Cal Tabuena-Frolli

In 2014, a small press published an anthology of poetry called “It’s Night in San Francisco but it’s Sunny in Oakland.” It is a collective memory of the winter of 2011, Oscar Grant Plaza, Oakland: the site of the encampments and acts of resistance staked in solidarity with Occupy Wall street.


Liza Veale looked at this anthology to see how poets captured the spirit of Occupy. Here’s what it sounds like in the language of poetry.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

Martina Castro took a walk around the Mission with San Francisco’s poet laureate Alejandro Murguía to hear about what the neighborhood used to be like when he first moved here, back in the 1970s - and what’s changed.


Jeremy Dalmas


In a quiet spot, just west of the bustle of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, sits a garden dedicated to English literature’s crowned prince: William Shakespeare. Once you make it past the entrance gate and down the worn brick path, you are transported into an English garden filled with manicured flower beds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city.

Tonny Villarreal

Note: This article contains language some readers may find offensive.

Usually, people who emerge from the 16th Street BART Station in San Francisco are greeted by men and women slumped over shopping carts, by panhandlers, and by the cacophony of traffic. But late on Thursday nights, BART passengers stride into the sounds of poetry. For over a decade, poets, musicians, and comedians have been meeting outside the station.