Oakland

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

Paul Brekke-Miesner

The Bay Area was well represented in Super Bowl XLIX. The MVP, Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady, is from San Mateo. His favorite target, Julian Edelmen, is from Redwood City. And the man who could have won the game for the Seahawks, running back Marshawn Lynch, went to high school at Oakland Tech. In fact, Oakland has an especially rich history of athletes making it to the pros.

Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Legislators Draft Bills to Curb Use of Psych Meds on Foster Kids // KQED

"Almost one in four teenagers living in foster care in California is prescribed some type of psychotropic medication, found an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News. And of those teens, 60 percent are being prescribed anti-psychotics.

Ol' Silver Tongue live on Fog City Blues tonight

Feb 4, 2015

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

Jeremy Dalmas

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Nellie Large

Seafarers, from fisherman to explorers, have been coming to Bay Area ports for centuries. Maritime historian Lincoln Paine says our relationship with the ocean has been instrumental in shaping not only the history of the Bay Area, but of the entire world. His latest book, Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World, charts 3,500 years of maritime commerce and discovery. KALW's Hana Baba spoke with him about the importance of the sea and its formative role in creating the bustling cities surrounding the Bay.

 

Libby Schaaf was sworn in as Oakland's new leader on January 5th, 2015. After she won decisively in the November election, we wanted to learn more about the former city councilwoman. She came into the KALW studios to talk about everything from leadership style, balancing family life with running a city, and what makes Oakland unique. 

Remembering the Millions March

Dec 29, 2014
Darren Miller

On December 13th, thousands of people came together in Oakland as part of a national movement against police brutality. KALW producer Daniel Moore and photographer Darren Miller were there and made this audio slideshow to recognize the event.

On the December 18th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with activists about how this movement is organizing for lasting change. Last weekend, tens of thousands of people across the country marched to protest the shooting of black men. BlackLivesMatter is also receiving international attention and support. What is the end goal of this movement? And what will it take to get there? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

How the biggest storm in years affected the Bay

Dec 11, 2014
Ben Trefny


Today’s storm disrupted lives up and down the Bay Area, knocking down trees, flooding roadways, and cutting power to tens of thousands of people.

Alex Handy

Lots of people talk about how addicted we are to our screens. We spend our days staring at smartphones, tablets, and computers. But the first digital addiction came before most of us even imagined a home computer: video games. 

Courtesy of oaklandnorth.net

Antwan Wilson is the new head of Oakland Unified School District. Wilson spent five years as Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Denver before coming to Oakland schools last July. He arrived with a reputation for turning things around.

Living in a multi-cultural city yields all sorts of surprises. On a corner in Oakland just east of Lake Merritt, a small Buddha has helped bring neighbors together.

Flickr user Jill Karjian

 

Mayor Jean Quan is the incumbent in the race, and she's been making the case for Oakland to give her a second term. But in the past four years, her leadership of the city has received mixed reviews. She has been criticized for her crackdown of the Occupy encampment. She has also been taken to task for troubles in the controversial Oakland Police Department, which has had a federal monitor and rapid turn-over at the top. But Quan says the city is better off than it was four years ago. She says violent crime is down and the city is finally on the right track.

Ben Trefny

Peter Liu says he’s "the world's smartest leader" and that he has developed a plan in which every Oaklander will have a chance to make a lot of money.

Julie Caine

 

It’s time to hear from another candidate in the Oakland Mayoral Race, Patrick McCullough, who first gained public notoriety back in 2005 after he shot and wounded a teenager in the driveway of his North Oakland home. McCullough says the shooting was an act of self-defense necessary in a neighborhood plagued by crime and intimidation. KALW’s Julie Caine visited McCullough at home to talk about his vision for public safety in Oakland.

http://bryanparker.org/

 

Bryan Parker is a healthcare and tech executive with degrees from University of California Berkeley and NYU. Though he has never held elected office, he is a former chair of Oakland’s Workforce Investment Board and he is currently serving as a Commissioner for the Port of Oakland. He was appointed to that position by current Mayor Jean Quan. He made news earlier this year with a very successful crowdfunding campaign, and is a supporter of the alternative internet currency Bitcoin.

joetuman.com

On November 4th, Oakland voters will pick their next mayor. All month on “Crosscurrents,” we are going to bring you the voices of each of the 15 people who are campaigning for the job.

Joe Tuman is a self-described outsider to Oakland city government. He’s been a member of politically-focused Oakland organizations – including one that kept tabs on local public safety funding from Measure Y – but he’s never held political office. Instead, he’s spent nearly three decades teaching government and law at San Francisco State. And he’s competed in thirteen Ironman triathalons.

Today on Crosscurrents, we hear from the retired Charles Ray Williams, an ex Navy man who completed four tours in Vietnam. Williams has spent a lot of time on the road and overseas, and it's his worldliness and street education that he sees as setting him apart from other candidates. He has never held public office.

The issues Williams feels strongest about are city safety, the Oakland budget, services for the homeless, making school uniforms mandatory, and creating more afterschool programs for kids. 

Allen Temple Arms, East Oakland

 

Mary Butler is a person who "likes to keep very busy and independent."

She worked as a respiratory nurse for most of her adult life. After retiring in the early 2000s, she supported herself the way retirees are meant to: with a small pension and social security. She moved to Las Vegas for a while to take care of an ill sibling. When she moved back to Oakland, she couldn’t find a place to rent. Her retirement funds didn’t stack up.

Sukey Lewis

We all throw stuff away—about four and a half pounds of garbage a day, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

We’ve gotten used to hearing the three commandments of waste management: recycle, reduce, and reuse. But recently, the term “up-cycle” has come into vogue. That’s the idea that you can take waste materials and turn them into something valuable and even beautiful.

Mosaic artist Daud Abdullah up-cycles pieces of trashed pottery, tile, mirror, and glass to make public art on garbage cans in Oakland and Richmond.

Under CC license from Flickr user Patrick

A majority of Americans say their biggest financial concern is that they won’t be able to save enough money to retire. This finding, by a recent Gallup poll, is likely one reason that the average age of retirement in America has increased from 60 to 62 years old since the 2008 recession. For many people, though, retiring in their 60s simply isn’t possible.

Audrey Dilling

At the end of a narrow alley off of International Boulevard, through the open doorway of El ColectíVelo bike shop, I’m greeted by a young boy.

“R.B.! It’s the lady here for you!” he shouts.

“R.B.” are initials I’ll hear shouted out a lot of today. They stand for Reggie Burnett. He’s the leader here.

Julie Caine

 


    

KALW's Hear Here community storytelling team met one Oakland resident who lost her job, but found a new way to feed herself.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Hoodslam

Aug 22, 2014
Zach Mack

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

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