parole

How can someone who murders re-enter society?

Dec 26, 2012

A conversation with Nancy Mullane, author of Life After Murder: Five Men in Search of Redemption.  We’ll also speak with Jesse Reed, one of the men she profiles in her book.  The California state parole board only approved parole for 10 percent of murder cases last year.  Governor Jerry Brown then approved 80% of those.  So what does it take to be released?  And how should those who have killed re-integrate in society?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

New legislation has reached the Governor’s desk that would change the way juveniles are sentenced. Senate Bill SB9, introduced by State Senator Leland Yee of San Francisco introduced the legislation ,which would allow people who are serving life without parole for crimes they committed when they were juveniles, to ask for sentences of 25 years to life instead.

On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Nancy Mullane, author of Life After Murder: Five Men in Search of Redemption.  We’ll also speak with Jesse Reed, one of the men she profiles in her book.  The California state parole board only approved parole for 10 percent of murder cases last year.  Governor Jerry Brown then approved 80% of those.  So what does it take to be released?  And how should those who have killed re-integrate in society? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kern

Courtesy of Flickr user Shawn Thorpe.

This week, US Supreme Court took up the issue of life without parole for juvenile offenders. The question for the justices is whether children who commit murder should have the chance at some point in their lives to prove they should be let free.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user MikeCogh/http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/5997920696/

A life sentence with the possibility of parole is one of the only sentences in California designed to encourage the convicted to reform. Lindsey Bolar, who served 23 years in prison before receiving parole, believes “lifers make up your best population in prison.” After serving between 20 and 25 years, Bolar says, “you know that the mad stupid stuff doesn’t go anymore, then all of a sudden you are trying to find a meaning for your life and you want to go home.”

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