poverty | KALW

poverty

Image via the Poor People's Campaign

 On this edition of Your Call, we speak with activists about the Poor People’s Campaign.

Photo by Axel Dupeux / Open Society Foundations

  

On this edition of Your Call, we're talking about how families are affected when their loved ones go to prison. When Issac Bailey was just nine, he saw his oldest brother taken away in handcuffs. Moochie Bailey was imprisoned for murder for 32 years. Half of the ten boys in Bailey's family eneded up in the criminal justice system.

Did you know that Richmond, Milpitas, and Palo Alto all had sub-divisions where it was illegal for African Americans to own a house? On this edition of Your Call, Richard Rothstein discusses The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which details how laws and policy decisions promoted the very discriminatory patterns that continue today.

Daniel Schwen via Wikimedia Commons

When people who commit minor crimes can't pay their fines, they often end up in jail. It's just one aspect of systemic inequality in the criminal justice system. Peter Edelman explores this racially biased system in his new book Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America.

He argues that the phrases 'school-to-prison pipeline' and 'cradle-to-prison pipeline' are too narrow. The United States has developed a criminal justice system that ensures a cradle to coffin pipeline. What's being done to change a system that traps entire communities in inescapable cycles of poverty? We'll speak with Edelman and Brendon Woods, the first African American public defender in Alameda County.

 

https://s-i.huffpost.com/gen/2288648/images/o-OM-BUILD-TINY-HOMES-facebook.jpg / Huffington Post

  

Every big city in California seems to have its own creative approach to housing the homelessness. San Jose is talking about tiny homes. Huge communal tents are being set up in San Diego. Oakland is using tuff sheds. And in San Francisco, the city’s navigation centers are meant to be a stepping stone to permanent housing. But does anyone know how to create real housing for the poor in the midst of plenty?

Guests:

Jennifer Friedenbach, executive director of San Francisco’s Coalition on Homelessness

Used Under CC by Christopher Andrews / flickr

  

The prospect of artificial intelligence and automation eliminating entire job categories has sparked a debate about a universal basic income.

This week, Donald Trump unveiled plans to expand US military intervention in Afghanistan by sending up to 4,000 more soldiers to the region. How are the media covering the 16-year US invasion and its impacts on the civilian population?

Photo by John Taylor/modified from original

When she was young Jeannette Walls wanted nothing more than to escape her crazy, chaotic family. 

Your Call: Dental inequality in the US

Aug 7, 2017

Over 100 million Americans have no dental insurance -- and that number could grow if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. In her new book Teeth, veteran health journalist Mary Otto takes readers on a disturbing journey into America’s silent epidemic of oral disease.

Your Call: The High Cost of Summer

Jun 28, 2017
Photo by flickr user amira_a

  

For many working families, summer isn’t a break at all--in fact, with school out, it can be the most difficult and expensive time of the year.

Jeremy Dalmas

Parking isn’t easy in San Francisco.

Your Call: The child care crisis in America

Apr 19, 2017


A conversation with Dr. Ajay Chaudry, a social policy analyst and co-author of Cradle to Kindergarten: A New Plan to Combat Inequality. Compared to other advanced economies, the US government invests less in children under the age of five. 

 

Why is the promise of upward mobility unattainable for so many? University of Michigan sociologist Kristin Seefeldt joins us to talk about her new book Abandoned Families: Social Isolation in the Twenty-First Century.

 

On the September 15th edition of Your Call, Ian Haney López joins us to discuss his book Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class.

Your Call: Profiting from the poor

Aug 24, 2016

On the August 25th edition of  Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Daniel Hatcher about his new book The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Jul 5, 2016
By Mark Ordonez / Flickr/cropped and resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:
 
San Francisco Considers Tax on Tech Companies to Pay for Boom’s Downside // New York Times

 

Being homeless means it's a daily challenge to get your basic needs met: eating, bathing and using the bathroom. For many women, one extra challenge arises every month when they get their period. 

When most people are on their way to sleep, San Francisco’s Homeless Outreach Team, or SF HOT, is just beginning its graveyard shift.

Julien Gregorio / Used Under CC / flickr

On the June 6th edition of Your Call, what if everyone were guaranteed a basic income? 

Matthew Desmond

On the May 13th edition of Your Call, Sociologist Matthew Desmond discusses his new book “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.” 

THE INTERSECTION: The Tenderloin's union hall

Feb 16, 2016
David Boyer

THE INTERSECTION looks at change in the Bay Area through physical intersections and street corners — where different cultures, desires and histories meet every day.

Season one focuses on Golden Gate Avenue and Leavenworth Street in the Tenderloin, a neighborhood that some feel is changing, while others feel it’s getting worse. What you’ll hear this is season is what producer David Boyer found while spending the better part a year getting to know the people who live and work nearby. This is episode three — listen to more.

Your Call: Reporting on key issues facing California

Jan 22, 2016

On the January 22nd edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of California Governor Jerry Brown’s State of the State address and his 2016-17 budget proposal.

Mark Tuschman

On the Oct 6th edition of Your Call we'll have a conversation with Mark Tuschman about his new book “Faces of Courage: Intimate Portraits of Women on the Edge.” 

  

On the May 20th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about how to get more from Social Security. The new book Get What’s Yours: The Secrets to Maxing Out Your Social Security by Laurence Kotlikoff, Philip Moeller, and Paul Solman offers strategies for how to maximize this benefit. According to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, we’re foregoing nearly $10 billion a year in Social Security spousal benefits. What do you want to know about Social Security? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

March 29 was the last night Delilah Soto slept on the street. She’s a recovering heroin addict who’s been living in a tent in San Francisco’s Mission District with her girlfriend, Rocky Anderson, and their dog Sparta. That night, she learned they had another choice.

Nearby, 1950 Mission St. was dead space. A closed-down school site sitting on premium San Francisco real estate, begging to be repurposed. On March 30, the gates opened on a new pilot program called the “Navigation Center”.

  There are billions of people across the world who are living in poverty.  And it's not uncommon for girls for in developing countries to be married off or working by the time they reach the 5th grade. But if you keep a girl in school, her income opportunities grow by 15% for each year she does stay in school. Meet the new social entrepreneurs, Leila Janah of SamaGroup and Erin Ganju of Room to Read. Breaking the cycle of poverty for millions of women. That's our next Inflection Point.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Apr 7, 2015
Bonnie Chan

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news.

 Poverty rate still near all time high in bay area // SF Biz Journal

"Not all ships have risen with the tide, especially in the Bay Area. The poverty rate in the region still hovers near its all-time high, with more than 800,000 people living below the poverty line.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Apr 2, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California Drought: Governor Orders First-Ever Water Restrictions // SFist 

The number of chronically hungry people in the world is over 800 million, yet developed countries are facing health challenges from rising rates of obesity. The growing problems of food security and water scarcity seem an issue of distribution rather than availability. But other factors also influence the status of food and water security worldwide. So where does the problem with food and water security lie? Do developed countries – or any other entities or individuals – have any moral obligations to ensure a global network of water and food security?

Global climate change confronts us not only with well-known pragmatic challenges, but also with less commonly acknowledged moral challenges. Who is responsible for responding to environmental catastrophes around the world? What kind of help does the industrialized world owe developing nations? What values should we hold onto, and which must we discard, in response to the changing climate?

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