Oakland

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 16, 2015

Apr 16, 2015
Paul Chinn / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Counter-Terrorism Officials Helped Track Black Lives Matter Protesters // East Bay Express 

 

Elizabeth Beltran-Larios struggled with her identity for much of her childhood. Beltran-Larios was born in Oakland, but she was raised in a small town south of Jalisco, Mexico. Growing up, she felt alienated from the Catholic church because of her sexual orientation. Her exposure to Buddhism in college helped her come to terms with who she is and what she believes. She sat down in the StoryCorps booth to share her story of this transformation.

 

 

Surveillance and privacy issues have been in the news a lot in the past few years. Perhaps the biggest news was made by by Edward Snowden, who leaked information about the NSA’s massive collection of American citizens' cell phone data. But the privacy debate has also hit closer to home. You may remember last spring, when the Oakland City Council debated a controversial surveillance hub called the Domain Awareness Center, or DAC.

Gun crime drops in Oakland, according to new data // Contra Costa Times

"If it seemed like fewer nights were interrupted by the sounds of gunfire and sirens last year, that's not your imagination.

"Oakland, which in 2014 had its fewest homicides in 14 years, also saw a big reduction in one of the leading causes of murder: gunfire.

Bay Area hackathon brings tech to youth of color

Mar 23, 2015
Johnathan Henninger

When President Obama launched the My Brother’s Keeper initiative in 2014, he said he hoped it would help boys and young men of color find success. Here in the Bay Area, Qeyno Labs answered the President's call with an event called the My Brother’s Keeper Hackathon. It's an intensive weekend challenge for young people of color to build mobile applications and websites that help their communities. 

The Problem


Living wage fight explodes in East Oakland

Mar 16, 2015

If you want to hire a worker in Oakland, you’re going to have to pay a little bit more these days. At the beginning of the month, Measure FF, overwhelming approved by voters last November, finally became law. It raises Oakland’s minimum wage to $12.25 an hour.

But Oakland is a little bit different from Seattle, San Francisco, and dozens of other cities that passed minimum wage hikes last year. It already has a living wage ordinance on the books that requires employers benefitting from city subsidies to pay $14.10 an hour.

Some small businesses owners have warned that raising the minimum wage could shut them down, but Farley’s East owner Chris Hillyard says he’s willing to make the transition. He sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny.

Chris Hillyard: So youre gonna have to pay a little bit more, but it’s for a better Oakland.

Click the audio player above to listen to the full story.

 

How does citizen oversight of police departments work?  On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing different models in Northern California. Where is citizen oversight working? San Diego, Oakland, Riverside, Long Beach, Sausalito, Novato, and Berkeley have review boards, but few people know these boards even exist. What power do citizen oversight boards have to ensure police accountability? How should these boards work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

 

Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

transmitdistort

More groups favor legalization… Federal court in Washington State still  convicting growers… Art contest… Utah rabbits hopped up on illegal grows… and more.

LEGALIZATION

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Feb 25, 2015
Nicole A. West / Oakland North

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 415, meet 628: New S.F. area code debuts Saturday // SF Gate

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

Paul Brekke-Miesner

The Bay Area was well represented in Super Bowl XLIX. The MVP, Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady, is from San Mateo. His favorite target, Julian Edelmen, is from Redwood City. And the man who could have won the game for the Seahawks, running back Marshawn Lynch, went to high school at Oakland Tech. In fact, Oakland has an especially rich history of athletes making it to the pros.

Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Legislators Draft Bills to Curb Use of Psych Meds on Foster Kids // KQED

"Almost one in four teenagers living in foster care in California is prescribed some type of psychotropic medication, found an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News. And of those teens, 60 percent are being prescribed anti-psychotics.

Ol' Silver Tongue live on Fog City Blues tonight

Feb 4, 2015

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

Jeremy Dalmas

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Nellie Large

Seafarers, from fisherman to explorers, have been coming to Bay Area ports for centuries. Maritime historian Lincoln Paine says our relationship with the ocean has been instrumental in shaping not only the history of the Bay Area, but of the entire world. His latest book, Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World, charts 3,500 years of maritime commerce and discovery. KALW's Hana Baba spoke with him about the importance of the sea and its formative role in creating the bustling cities surrounding the Bay.

 

Libby Schaaf was sworn in as Oakland's new leader on January 5th, 2015. After she won decisively in the November election, we wanted to learn more about the former city councilwoman. She came into the KALW studios to talk about everything from leadership style, balancing family life with running a city, and what makes Oakland unique. 

Remembering the Millions March

Dec 29, 2014
Darren Miller

On December 13th, thousands of people came together in Oakland as part of a national movement against police brutality. KALW producer Daniel Moore and photographer Darren Miller were there and made this audio slideshow to recognize the event.

On the December 18th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with activists about how this movement is organizing for lasting change. Last weekend, tens of thousands of people across the country marched to protest the shooting of black men. BlackLivesMatter is also receiving international attention and support. What is the end goal of this movement? And what will it take to get there? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

How the biggest storm in years affected the Bay

Dec 11, 2014
Ben Trefny


Today’s storm disrupted lives up and down the Bay Area, knocking down trees, flooding roadways, and cutting power to tens of thousands of people.

Alex Handy

Lots of people talk about how addicted we are to our screens. We spend our days staring at smartphones, tablets, and computers. But the first digital addiction came before most of us even imagined a home computer: video games. 

Courtesy of oaklandnorth.net

Antwan Wilson is the new head of Oakland Unified School District. Wilson spent five years as Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Denver before coming to Oakland schools last July. He arrived with a reputation for turning things around.

Living in a multi-cultural city yields all sorts of surprises. On a corner in Oakland just east of Lake Merritt, a small Buddha has helped bring neighbors together.

Flickr user Jill Karjian

 

Mayor Jean Quan is the incumbent in the race, and she's been making the case for Oakland to give her a second term. But in the past four years, her leadership of the city has received mixed reviews. She has been criticized for her crackdown of the Occupy encampment. She has also been taken to task for troubles in the controversial Oakland Police Department, which has had a federal monitor and rapid turn-over at the top. But Quan says the city is better off than it was four years ago. She says violent crime is down and the city is finally on the right track.

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