racism

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Feb 2, 2016
By flckr user Florent Lamoureux / Used under CC BY-NC/Resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

At Berkeley, a New Digital Privacy Protest // The New York Times

“After hackers breached the computer network of the U.C.L.A. medical center last summer, Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California, and her office moved to shore up security across the university system’s 10 campuses.

On the December 11the edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of islamaphobic and xenophobic rhetoric coming from Republican presidential candidates and right wing news organizations.

Mahesh Sharma, India’s Culture minister, and a high school in Irving, Texas have more in common than they realize.

Sarah Rice / S.F. Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Evening bomb scare shuts down part of Union Square // SF Gate

 

“Part of San Francisco’s Union Square was closed to foot traffic for more than two hours Monday evening as police investigated a report of a possible explosive, authorities said. 

 

On the June 26th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss the massacre at the historic AME church in Charleston, South Carolina.

flickr user Florida International University


In the auditorium of Willard Middle School, about 300 people have gathered, many of them sitting on those rickety school bucket chairs, the ones that make most adults hunch over awkwardly. Sitting on stage in front of a tattered green velvet curtain is an eight member panel; a combination of husbands and wives, comedians and scholars, teachers and students.


 

Beginning next fall, all San Francisco public schools will offer a class called Ethnic Studies. It’s a look at American history and culture from the perspective of people who aren't white. It’s also a chance to break down race in the classroom, and deal with tough concepts like unconscious racism and structural inequality.

Liza Veale

Earlier this fall San Francisco Muni buses displayed an ad that may have upset you. Or angered you. Or made you feel threatened. The Muni ad was part of an anti-Islam campaign calling itself the American Freedom Defense Initiative, or AFDI. It wasn’t the first time AFDI’s ads ran on Muni buses and it probably won’t be the last.

On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

Your Call: How should we talk about racism?

Aug 25, 2014

On the August 26th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust, Dr. Shakti Butler about her documentary, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity. The documentary explores racism, as a dynamic system with multiple layers functioning simultaneously. So what are different forms of racism and racial inequality and how should it be confronted?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Shakti Butler, filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust

StoryCorps

After serving time in the Air Force, Nathan Baxter, an African American man from Pennsylvania, ended up in the South in the 1960s. Baxter learned a lot of lessons during and after his service – one of which was how difficult it could be to be a black man in the South at that time. He stopped by mobile Storycorps booth in Oakland to share some never-told experiences with his descendants.

  

Angered by evictions, Google buses, NSA spying and "climate change"? Eric Jansen's guest on Out in the Bay, 7pm Thursday on KALW, is Krissy Keefer, artistic director of San Francisco's all-women performance troupe Dance Brigade. The company's current production, Hemorrhage: An Ablution of Hope & Despair, uses the Mission District and its eviction epidemic as a backdrop to explore local, regional and world crises – global warming, war, genocide, attacks on women and on San Francisco’s cultural core. Hemorrhage: An Ablution of Hope & Despair, plays at Dance Mission Theater through February 8.

Miss America's not fair enough... for Indians

Sep 18, 2013

Her name is Nina Davuluri and this Indian American is the new "Miss America."  Indians are of course in a self-righteous lather about the blatant racism expressed on twitter recently, but here’s the ugly truth. Nina Davuluri can be Miss America. But she could never be Miss India. Or even Miss Indian-American Fremont. She’s just too dark



Urban Etiquette

Apr 23, 2013
Duane Hoffman/msnbc.com

  

Living with 4.5 million people in the metropolitan

Bay Area means accepting some fundamental social premises and following a few rules. But what are they, and who makes them?

What’s the difference between infringing on rights, racism, and just plain annoying behavior?

What about using cell phones in public restrooms and on BART? When doesn't 10 items or less mean 10 items or less?

And how do you break up with your hair stylist? Discussing this with host Joseph Pace are: