Native Americans

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Brown removes March 1 medical deadline… Conflicting medical views on legalization, and commercial grows… cannabis Christians… Tommy Chong... and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

The U.N. of Native American Fellowship

Sep 15, 2015
Intertribal Friendship House

The words “Native American Reservation” might conjure an image of an expansive Southwestern landscape, or maybe a Casino. But for the 45,000 Native Americans in the Bay Area, the reservation looks a little different: It’s a squat brick building on a busy intersection in Oakland.

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, Semptember 3, 2015

Sep 3, 2015
Tony Avelar / The Christian Science Monitor / Getty Images

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

California's Katrina is coming // Wired

 

"California's always been for dreamers. Dreams of gold brought the forty-niners. Easy seasons and expansive arable acreage brought farmers, dreaming of an agricultural paradise. Fame, natural beauty, and the hang-loose cultural mosaic have brought dreaming millions to the state where summer never seems to end.

transmitdistort

McDonald’s to go to court over drugs?   Lobby Day in D.C.   Sidecar delivers cannabis in SF… Morgan Freeman says “Legalize it”… and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

 

  

On the October 30th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with filmmakers featured in the upcoming American Indian Film Festival. How can culture be a tool of healing for people forced to give up ancestral lands and move onto smaller reservations challenged by poverty? We'll also talk about the uses and mis-uses of Native culture in today's society, including the prevalent use of people as mascots for schools and football teams. What are the consequences of cultural appropriation? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Angela Johnston

The sun is just beginning to rise over the glassy water at San Francisco’s Aquatic Park. Karen Wapato is beaming as she emerges from the Bay and peels off her goggles.

“It was better than yesterday,” she says. “I keep on just telling myself, stay calm don’t panic, keep breathing, try to keep my stroke real smooth, as smooth as I can,” she says as she catches her breath.

Wapato has never swum in the ocean before, and it’s her second day swimming in the San Francisco Bay. 

“I can’t believe I am doing it! I can’t believe I am one of these people that swim in the Bay, I’ve joined this elite group.”

On the July 29th, 2014 edition of  Your Call, we’ll have a conversation Mark Dowie, investigative journalist and author of Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict between Global Conservation and Native Peoples. He writes that about half of world’s protected conservation areas were occupied or used by indigenous peoples, but they were displaced in the interests of conservation, so what is the history of the US national parks and Native Peoples? Join the conversation, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Some of the first people in the Bay Area were Native Americans – members of the Ohlone tribe, who settled around what is now the city of Richmond. Beginning in the 1920s, another group of Native people found their way to the Bay Area. They were migrants from the Acoma and Laguna tribes of the Southwest. When they arrived, they took up an unusual living arrangement: in boxcars, parked on the dead ends of the city’s railroad tracks.