Politics

Political news

  

As long as there has been fascism, there has been anti-fascism — also known as antifa.

© 2016 Khaled Abdullah / Reuters

Last weekend, Mohamad Bin Salman, the Saudi Crown Prince and the architect of the devastating war in Yemen, ordered the arrests of some of the country’s top political and business elites. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the ongoing crackdowns in Saudi Arabia.

©2017 LALO ALCARAZ / CARTOON APPEARS COURTESY OF LALO ALCARAZ / http://www.pocho.com/

  It's been almost a year since Donald Trump was elected president, and on issues from immigration to climate change, California's been putting up a fight. Host Joseph Pace and guests look at how our state has been influencing national law and policy, the limits of resistance, and the future of California's relationship with Washington.

Guests:

-Carla Marinucci, California Playbook reporter, Politico; former senior political writer, San Francisco Chronicle

-Joe Eskenazi, editor-at-large, San Francisco Magazine; columnist, Mission Local

This week, former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates were indicted on a long list of crimes, including money laundering. Earlier this month, Donald Trump’s foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the investigation into Russian meddling in the election.

Over the past 50 years, Americans have become more and more sick, unhappy, and broken. In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains, Dr. Robert Lusting argues that corporations are maximizing profits by exploiting  our brain physiology and chemistry to conflate pleasure with happiness.

Credit: Alaa Al-Marjani/Reuters


On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll talk about the fall of Kirkuk with the Guardian’s Martin Chulov. Three weeks after the Kurdish referendum for independence, the Iraqi military and Iranian backed Shiite militias took over the Kurdish held city of Kirkuk. What’s next?

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with Juan Gonzalez, co-host of Democracy Now! about his new book Reclaiming Gotham: Bill de Blasio and the Movement to End America’s Tale of Two Cities.

FABRIZIO BENSCH / REUTERS

  On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss Germany’s election results. For the first time in Germany's postwar history, a far-right party managed to enter Parliament. The anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party won 12.6% of the vote.

Keith Allison, Hanover, MD / Wikimedia Commons

 

The Golden State Warriors made a political statement over the weekend, when superstar Steph Curry said he wouldn’t join a celebration at the White House if the team received the traditional championship invitation.

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the deadly earthquake in Mexico, which killed more than 225 people, including at least 25 children at a school in Mexico City.

 In her new book Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, historian Nancy MacLean tells the story of the Nobel Prize-winning political economist James McGill Buchanan who played a key role in the rise of the radical right.

Aidan Wakely-Mulroney / Creative Commons Flickr

 

State legislators put in a 48-hour marathon session before going on recess, passing hundreds of bills on to Governor Brown who must pass or veto them by October 15.

June marked the 50th anniversary of the occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and East Jerusalem. After visiting the occupied territories, renowned novelists and essayists Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman marked the anniversary by inviting international writers to bear witness to the human cost of the occupation and share their experiences.

Why do young people join ISIS and Al-Qaida? In her new book I Was Told to Come Alone: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad, Washington Post national security correspondent Souad Mekhennet provides on-the-ground reporting on the rise of Al-Qaida, ISIS, and their victims. 

Photo Courtesy: Heather Heyer's facebook page


Three weeks after the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, how are residents coping?

Do we really need to be governed by a formal state, or is that merely something the state has convinced us we need?

Photo Courtesy: fpafoundation.org

  

Half a million children live in foster care in the US. More than 100,000 are waiting to be adopted. The good news is that attitudes toward foster children are changing. Growing numbers of people who want to adopt say they’d consider adopting a foster child, according to a survey conducted for the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption.

Your Call: How should we talk about race and class in the Trump era?

Aug 27, 2017

  

In the wake of the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville and this weekend’s events in the Bay Area, we are having a much-needed conversation about race in this country.

This week, Donald Trump unveiled plans to expand US military intervention in Afghanistan by sending up to 4,000 more soldiers to the region. How are the media covering the 16-year US invasion and its impacts on the civilian population?

  

What’s the best response to this weekend’s rallies in San Francisco and Berkeley, which are expected to attract white supremacists and armed militia groups?

  

While Donald Trump’s outrageous tweets and speeches make headline news, his administration is fundamentally reshaping US health, safety, and environmental rules. A New York Times series explores the “reshaping of regulations under the Trump administration.” Every week, Politico reports on “5 things Trump did while you weren’t looking.”

Michael Vadon/Creative Commons license

Monday at 6pm Pacific Time, KALW will broadcast NPR's special coverage of President Trump's address on "the path forward" in Afghanistan.  Follow fact-checks and real-time analysis from NPR journalists here.

Your Call Weekly Kudos: August 18th, 2017

Aug 18, 2017

 

Rose Aguilar and her guests discuss journalism that stood out this week.

 

Guests:

 

A.C. Thompson, award winning investigative reporter with ProPublica, covering the rise in hate crimes in the US for the Documenting Hate project

Sarah Posner, reporter with the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute, author of God's Profits: Faith, Fraud, and the Republican Crusade for Values Voters, and an expert on the intersection of religion and politics

The horrific stories and images coming out of Charlottesville have sparked widespread outrage and international media coverage. Last week, we saw white supremacists groups carrying torches, guns, confederate flags, and Nazi paraphernalia.

Ahmad Al-Ba

June marked the 50th anniversary of the occupation of the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. After visiting the occupied territories, renowned novelists and essayists Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman marked the anniversary by inviting international writers to bear witness to the human cost the Israeli occupation.

CNN

Venezuela is dealing with the world’s highest inflation, severe food shortages, high crime, and political repression. Venezuela is also home to the world’s largest oil reserves. So what explains the political and economic turmoil?

Mike Gonzalez, author of Hugo Chavez, argues that as President Nicolas Maduro’s anti-democratic government battles violent right-wing forces, ordinary Venezuelans are watching the gains of Chavismo slip away. 

Guests:

On Saturday, hundreds of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and members of the Ku Klux Klan marched in Charlottesville, Virginia. They came with guns, shields and clubs, Nazi-style helmets, confederate flags, and Nazi paraphernalia. 

MAXX-STUDIO

This week, several media outlets have reported on the Sinclair Broadcast Group’s $3.9 billion bid for Tribune media. The deal would allow Sinclair to reach 72 percent of US households.

Your Call: Dental inequality in the US

Aug 7, 2017

Over 100 million Americans have no dental insurance -- and that number could grow if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. In her new book Teeth, veteran health journalist Mary Otto takes readers on a disturbing journey into America’s silent epidemic of oral disease.

  

Native Americans who opposed the Dakota Access Oil Pipeline were subjected to tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets, and strip searches. The Intercept reports that they were also heavily surveilled.

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