NAFTA

11:28pm

Mon January 13, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Today on Your Call: What is the legacy of NAFTA?

4:59pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

Feeling the effects of NAFTA in California

Professor Harley Shaiken testified at House Committee on Education in 2011
House Committee on Education

It’s been almost two decades since Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. signed the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. When then-president Bill Clinton signed it, he told Congress that the agreement was the only correct response to the world’s rapidly changing economy. As a border state and a major agricultural producer, California has a big stake in NAFTA. 

U.C. Berkeley geography professor Harley Shaiken has written extensively on the agreement, and he spoke with KALW's Holly Kernan about what NAFTA has meant for this state.

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4:57pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Health, Science, Environment

NAFTA's environmental impact on Tijuana 20 years later

The government confined, sealed off and buried the contamination deep underground, then put basketball courts on top because more intense construction on the site would risk digging up toxic materials.
Adrian Florido

When the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed 20 years ago, one of the big concerns was how the treaty would impact the environment.

After NAFTA was signed, eastern Tijuana experienced a building frenzy. One industrial park after another sprung up to accommodate the hundreds of American factories that came here in search of cheap labor.

Magdalena Cerda is an environmental activist, and she’s brought me to the edge of one of those sprawling complexes, to some barren, empty concrete basketball courts.

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4:46pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

Food fight in Florida over the Tomato Wars

Carlos Fisher, co-owner of Sierra Seed Company, inside one of his greenhouses in Imuris, Sonora, Mexico.
Michel Marizco

Florida and Mexico growers are feuding over tomato prices. It’s the same argument heard nearly 20 years ago when NAFTA was first signed, when American farmers feared cheaper Mexican crops would flood the market here and put them out of business.

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12:00am

Tue September 11, 2012