politics

Khizr Khan did something few have been able to do in this bitter and vulgar election.

Whether or not Trump makes it to the White House he's already proving very useful to those who were until dismissed as the fringe.

Philosophy Talk asks about Identity Politics

Jul 15, 2016

Is Identity politics the problem or the solution to what divides us? 


Philosophy Talk asks about Radical Democracy

Jul 1, 2016

How cam we create a democracy that doesn't end up oppressing minorities and dissenters?


How much are we getting for our military spending...and more to the point, what are we losing?

 


Californians waited a long time to see if their votes would make a difference in the presidential race, and they nearly made it to the finish line.

Courtesy of Wear Your Voice

For Ravneet Vohra, founder of Oakland-based magazine Wear Your Voice, getting dressed is more than a matter of clothes — it’s an act of reclaiming identity. Vohra was sexually abused as a young child, and after years of feeling disempowered, she’s now on a mission to break the silence around the many things we keep hush. KALW's Hana Baba sat down with Vohra to learn more.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Mar 1, 2016
By Flckr user Jason / Used under CC / Resized and Cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco deputies to face charges over alleged inmate fights // SF Chronicle

“Two San Francisco sheriff’s deputies and one former deputy who were accused of forcing city jail inmates to fight each other for entertainment will be charged criminally, The Chronicle has learned.

Courtesy of David Yu from Flickr, used under CC / Resized and cropped

San Francisco is spending more than $4.8 million to cover the costs of transit issues, law enforcement, and other expenses that go with hosting Super Bowl parties and associated activities. Why didn't city officials arrange for that money to be reimbursed?

Philosophy Talk asks about Nations and Borders

Jan 22, 2016

Are borders essential to nationhood, or do they form an exclusive club that unfairly keeps certain people from pursuing a better life? 

Jeremy Dalmas

One year into her term as mayor of Oakland, Libby Schaaf speaks with KALW's Ben Trefny about the city's affordability crisis, the rising tech industry, public safety, education, police training and what will happen with the Raiders and the A's.

Philosophy Talk examines the year that was 2015

Jan 1, 2016

What happened in 2015 that challenged our assumptions and made us think in new ways?


Tune in to hear the 2015-2016 New Year's edition of Politics Takes a Holiday from The Capitol Steps.  You'll have two chances to catch it on KALW:  Thursday, December 31st at 1pm and New Year's Day at 11am.  

Flickr user Vox Efx, used under Creative Commons. Cropped for size.

 


Several candidates are on the ballot of this year's San Francisco election. In such a case, how does the city guarantee that someone actually wins the race, when the vote is split so many ways?

 

Just northeast of Lake Merritt, across the 580 freeway, you really can’t miss it. It's big, it's public, it often contains inflammatory messages, and it's neon. 

Philosophy Talk asks about the changing face of feminism

Sep 20, 2015

What are the basic tenets of the most recent wave of feminism, and how does it differ from the previous waves?


This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Philosophy Talk asks: Should satire have its limits?

Jul 24, 2015

Are there topics we should never satirize? Is there a well-defined line between satire and hate speech? 

Are you a tax-raising, soy latte-drinking, Prius-driving, New York Times-reading, Daily Show-watching, corporation-hating liberal? Or a gun-toting, Bible-loving, Walmart-shopping, homophobic, climate-change-denying, immigrant-hating conservative? Why does it seem like all of American politics often boils down to these two absurd positions? Is it because of our particular political system, our culture, or deeper psychological impulses?

The ideal of science is objectivity in the service of advancing knowledge. We tend to assume that to be objective, scientists must keep their politics from influencing their work. But time and time again we see that science, even some of our best science, is awash in political influences. Could politics sometimes have a positive effect on objectivity in science? If so, which kinds of politics might have a positive effect and which might not? What criteria could we use to make the distinction? And does 'objectivity' still have meaning in this context?

Whether it's making donations and signing petitions online, or using social media to highlight political causes, cyber-activism has never been easier. With a few clicks, we can make our voices heard around the globe. But who's listening, and is anything actually changing? Does cyber-activism mobilize real-world action on the ground, or does it reduce political engagement to simple mouse-clicking and ultimately threaten the subversive nature of change?

Whether it's making donations and signing petitions online, or using social media to highlight political causes, cyber-activism has never been easier. With a few clicks, we can make our voices heard around the globe. But who's listening, and is anything actually changing? Does cyber-activism mobilize real-world action on the ground, or does it reduce political engagement to simple mouse-clicking and ultimately threaten the subversive nature of change?

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Philosophy Talk asks: Is hypocrisy a vice or a virtue?

Nov 28, 2014

Hypocrites believe one thing, but do another. Jefferson opposed slavery, but owned slaves. Jesus professed universal love, but cursed an innocent fig tree. Jerry Brown opposes the death penalty, but as governor of California will be responsible for executions. Hypocrites all – but vile hypocrites? Surely it was better that Jefferson was a hypocrite, and articulated the case against slavery, than not opposing it at all. Does it take courage to defend a view that you, yourself, don't have the courage or the character to follow through on?

City Visions: Pre-Election Special 2014

Oct 28, 2014

Bay Area voters head to the polls tomorrow to consider measures addressing water shortages, housing costs, sugary beverage consumption, clogged streets, and artificial turf battles in Golden Gate Park. And they'll decide on San Francisco's next assemblymember and Oakland's next mayor. Host Joseph Pace takes up these issues and more with USF politics professor Corey Cook.

Guest:  Corey Cook, Associate Professor of politics, University of San Francisco

 

Producer:  Wendy Holcombe

What Proposition 1 has in store for California's water

Oct 27, 2014
Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

Julie Caine

 

It’s time to hear from another candidate in the Oakland Mayoral Race, Patrick McCullough, who first gained public notoriety back in 2005 after he shot and wounded a teenager in the driveway of his North Oakland home. McCullough says the shooting was an act of self-defense necessary in a neighborhood plagued by crime and intimidation. KALW’s Julie Caine visited McCullough at home to talk about his vision for public safety in Oakland.

http://bryanparker.org/

 

Bryan Parker is a healthcare and tech executive with degrees from University of California Berkeley and NYU. Though he has never held elected office, he is a former chair of Oakland’s Workforce Investment Board and he is currently serving as a Commissioner for the Port of Oakland. He was appointed to that position by current Mayor Jean Quan. He made news earlier this year with a very successful crowdfunding campaign, and is a supporter of the alternative internet currency Bitcoin.

Oakland Mayoral Race '14: Candidate Joe Tuman

Oct 8, 2014
joetuman.com

On November 4th, Oakland voters will pick their next mayor. All month on “Crosscurrents,” we are going to bring you the voices of each of the 15 people who are campaigning for the job.

Joe Tuman is a self-described outsider to Oakland city government. He’s been a member of politically-focused Oakland organizations – including one that kept tabs on local public safety funding from Measure Y – but he’s never held political office. Instead, he’s spent nearly three decades teaching government and law at San Francisco State. And he’s competed in thirteen Ironman triathalons.

Today on Crosscurrents, we hear from the retired Charles Ray Williams, an ex Navy man who completed four tours in Vietnam. Williams has spent a lot of time on the road and overseas, and it's his worldliness and street education that he sees as setting him apart from other candidates. He has never held public office.

The issues Williams feels strongest about are city safety, the Oakland budget, services for the homeless, making school uniforms mandatory, and creating more afterschool programs for kids. 

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