protest

StoryCorps: The fight for disability rights

Jul 14, 2015

 


Protest has long been a part of Bay Area culture, from the recent Black Lives Matter marches to the AIDS activists of the '90s, to the anti-war demonstrators of the '60s and '70s.

 

 

Philosophy Talk asks: What can non-violence really achieve?

Apr 10, 2015

We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violence? Can non-violent acts be spread to stop aggression and war? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary?

Last month, the San Francisco school board unanimously agreed to expand ethnic studies courses to all San Francisco High Schools starting next fall. About 90 percent of the district is made up of people of color. Courses on ethnic identity and race-relations are currently being taught at five high schools as part of a pilot program initiated six years ago. District officials say the classes have improved the attendance and GPAS at those schools.

Remembering the Millions March

Dec 29, 2014
Darren Miller

On December 13th, thousands of people came together in Oakland as part of a national movement against police brutality. KALW producer Daniel Moore and photographer Darren Miller were there and made this audio slideshow to recognize the event.

On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

On the October 10th edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the protests in Hong Kong over China’s decision to manage Hong Kong's next chief executive election. We’ll also talk about the economics of climate change. How are greenhouse gases affecting the global economy? We’ll be joined by investigative journalist Mark Schapiro and former NPR and BBC China correspondent Mary Kay Magistad. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you

Guests:

MaydanSF

It’s been three months since violent clashes erupted in Ukraine’s capital city, Kiev. At the heart of the conflict is the Ukrainian government’s decision to abandon their EU Association Agreement. A move seen by some Ukrainian nationalists as a move to strengthen the country’s ties with former ruling power, Russia. 

Phil Ochs Tribute this Sat. 3 pm

Nov 12, 2013

Folk/gospel singers Kim & Reggie Harris will stop by the KALW studios this Sat. (Nov. 16th) at 3 pm on "Folk Music & Beyond" with Sonny Ochs,  sister of the late topical songwriter Phil Ochs.  They're in town to celebrate the 30th anniversary of "Phil Ochs Song Night."   

Kyung Jin Lee

 

Over the past few days, protesters on both sides of the Bay have joined thousands nationally in expressing outrage over George Zimmerman’s acquittal in Florida. Over the weekend, more than 500 people gathered at Oakland’s Frank Ogawa Plaza.

On today's Your Call, we’ll discuss digital activism and real-world change. Online organizing played an important role in Occupy Wall Street and the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. What do those movements tell us about digital activism and grassroots organizing?  Should people who are critical of corporate power think twice about organizing through Facebook and Twitter? And with revelations of government surveillance online, should activists change their tactics? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 Guests

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