-24

Aug 7, 2014

Vicki Randle of Skip the Needle and Matt Alber (above) are just two of some two dozen performers featured at the Luscious Queer Music Festival, first of its kind in Northern California.  Headliners for the three-day festival at Saratoga Springs Retreat Center in Lake County Aug 22-24 include LGBT artists Mary Lambert, Mx Justin Vivian Bond, Jon Ginoli of Pansy Division, comic Marga Gomez and women's music pioneer Cris Williamson.  Hear some of their music and details for the weekend celebration on tonight's Out in the Bay.  Eric Jansen hosts, with guests Jon Ginoli, DJs Page Hodel and Justime, and event producer and performance artist Ruven Hannah. (Broadcast 7pm Thursday Aug. 7; click "play" to hear it after broadcast.)

Fog City Blues + Blues Power Hour this Wednesday

Jul 21, 2014

This week Fog City Blues revisits an interview with Bay Area blues harp legend Rick Estrin, who performs this weekend in Redwood City and Seaside. Rick talks to host Devon Strolovitch about his early days in the Bay Area blues scene and plays tunes from some of the greats he met as an up-and-comer. We'll also hear tracks from the brand new album by Rick Estrin & The Nightcats, You Asked For It...

Eighteen-year-old Tatyana Martinez turned to writing poetry as a young girl to cope with big changes in her life. Over time, her poetry evolved into music. She now works for the youth run recording studio Upstar Records, inside San Francisco’s Sunset Youth Services. The youth center supports young people and their families with things like parenting classes, food assistance, and job training at Upstar. When she’s not helping young musicians make music, Martinez writes and records her own songs with the goal of putting out her own album. She shares the story behind her songs in this installment of Bay Area Beats.

Blues legend Sugar Pie DeSanto still hits the high notes

Jul 10, 2014

She began winning talent shows up and down Fillmore Street at 18, when she weighed just 85 pounds, wore size 3 shoes and went by her given name, Umpeylia Marsema Balinton. 

Photo courtesy StoryCorps

 

Patricia Chin was born in San Francisco’s Chinatown.  She had never left the neighborhood when she auditioned to be a chorus girl. It was quite a leap for a young Asian-American girl, born in 1935, but Chin loved the adventure, and saw it as a way to bring home extra money. Her group, the Chinese Vanities, performed in nightclubs up and down the West Coast.

Julie Blaumstein

As the city of San Francisco experiences new waves of growth and expansion, we travel back to another time before redevelopment reshaped the Fillmore District. 

In the 40’s and 50’s the Fillmore was a vibrant mix of cultures, and a national hotspot for jazz musicians. On any given night you could hear the voice of Billie Holiday, or the playing of Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Dizzy Gillespie. The lively and diverse neighborhood quickly earned a nickname: The Harlem of the West.   

Courtesy of The Golden Gate Park Band

Few civic institutions in San Francisco pre-date the 1906 earthquake. One is the cable car, invented here in 1873. Another one is The Golden Gate Park Band. It dates from 1882, when it was a support unit of the California National Guard. Now it’s a Sunday afternoon mainstay at The Spreckles Temple of Music in Golden Gate Park.

SF Mixtape Society keeps the art of sharing mixes alive

May 14, 2014
Annie Lin / San Francisco Mixtape Society

 

The San Francisco Mixtape Society hosts mix exchanges at the Make Out Room in the Mission District. Music lovers meet, mingle and exchange mixes they made based on a particular theme.

Bay Area Beats: Micah Tron

May 12, 2014

Micah Tron is a rapper born and raised in San Francisco. She’s a queer woman of color, but the hurdles she has faced go even beyond her race, sexual preference, and gender. She lived in a shelter after being displaced by Hurricane Katrina and a few years into her twenties, she was diagnosed with epilepsy. But she hasn’t let this stop her from pursuing her music career – she says it actually motivates her. After her nephew was born deaf, she learned sign language, and her latest dream is to make music for the deaf community. She spoke with reporter Lo Benichou about her story.

Julie Caine

It’s a chilly morning in San Francisco, and a funeral is starting.

Jeanne Finley

Music has a special power that we all recognize. It can make us dance or sing along. It can make us happy, sad, reflective, agitated or calm. We can hear it live, or recorded. But seldom do we have a small choir serenade us - only us - at our bedsides.

That’s what The Threshold Choir does-- but not everyone can request these services. They only sing to a specific group of people: the infirm or dying.

Sunset Youth Services is an organization that supports transitional age youth and their families with things like parenting classes, food assistance, and job training. And it's home to the youth-run recording studio, Upstar Records, where young people learn audio production skills. That's where you’ll usually find 16-year-old Adriel Diaz. 

Bay Area Beats: Meet San Francisco's Mystic Blaze

Apr 30, 2014

TraVaughn Hicks has been making music since he was a young boy and his rapper uncle would record him singing on his songs.

Starting on May 6th, we’re throwing a Public Radio Party at KALW.  And we’re big believers in never—ever!—having radio silence at a party.  

So, we asked some of KALW’s music junkies to dip into their collections and pull out their favorite songs for our Public Radio Party Mixtape

You've probably been seeing this next band around town for a while, on line-ups at clubs like Bottom of the Hill and The Independent. They've been playing the show circuit for over four years and have a following that stretches as far as London, England. 

  The late Abdelhalim Hafez is an icon of mid-20th century Arabic music. Like Elvis in the United States, Hafez has accrued a massive following of fans in Egypt and abroad, with fans affectionately referring to him under the one word moniker “Halim.” 

Image from zawaya.org

The Arabic music ensemble Aswat is based in the Bay Area and plays classical Arab standards in concerts throughout the Bay Area. But you don't have to know the language to participate.

Elias Perez

Click the "play" button above to listen to the entire show.

40 years ago, in small town bars across the U.K., you could find party goers spinning, twirling and pumping their legs to the fast sounds of American soul music. But, it wasn’t the top 40 Motown sound you’d usually hear, in fact, by that time in the 1970’s, Funk and Disco had already taken over the charts. These kids craved Soul they hadn’t heard yet--rare B sides, and small label releases that were overlooked in the surplus of American-produced Soul music in the 1960’s. DJs in the U.K. began collecting Soul records that were off the beaten track, and often impossible to find again. That specific sound of Soul, and the night-life culture that erupted around it, was branded "Northern Soul."

  

Lily Chou

It's been 40 years since the first all-night R&B party at the Wigan Casino nightclub outside Manchester, England. The doors didn't open until 2 a.m., and its 1,200-capacity ballroom was packed until dawn with dance-crazy (possibly amphetamine-fueled) soul fans. They called the uptempo vibe Northern Soul, after the region of England that fell in love with rare '60s R&B.

The Magnetic Manna Dey

Nov 20, 2013
www.pinkvilla.com

Immigrants often feel much lonelier mourning the far away death of someone who was dearly beloved – a writer, an actor, a sportsman. But a singer is different. In the days before the Internet,  singers were the only parts of our growing up that we could carry with us into small towns across America. They were portable. They came on cassettes, the plastic covers cracked by the weight of our journeys. 

Sandip Roy discovers the long lost sounds of Indian Music!


Young rockers tap their creativity at Rock Band Land

Sep 5, 2013

Welcome to Rock Band Land. It’s a place where 4 to 9 year olds are introduced to music by learning to write it themselves. They go through the whole process, up to when they are on stage in front of 300 screaming fans.

Alyssa Kapnik

Twice a year the San Francisco Symphony hosts workshops called “Sing Out Davies”, as part of the symphony's Community of Music Makers program. For one evening, singers from around the Bay Area come together to make music as one.  KALW's Alyssa Kapnik stood among them for a recent workshop and brought back their impressions of what it's like to be an ordinary person in such an extraordinary experience.  

Flickr Creative Commons/Nerfski

Art movements come and go, but one particular dance style seems to be here to stay. "Bboying," or "breakdancing" (as most people would call it), began in the Bronx in the late '60s and has since expanded internationally. As it’s grown, it’s changed – and that change has led to some major cultural conflicts between the younger dancers and the older ones. 

Purple bag nostalgia

Aug 7, 2013
Sandip Roy

Nostalgia today is no longer reserved for the disappearance of things we feel had been around forever. Or perhaps it’s our notion of forever that has shrunk - from 163 years for the telegramto 13 to 5. The MusicWorld store  was not even a decade old.

 

http://www.oakarts.org/

In 2002, Oakland Mayor, now governor, Jerry Brown started Oakland School for the Arts (OSA) with the hope that students would have an outlet to express themselves through art forms like dance, theater, and visual illustrations.

Hana Baba

Learning music and playing it is one thing, but teaching it is whole other can of worms, especially when you’re teaching kids – and especially when there are 850 of them.

That’s what Ivan DeSouza does every week. He’s been the music teacher at Delaine Eastin Elementary School in Union City since its birth 12 years ago. It's part of New Haven Unified School District that recently won $29 million  in the President's Race to the Top program.

It’s not often we hear a story of love and heartbreak – and the music that was specifically composed for it. One such story befell the 19th century composer Johannes Brahms and Clara Schumann. Meghan Laslocky is author of The Little Book of Heartbreak and she shares their story of love and the music that told it with KALW’s Hana Baba.

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