obesity

Your Call: How are urban farms changing cities?

Jun 17, 2015

  

On the June 17th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about urban agriculture. Eighty percent of the US population lives in cities, further from farms than ever, but more and more city dwellers are growing their own food on empty lots or in their backyards. The film Growing Cities examines this trend from the Bay Area to Detroit.  How are urban farms revitalizing communities and changing the way we eat? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

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Your Call: What's causing early puberty in girls?

Jun 4, 2015

On the June 4th edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about why girls are entering puberty earlier than ever before? We’ll talk with Doctors Louise Greenspan and Julianna Deardorff, authors of The New Puberty: How to Navigate Early Development in Today's Girls. Just a generation ago, fewer than 5 percent of girls started puberty before the age of 8; today that percentage has more than doubled.  Why is this happening, and what can we do to help girls through this major transition? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

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Here in America, close to 70 percent of people are overweight. In her new book XL Love: How the Obesity Crisis is Complicating America’s Love Life, local journalist Sarah Varney looks beyond the numbers to explore how issues of weight can do everything from end marriages to over-sexualize girls as young as nine years old. Varney sat down with KALW's Hana Baba to talk about the the threat obesity poses to not just our health, but to our happiness.

  

On today's next your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Dr Deborah Cohen author of A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind the Obesity Epidemic — and How We Can End It. Two out of every three adult Americans are either overweight or obese. How can we reshape our modern food culture? What role should the government play in changing the food environment? Join the conversation and call in with your questions on Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

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As controversy rages regarding the government's right to regulate health, some have been quick to compare the ideas of government regulation to preventing obesity, to legislation against lung cancer and smoking. While  obesity and lung cancer are both health issues, research shows that they aren't as analogous as one might expect. Men who smoke a pack  of cigarettes per day have a relative risk of mortality nearly four times higher than the national average. The relative risk of mortality from obesity isn't even close to that; it's 1.5 times the average.

Marcy Berry is the Vice Chair of the Libertarian Party of San Francisco. She spoke with KALW’s Isaac Silk about whether the government should be involved with legislating healthy lifestyles.

MARCY BERRY: No. Not at all, no at all times, no. It should be left up to parents to families to the people in charge. It’s not, in my opinion, up to the government to address such things.  So, say if someone is obese, why is that person obese? She shouldn’t eat that much. I have children; they’re not obese. So, I don’t expect the government to make them thin. I expect myself to guide them

newamericamedia.org

Sixteen percent of people in Richmond live below the poverty line. The city has the highest rate of diabetes deaths in Contra Costa County. But it also has one of the nation’s most progressive mayors, Mayor Gayle McLaughlin.

 On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Raj Patel, author of “Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World food System" and Daniel Imhoff, author of "Food Fight: The Citizen’s Guide to  Food and Farm Bill.”  The US Farm Bill is currently being discussed by the Senate.   How does the Farm Bill affect our food system?  Who is behind crop subsidies?  Why does it matter for the environment, the economy, and public health?  Join us at 10 PST or leave a comment here.  What do you want to know about the Food and Farm Bill?  It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Dr. John McDougall about his new book, "The Starch Solution." According to Center for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults and approximately 12.5 million of children and adolescents are obese.  We've heard about proper nutrition, so why don't we practice it? Dr. McDougal says eat your carbs--starch is the solution to the obesity crisis plaguing this nation. Can starch help heal the health crisis? Join us live at 10 or send an email to feedback@yourcallradio.org. It's Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

(San Bernadino County Sun) // Thirteen Cal State students are planning a hunger strike for Wednesday, which they say they will continue until university administrators agree to meet with them and consider their demands. Those demands include a five-year moratorium on student fee increases, eliminating housing and car allowances, lowering administration and executive salaries, and removing restrictions to free speech on campus…

The practice of fracking on oil wells near Taft, California has been approved by the state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources. Fracking – the practice of injecting steam underground at high pressure to break up porous soil to release oil – had been banned within 150 feet of any wells known to be seeping oil...

PG&E insists that its current rates are reasonable despite the fact that the price of natural gas has dropped. Consumer advocates point out that PG&E should pass its savings onto customers and not use it for other sectors of the company budget...

A Shadow Of Acceptance: Growing Up Overweight

Feb 6, 2012
Photo courtesy of Turnstyle News

By: Derek Williams

I’m so bowlegged that my older brother says I look like I’ve been riding a bull since the day I was born. I stand five foot seven and weigh 380 pounds.

Some days when my knees are giving me a lot of pain I’ll look over at my shadow doing a slow pigeon toed wobble down the street, and I just think to myself how gross and unhealthy I look.