prison

San Quentin Prison Report: Lockdown

Jul 14, 2015

A lockdown happens when correctional officers decide there is a threat to the safety and security of a prison. That might be a fight, an assault, or a race riot. 

It is exactly what it sounds like. In a lockdown, inmates have to stay in their cells until the problem is contained. They can't go anywhere unless strip-searched, handcuffed, and escorted by correctional officers.

Simron Gill

 

When it comes to locking up young people, the US leads the industrialized world. And though youth incarceration rates have been declining for the last two decades, adult prisons still contain many inmates who entered the system as juveniles with life sentences. These prisoners have grown up and lived their entire adult lives behind bars.

Lady Jay: Transgendered in prison

May 12, 2015

There are often situations in life when you might want or need a how-to manual, but none exists. One harsh example would be adjusting to life in prison. Imagine trying to do it as a transgender person. 

Your Call: How do you re-enter society after prison?

Dec 23, 2014

  On the December 23rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll hear stories of people who turned their lives around after over a decade in prison or jail.  Two thirds of people released from California's prison system will return within 3 years. What obstacles prevent people from getting out and staying out?  How does incarceration impact families, especially children?  What kind of support do formerly incarcerated adults want?  It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.  

Committed to Turning His Life Around

Nov 17, 2014

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

www.prisonerswithchildren.org

In 1969, Dorsey Nunn was sentenced to life in prison for killing a man. After serving 12 years of his sentence, Nunn was paroled in 1981. Back on the outside, he realized there was very little help for him or people like him to make new lives. He took matters into his own hands and started working with other formerly incarcerated people to address issues of employment, education, and voting rights. 

Your Call: How do you re-enter society after prison?

Oct 23, 2014
Ruth Morgan, "The Welcome Home Project"

 

  

On the October 23rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll hear stories of people who turned their lives around after over a decade in prison or jail.  Two thirds of people released from California's prison system will return within 3 years. What obstacles prevent people from getting out and staying out?  How does incarceration impact families, especially children?  What kind of support do formerly incarcerated adults want?  It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.  

Guests:

  

Father and son reunited in prison

Dec 2, 2013
Under CC license from Flickr user foreverdigital

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

Ron Everett has been incarcerated almost 31 years. Everett was arrested soon after the birth of his son, and their relationship became estranged over time.

  

Under CC license from Flickr user MaestroBen

 

Dionne Wilson's husband, a San Leandro police officer, was killed in the line of duty seven years ago, but she says it took her a long time to find a way to really heal.

“For many years, I carried around so much vengeance and hate. I realized at a certain point I had nothing left. I had no more tools. I engaged in a lot of self-destructive behavior. I tried to buy my way out of my grief; I tried to drink my way out for a short period. Thankfully, I didn’t take that too far. And I just didn’t have a way to move past being embroiled in the moment,” says Wilson.

Wilson initially thought the trial and conviction of her husband’s murderer would bring her some sort of comfort or closure.

At the Seams: Eli Conley's "folk songs for misfits"

Sep 12, 2013
Sarah Deragon


Eli Conley sings of love, prisons, coal mining, religion, homophobia and leaving Virginia on his new CD At The Seams, an album he calls "modern-day folk songs for misfits." Hear Eli's music and his chat with Out in the Bay host Eric Jansen about his life, his songwriting and how he helps other transgender singers find their voices. 

California prison hunger strike continues

Jul 25, 2013

Tensions remain high in the California prison system. A hunger strike that started two and a half weeks ago is ongoing, with more than 700 inmates in ten state prisons still refusing to eat. The strikers are demanding reforms to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s policy of keeping inmates housed in security housing units indeterminately. Supporters say more than 3,000 inmates are currently stuck in there indefinitely – many have been in the SHU for decades – because there is no clear policy on how to get out.

Today on Your Call:Friday Media Roundtable

Jul 11, 2013


Nancy Mullane

San Quentin State Prison has four massive cell blocks, each identified by their cardinal direction: north, south, east, and west. Of the four, only one houses inmates sentenced to death. None of the cell blocks have been visited by a reporter since 2007.

Nancy Mullane

This story was the first of a six-part series following Nancy Mullane in her efforts to increase media access to prisons. It first aired in October 2012. It begins seven hours north of San Francisco in Crescent City and Pelican Bay State Prison. That’s where more than 1,100 of the inmates considered the most dangerous and influential in the state are locked up in the state’s Security Housing Unit also known as the SHU.

 

As a prisoner, I am often reminded that the CDCR requires me to follow its rules. That’s understandable, rules and regulations ensure that operations run safely and smoothly. When an inmate can’t or won’t follow the rules, negative consequences are triggered to urge him or her to do so in the future. But what happens when the CDCR doesn’t follow its own rules? Where are the negative consequences to them? Apparently there are none. But there are negative consequences to inmates, and to the community, when the Department of Corrections can’t follow its own rules. Let me explain.

courtesy of lifeaftermurder.com

Between 2000 and 2009, 57,000 men and women convicted of murder were released from state and federal prison.

By the time convicted murderers are released, they’ve usually served decades behind bars; they’re a generation older than when they went to prison. When they come out, they often fade from view – no sensational headlines, no fanfare.  They make their way on the outside in a world that’s can be very different from the one they left.

How can someone who murders re-enter society?

Dec 26, 2012

A conversation with Nancy Mullane, author of Life After Murder: Five Men in Search of Redemption.  We’ll also speak with Jesse Reed, one of the men she profiles in her book.  The California state parole board only approved parole for 10 percent of murder cases last year.  Governor Jerry Brown then approved 80% of those.  So what does it take to be released?  And how should those who have killed re-integrate in society?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

September 10, 2012

Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

September 6, 2012

Okay, so I just learned that a federal court in Massachusetts has ruled that a prisoner has the right to sex-reassignment surgery. The court ruled that it was cruel and unusual punishment to deny this individual what they termed "basic medical care."

Credit Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 27, 2012

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 8, 2012

It's been slow in coming, but there have been some noticeable changes here, due to the state's realignment plan. We used to get a half-dozen big, green buses pulling in each week, disgorging thirty or forty new arrivals at a time. These days we might get one per week. Because of this, the population has decreased, reducing the number of prisoners in some dorms. 

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 8, 2012

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison. 

Schadenfreude: To take delight or pleasure in another's discomfort or pain.

With imminent budget cuts, pay decreases, and layoffs looming for the California Department of Corrections, there has been a noticeable increase in harassment and vexatious behavior by some prison guards towards prisoners under their authority.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison. 

May 25, 2012

Pages