Public Art

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Jul 23, 2015
Treasure Island Development Authority

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

City plans to transform Treasure Island with $50 million for public art // KQED

"In an art-themed version of the movie axiom, 'if you build it, they will come,' the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) hopes to draw locals and tourists alike to Treasure Island — and not just for its views.

Andy Mogg

San Francisco is a city known for a lot of things: cable cars, political activism, a vibrant arts scene. One annual event has been bringing these things together for 11 years now.

Every October, the free outdoor dance festival known as San Francisco Trolley Dances takes audiences on guided tours on public transit with live performance. It’s two days long, with six tours a day. On each tour, audiences ride the streetcars with a guide who brings them to various locations near MUNI stops.

City Visions: Coit Tower, Restored

Jul 9, 2014
Image courtesy of Architectural Resources Group

What are the stories behind the newly completed restoration of Coit Tower and its famed murals? City Visions host Joseph Pace speaks with the architect, conservator and city officials responsible for the $1.7 million project, and explores the monument’s artistic, historical and social significance in San Francisco. 


Cassandra Costello, Property Manager, San Francisco Recreation and Park Department

Tom DeCaigny, Director of Cultural Affairs, San Francisco Arts Commission

David Wessel, Principal, Architectural Resources Group

San Francisco is globally famous for being home to the iconic Golden Gate Bridge, but tonight it’s the Bay Bridge that’s making international headlines.

A new installation called “The Bay Lights” launches with 25,000 LEDs lighting up all the cables across the Western span of the Bridge, transforming it into an illuminated sculpture inspired by the surrounding environment.

Sculptor Leo Villareal is the project’s light artist, but Ben Davis is the man who came up with the idea for the installation.

Brett Amory

Time spent riding BART or Muni can be one of the least inspiring parts of a parson's day. It’s a time spent mostly waiting to be somewhere else. Commuters with headphones snaked from ear to ear, eyes focused on smartphones and iPads, or on the pages of books and newspapers. On the train, it’s sometimes too loud to talk to anyone, even when you want to.