Politics

12:00am

Thu May 21, 2015
Politics

Your Call: Ralph Nader on citizen power and what it takes to spark action

  

On the May 21st edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with citizen advocate and former Presidential candidate Ralph Nader about his latest book Return to Sender: Unanswered Letters to the President, 2001-2015. Over the past decade, Nader wrote 100 letters to presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama about everything from tax cuts to US foreign policy.  He never received a response. In the 60s and 70s, letters to Presidents received media attention and sparked change. What sparks change today? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

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8:24pm

Wed May 20, 2015
Politics

The problem with "sounding white"

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

We are always adjusting the way we sound. It especially depends on the social situation we are in. Linguists call it "code switching," a term originally used for people who would switch between two different languages like Spanish and English. But the term has evolved to embrace the tone, accents, and inflections that we use when talking to people. Many of us do it.

Growing up, I heard plenty of jokes about the way I spoke. But I couldn't help the way I sounded. It’s a default voice, just how I speak. You see where I grew up, in Las Vegas, there were two types of black kids in school: those who hung out only with other black kids and those who bounced back and forth between black and non-black friends. I was in the second group. With all of that switching back and forth, my voice switched too. And it still does. For example, when I’m on the phone with my sister, the “sistah” comes out. It's not something I’m always conscious of. Sometimes it just sort of happens.

Now as an adult I have fun with it, but as a kid it wasn’t always this way. Finding my voice was just painful. At school, being told I “sounded white” meant only one thing. I wouldn’t be eating my corndog and tater tots at the black kids’ lunch table.

But that was then. Nowadays, in some schools, corn dogs and tater tots have been replaced with tofu dogs and green salad. It got me wondering if the conversation among teens may have changed too. So, I went to a place where I thought I might find some black teens who’ve been accused of “talking white”: the skate park.

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11:29am

Fri May 15, 2015
Politics

Your Call Weekly Kudos: May 15, 2015

Every week on Your Call's Friday Media Roundtable, we ask the journalists on our panel to recommend great reporting they've seen this week.

Joining us this week:

Guests:

 Andrew Cockburn, Washington editor of Harper's magazine, author of Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins 

  

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10:50pm

Thu May 14, 2015
Politics

Your Call: What's driving the Obama administration's drone policy?

On the May 15th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Andrew Cockburn, Washington editor for Harper’s Magazine about his new book Kill Chain: The Rise Of The High-Tech Assassins.  The book traces the genesis and the rise of drone warfare, including the U.S. “targeted killing” program. According to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, more than 2000 people have been killed by US drone strikes since President Barack Obama took office in 2009, at least 314 have been civilians. What are the ethical and legal implications of Drone warfare?

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12:00am

Thu May 14, 2015
Politics

Your Call: What are the untold stories behind the women’s movement?

Photo credit: Virginia Blaisdell

On the May 14th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry, a new documentary that resurrects the hidden history of the women who founded the modern women’s movement. The film tells the stories of activists, students, artists, and intellectuals at the center of the movement, which brought about a social revolution in the US. What can we learn from the past? And what’s the state of women’s liberation today? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

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