This Saturday and Sunday, BART will stop service between West Oakland and Embarcadero stations for track repairs. For all alternate travel options for this weekend, call 5-1-1 or visit 511.org. Do not fear, we have a few unique suggestions to help you plan your weekend, which ever side of the BART tube that you find yourself.

Kevin Jones


Around 20 teenagers are settling into a classroom at this year’s Bayview Youth Summit. After a few minutes, they’re quiet, eyes focused on someone their own age, who’s leading a Race and Racism workshop.

“This is like an example of how African Americans are portrayed in the media,” says a youth moderator. “Even in Disney.”

Liz Mak

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 27, 2015

Apr 27, 2015

Meet the Misfits Behind the Last Black Man in San Francisco // Hoodline

"The title of the upcoming film The Last Black Man In San Francisco makes an obvious statement about the city losing its black population. It's down more than a third over the last two decades to just 6.3 percent, as of the 2010 census.

"But it’s also making a broader point: that with increasing uniformity in race and culture, the city could stop being a creative engine for the world."

flickr user Florida International University

In the auditorium of Willard Middle School, about 300 people have gathered, many of them sitting on those rickety school bucket chairs, the ones that make most adults hunch over awkwardly. Sitting on stage in front of a tattered green velvet curtain is an eight member panel; a combination of husbands and wives, comedians and scholars, teachers and students.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Mar 18, 2015
Carlos Avila Gonzalez / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news.

UC Berkeley black students demand fixes to 'hostile’ climate // SF GATE

"Black students at UC Berkeley often feel isolated and even oppressed, says a campus group that wants the nation’s premier public university to step up recruitment of African American students and improve support for them.

Philosophy Talk asks: Should hurtful words be forbidden?

Mar 14, 2015

Some words, like n****r, ch*nk, and c*nt, are so forbidden that we won't even spell them out here. Decent people simply don't use these words to refer to others; they are intrinsically disrespectful. But aren't words just strings of sounds or letters? Words have life because they express ideas. But in a free society, how can we prohibit the expression of ideas? How can we forbid words? Where does the strange power of curses, epithets, and scatological terms come from?


Beginning next fall, all San Francisco public schools will offer a class called Ethnic Studies. It’s a look at American history and culture from the perspective of people who aren't white. It’s also a chance to break down race in the classroom, and deal with tough concepts like unconscious racism and structural inequality.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express


On today’s episode of “Crosscurrents,” we are talking about identity. We have heard how people, whether intentionally or not, can “pass” as another race, just by the sound of their voice. Passing can also be a full-time, physical endeavor. The United States has a long history of African Americans who chose to live as white in their daily lives. 

East Bay Express

The current unrest after police shootings of unarmed black men means the battle for racial justice is far from over. Jeff Chang is a journalist, cultural critic, and the head of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford. In his new book, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, he argues that the myth of multiculturalism has in some ways silenced a real conversation about racial disparity in America. KALW’s Sandhya Dirks sat down with Chang to talk about his new book, current protests over police shootings, and how to begin a conversation about race in America today.

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

The unexamined year is not worth reviewing:

The Year in Race and Justice with Chris Lebron, Professor of African-American Studies at Yale University and author of The Color Of Our Shame: Race and Justice In Our Time

The Year in Academic Freedom with Katherine Franke, Professor of Law at Columbia University and Director of the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law

On the December 18th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with activists about how this movement is organizing for lasting change. Last weekend, tens of thousands of people across the country marched to protest the shooting of black men. BlackLivesMatter is also receiving international attention and support. What is the end goal of this movement? And what will it take to get there? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.




On the November 3rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with Jeff Chang about his latest book, "Who We Be: The Colorization of America.” He looks at how conceptions of race have changed through a lens of comic strips, contemporary art, campus protests and corporate marketing campaigns. After eras framed by words like "multicultural" and "post-racial," do we see each other any more clearly? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Stopping Workplace Harassment Because of Race, National Origin, Religion.
Guests:  Phil Horowitz, an Advisor to the Executive Committee of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the State Bar; Employment Law attorney Maribel Hernandez.
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests please call 415-841-4134.



On the October 7th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll speak with Karina Epperlein about “Finding the Gold Within,” a new documentary that focuses on six black men in a mentoring program that uses mythology and drumming as empowerment tools. Only 5.5% of college students are black men, and 46% don’t graduate from high school. What does it mean to be young, black, male and dare to step out of invisibility? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Whether for counterterrorism measures, street level crime, or immigration, racial profiling of minorities occurs frequently. However, racial profiling is illegal under many jurisdictions and many might say ineffective. Is racial profiling ever moral or is it always an unjustified form of racism? Is there any evidence that certain races or ethnic groups have a tendency to behave in particular ways? Or is racial stereotyping a result of deeply-held biases we're not even aware of?


This week on KALW's showcase for the best in public radio podcasts . . .

One with Farai "Hacking Race & Technology" Technologist Kimberly Bryant talks with Farai about why she founded the nonprofit Black Girls Code.

Philosophy Talk kicks off Black History Month

Jan 30, 2014

Dark and Beautiful

Aug 14, 2013

India’s obsession with fair skin is legendary. The matrimonial ads have their own complexion code pyramid. There’s fair and lovely at the top. Then the glowing wheatish complexion. Then medium complexion apparently unglowing. Those who don’t mention complexion at all are just assumed to be dark. You routinely hear someone described as pretty even though she’s so dark. Actress Nandita Das tells DesiYup.com that she’s used to it now.

Brett Myers


I don't know how I should feel about the George Zimmerman verdict. I was the same age as Trayvon Martin when he was killed. It was the first shooting case that got national attention where I felt connected -- like I could relate. When I first heard the story, it seemed clear: Trayvon Martin was young and he was murdered. I thought it would be an open and shut case. As time progressed, it changed. The more information came out, the more complicated the case became. And then the verdict was announced. I wasn’t surprised. But I was emotionless. Should I be angry? Should I be sad? I felt like goop. No shape. No structure.