prisons

Is increased economic opportunity the key to better relations between police and communities of color?  On the February 25th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing the connection between policing and economic opportunity.   How does the lack of opportunity drive confrontations between police and citizens – and how does our approach to crime and punishment undermine opportunity in already-challenged neighborhoods?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

On the November 6th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Bryan Stevenson, author of “Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption” and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. One in every 15 people in the United States is expected to go to jail or prison, and for  black men, the number increases to one in three. How can we generate empathy both for people who have committed crimes and compassion for victims? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest:

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Lawyers have an ethics code. Journalists have an ethics code. Architects do, too.

According to Ethical Standard 1.4 of the American Institute of Architects (AIA):  "Members should uphold human rights in all their professional endeavors." 

The Ethics of Captivity on Philosophy Talk

Aug 9, 2014

Whether it's people incarcerated in prisons, or animals confined in zoos, aquariums, laboratories, farms, and in our own homes, millions of upon millions of sentient creatures live in captivity. To be held captive, some might say, is to be denied basic rights of autonomy. But physical captivity, others might say, can have significant social benefits. So under what conditions could it be morally justified to hold a creature in captivity? Should we think of humans and animals differently? And in a civil society, is captivity a necessary harm, or should we work towards eradicating it?

At 49 years of age, Michael Santos is getting his first taste of college. He's walking through the main quad at San Francisco State, beaming like a kid.

“I always come to soak up the university vibe that I missed when I was a teenager and in my early ‘20s,” he says.

Santos is not a student or a visitor. He’s a lecturer in the Criminal Justice Department, a job he landed in September, just two weeks after his release from 26 years in prison.

Prison Life

The deadly disease lies dormant during dry summers in Central California, but it comes alive when the rains arrive in fall. Causing flu-like symptoms, it goes airborne, with spores that root in the soft tissue of your lungs. Californians have a higher chance of contracting the disease than chickenpox, hepatitis, or West Nile virus, according to the health care news organization Reporting on Health. The fungal infection known as valley fever also has a preference for people of certain ethnic backgrounds. In the prisons of California's Central Valley, about 70 percent of the victims have been African-American.

Finding work for ex-felons

Apr 4, 2013
Americaworks.com

Angel Barerra has a felony conviction. He thinks that’s kept him from finding work. In order to give people like Barerra a better chance, some California counties have implemented “Ban the Box” – they’ve made it illegal for employers to ask about felony charges on job applications.

http://californiaprisoncrisis.org/

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been bringing you exclusive stories from inside some of the state’s most secure prisons, including San Quentin. And we've been focusing on the people with the least amount of political power: the inmates. Now we turn our attention to another group within the prison system, and one with considerably more political influence: the prison guards. 

New legislation has reached the Governor’s desk that would change the way juveniles are sentenced. Senate Bill SB9, introduced by State Senator Leland Yee of San Francisco introduced the legislation ,which would allow people who are serving life without parole for crimes they committed when they were juveniles, to ask for sentences of 25 years to life instead.