Image by Flickr user Daniel Arauz, with Creative Commons license. This photo was resized and cropped.


EDITOR'S NOTE: A previous version of this article contained errors that have been corrected, below:

* We stated that Brian Hofer had been working for a decade to scale back Oakland's Domain Awareness Center (DAC). The public became aware of the DAC in 2013, and Hofer began his work on the DAC in January of 2014.

Sam Levin

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco mayor blocks bike yield law with veto threat // San Jose Mercury News

“Mayor Ed Lee slammed the brakes on legislation that would allow bicyclists to treat stop signs like yield signs, saying he would veto the ordinance if it reached his desk.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 5th

Mar 5, 2015
Laura Wenus

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Kyung Jin Lee / KALW

After years of struggle, the Oakland Police Department is finally getting some positive news. Crime rates are down in all major categories, including murder, robberies, and burglaries. And they’re getting closer than ever to meeting federally mandated reforms from more than a decade ago.

Kyung Jin Lee

Oakland Police Department

Oakland Police Captain Ricardo Orozco says he’s living his dream of being a cop.

“Ever since I was a small boy, the show that I always liked to watch was Adam 12,” he says, referring to a TV show featuring LAPD officers.

These days, living the dream means managing a cadre of officers in the central part of Oakland. As of June, the city is broken up into five regions, each led by an area commander. A 26-year veteran of the force, Orozco heads Area 3, which includes some of the city’s most expensive zip codes, as well as some of its lower-income ones.

For the better part of two decades, Oakland residents have often objected to the city's process for taking complaints about police officers. Under the city's system, residents who want to make a complaint against a particular officer must make that complaint to a uniformed cop working for OPD's Internal Affairs Division. For some, the setup was intimidating, and it also bred cynicism because internal affairs routinely dismissed most of the complaints.

Today on Your Call: What is good policing?

Sep 4, 2013

Under CC license from Flickr user allaboutgeorge

The top brass of the Oakland Police department looks a lot different than it did a month ago. In just one week in May, two police chiefs resigned: former chief Howard Jordan, then his successor, Anthony Toribio.

The departures followed several highly critical reports: one by an independent consultant, the other by the department’s court-appointed overseer. Both find that years after the landmark police abuse scandal known as the Riders case, the department is still struggling with leadership, accountability, and transparency.

East Bay Express: Throwing more money at police

May 29, 2013

Oakland already directs a larger percentage of its budget to police than comparable cities nationwide, yet it's planning to spend even more money without demanding reforms.

Flickr user katastrophik

A couple of years ago, Sonny Le and his five-year-old son were approaching their front gate in Oakland’s Glenview neighborhood after school when Le saw two men running towards them.

“One was trying to go behind us – the maneuver trying to corral your prey, basically,” he says. “The other one started coming right at me, at us. He put his hoodie on. It was like, OK, these kids gonna rob us.”

Ali Winston

Of the 2,000 people who initially applied for the 55 new positions on the Oakland Police force, most were from outside the city. In fact, more than 90% of the current police force does not live in Oakland, something that activists say strains community police relations and affects city resources. Oakland spends about 40% of its general fund on police – that compares with 26% spent on police in San Jose, 17% in Sacramento and 7% in Long Beach. 

Kyung Jin Lee

When the Oakland Police Department put out a call for new recruits earlier this year, more than 2,000 people applied – mostly from outside of Oakland. The applicants live in cities in the outer East Bay and in San Francisco, but they also hail from as far away as Illinois and Florida.