Native American

Refinery healing walks connect communities

Jul 16, 2015
Lezak Shallat

This summer, many East Bay residents are drawing attention to the dangers of living next door to the oil industry. Borrowing from a Native American tradition of healing walks, they are walking to all five refineries along the northeastern shores of the San Francisco Bay.

Standing on the bridge over the Carquinez Straits connecting the San Pablo and Suisun Bays, two Native American women -- Penny Opal Plant and Alison Ehara-Brown -- sing a song of healing.

Native American sweats out trauma of the past

Sep 9, 2014
Tom Levy

It’s intense in a sweat lodge. You enter a round structure, about five feet high at the center, and sit down on the earthen floor. Then the flap of heavy blankets closes and you’re left in utter darkness. Moments later, the leader pours water over hot, volcanic rocks. Like a sauna, thick steam rises and spreads.

Under CC license from Flickr user Mr.TinDC

Caroyln Brandy started playing the conga drum in the late 1960s.

“It was something that women didn’t really do back in those days,” Brandy says. “You didn’t grow up and think, ‘I’m gonna be a conga drummer.’ I started just being really mesmerized by the conga.”

  On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about how people come to terms with past atrocities. The Catholic Diocese in Monterey recently held a reconciliation Mass for a band of Ohlone Indians to publicly acknowledge and apologize for the church’s abuse of native people during the Mission era.  What is the power of a public apology?  Is it enough?  Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What does reconciliation mean to you? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

Guests:

Valentin Lopez, Tribal Chairman of the Amah Mutsun band of Ohlone

On today's Your Call, we’ll speak with David Treuer, author of Rez Life, an examination of Native American reservation life, past and present.  A United Nations special rapporteur recently recommended the restoration of some tribal lands in the US, including the Black Hills in South Dakota.  Does the United States owe reparations to native people? If you've lived on a reservation, what's your experience?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and You.

Guests:

David Treuer, author of Rez Life

Caleen Sisk, chief of the Winnemem Wintu tribe

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the public debut of a man called Ishi. Ishi was Native American, aYana from the Deer Creek area, about 150 miles northeast of Berkeley. And for the past century he’s been known as “the last wild Indian in North America.”

http://www.flickr.com/photos/swedish_heritage_board/5228289913/sizes/m/in/photostream/

UC Berkeley is home to the country’s second largest collection of human skeletons outside of a graveyard, about 12 thousand total. Some are thousands of years old. The University has unearthed and studied these remains for centuries. They’ve taught researchers a great deal about California’s prehistoric past.