Oakland

Daily news roundup for Monday, June 22, 2015

Jun 22, 2015
Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland Claims Record for Soul Train Line // Inside Bay Area
"OAKLAND -- We already know Oakland's got soul. Now, the city apparently has the distinction of holding the world record for a "Soul Train"-style dance line.

Julie Caine

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Michael Zelner

It’s Thursday, and do you know what you’re doing this weekend? If you don’t, fear not: I’ve got a list of go-to events that are open to everyone.

Liz Mak

Last night, the Golden State Warriors reclaimed the NBA Championship title for the first time in 40 years. Impromptu celebrations broke out in the streets. KALW sent reporters out into Oakland and San Francisco to talk to the local team's die-hard fans. 

photo courtesy Antique Naked Soul

Antique Naked Soul is an Oakland band with a message: Music can change the world, and make you move.

They describe themselves as a “beatbox-sing soul band,” which means they use only the sounds of their own voices, looped on-stage, to create their music, and their message.

transmitdistort

Feinstein evolves on CBD… Harris: War on drugs has failed… Oakland airport workers charged as smugglers… How to roll a joint…  and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 21, 2015

May 21, 2015
Mike Koozmin/The S.F. Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

SF schools are developing computer science curriculum for all grade levels // SF Examiner

Fantastic Negrito live on Fog City Blues tonight

May 20, 2015

Oakland-based Fantastic Negrito sings songs born from a long hard life channeled through black roots music. Slide guitar, drums, piano. Urgent, desperate, edgy. For anyone who ever felt like it was over yet hoped it wasn’t, this is your music; blues harnessed, forged in realness. Fantastic Negrito was the winner earlier this year of NPR's Tiny Desk Concert contest.  He joins host Devon Strolovitch live in the studio this Wednesday 5/20 at 9:00 pm.

 

Living in a multi-cultural city yields all sorts of surprises. On a corner in Oakland just east of Lake Merritt, a small Buddha has helped bring neighbors together.

I didn’t know what to think the first time I saw the makeshift Vietnamese shrine. At the time, a few potted plants and flowers brightened up the corner. A piece of scrap metal protected the statue’s head. I had just moved to the neighborhood.

“Did someone die?” I asked a few women congregating in front of it. They shook their heads. One pointed to the sky and said, “Buddha. Pray.”

Interview with retired Oakland and San Jose police officer Pat Boyd. He's also seen things from another side: His daughter was abducted and murdered.

Young adults with disabilities prepare for the workforce at Fairyland

May 6, 2015

Intellectually and developmentally disabled young adults have few options after they leave high school. In the Bay Area, nearly 60% of these young people are unemployed or don’t make enough to earn a living. In Alameda County, a new program is making an effort to change that.

Daily news roundup for Monday, May 4, 2015

May 4, 2015
The exterior of the new co-working space 1920c at 950 Grant Avenue, which is above a souvenir shop and below residences.
Jason Henry/ SF Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Chinatown clash: Co-working space, other tech uses violate zoning // SF Chronicle

"A new co-working facility in the heart of Chinatown promises 'a collective space that incorporates wellness, sustainability, local community and collaboration.'

99% Invisible: Unbuilt

Apr 24, 2015
Courtesy of The Urbanist.

On the April 24, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

There is an allure to unbuilt structures: the utopian, futuristic transports; the impossibly tall skyscrapers; even the horrible highways. They all capture our imagination with what could have been.

Anna Vignet

Ambessa Cantave and I are taking a walk in West Oakland, looking for an old music venue he used to go to. He’s having some trouble finding the place.

“Let’s go down one more block,” he says. “I think … it’s one of these things.”

The building we stop in front of used to be a dairy creamery, before it got converted to a warehouse music venue called the WC.

“It was pretty abandoned,” Cantave says. “It seemed like a great place for partying.”


It’s 8:08am, the Friday before spring break, and under other circumstances Kathleen Byrnes would already be at work.

“We would be in our classrooms preparing for the day, which is where we would rather be,” she says.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 16, 2015

Apr 16, 2015
Paul Chinn / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Counter-Terrorism Officials Helped Track Black Lives Matter Protesters // East Bay Express 

 

Elizabeth Beltran-Larios struggled with her identity for much of her childhood. Beltran-Larios was born in Oakland, but she was raised in a small town south of Jalisco, Mexico. Growing up, she felt alienated from the Catholic church because of her sexual orientation. Her exposure to Buddhism in college helped her come to terms with who she is and what she believes. She sat down in the StoryCorps booth to share her story of this transformation.

 

 

Surveillance and privacy issues have been in the news a lot in the past few years. Perhaps the biggest news was made by by Edward Snowden, who leaked information about the NSA’s massive collection of American citizens' cell phone data. But the privacy debate has also hit closer to home. You may remember last spring, when the Oakland City Council debated a controversial surveillance hub called the Domain Awareness Center, or DAC.

Gun crime drops in Oakland, according to new data // Contra Costa Times

"If it seemed like fewer nights were interrupted by the sounds of gunfire and sirens last year, that's not your imagination.

"Oakland, which in 2014 had its fewest homicides in 14 years, also saw a big reduction in one of the leading causes of murder: gunfire.

Bay Area hackathon brings tech to youth of color

Mar 23, 2015
Johnathan Henninger

When President Obama launched the My Brother’s Keeper initiative in 2014, he said he hoped it would help boys and young men of color find success. Here in the Bay Area, Qeyno Labs answered the President's call with an event called the My Brother’s Keeper Hackathon. It's an intensive weekend challenge for young people of color to build mobile applications and websites that help their communities. 

The Problem


Living wage fight explodes in East Oakland

Mar 16, 2015

If you want to hire a worker in Oakland, you’re going to have to pay a little bit more these days. At the beginning of the month, Measure FF, overwhelming approved by voters last November, finally became law. It raises Oakland’s minimum wage to $12.25 an hour.

But Oakland is a little bit different from Seattle, San Francisco, and dozens of other cities that passed minimum wage hikes last year. It already has a living wage ordinance on the books that requires employers benefitting from city subsidies to pay $14.10 an hour.

Some small businesses owners have warned that raising the minimum wage could shut them down, but Farley’s East owner Chris Hillyard says he’s willing to make the transition. He sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny.

Chris Hillyard: So youre gonna have to pay a little bit more, but it’s for a better Oakland.

Click the audio player above to listen to the full story.

 

How does citizen oversight of police departments work?  On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing different models in Northern California. Where is citizen oversight working? San Diego, Oakland, Riverside, Long Beach, Sausalito, Novato, and Berkeley have review boards, but few people know these boards even exist. What power do citizen oversight boards have to ensure police accountability? How should these boards work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

 

Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

transmitdistort

More groups favor legalization… Federal court in Washington State still  convicting growers… Art contest… Utah rabbits hopped up on illegal grows… and more.

LEGALIZATION

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Feb 25, 2015
Nicole A. West / Oakland North

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 415, meet 628: New S.F. area code debuts Saturday // SF Gate

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

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