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racism

Photo by Axel Dupeux / Open Society Foundations

  

On this edition of Your Call, we're talking about how families are affected when their loved ones go to prison. When Issac Bailey was just nine, he saw his oldest brother taken away in handcuffs. Moochie Bailey was imprisoned for murder for 32 years. Half of the ten boys in Bailey's family eneded up in the criminal justice system.

Photo by Erik Carter

  

On this edition of Your Call, we speak with writer and Black Lives Matter activist Darnell Moore about his memoir, No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America.

Photo by Andre Chung

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Ibram X. Kendi discusses his book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. He argues that racism isn’t fading away as progress forges ahead – instead, racist ideas are evolving.

Photo courtesy of the Nation Parks/modified from original

For the past decade 96-year-old Betty Reid Soskin has served as the nation’s oldest Park Ranger 

Did you know that Richmond, Milpitas, and Palo Alto all had sub-divisions where it was illegal for African Americans to own a house? On this edition of Your Call, Richard Rothstein discusses The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which details how laws and policy decisions promoted the very discriminatory patterns that continue today.

  

The United States is more segregated than it was in the 1980s. Black and Latinx students are more likely to attend so-called majority-minority schools where 60 percent or more of students live in poverty.

  

What explains the rise of the right in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance?

Handout

 

Aeeshah Clottey grew up black in segregated Louisiana. Her journey has taken her from the black church to the Nation of Islam, living in between the painful racial divides in the country — and always trying to find ways to mend our deep social wounds.

On Saturday, hundreds of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and members of the Ku Klux Klan marched in Charlottesville, Virginia. They came with guns, shields and clubs, Nazi-style helmets, confederate flags, and Nazi paraphernalia. 

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP/modified from original

The Scripps National Spelling Bee has a new winner. 12 year old Ananya Vinay. Another Indian American. That’s not news anymore.
But Ananya Vinay’s victory made news outside the spelling beehive for a different reason.

Courtesy Virendra Singh Gosain/Hindustani Times, modified from original

There have been other mob attacks in India before three Nigerians were beaten in a mall in Delhi on March 27. Each time the government promises stringent action.

Courtesy of Flickr user "Living Off Grid"/cropped from original

Used as Indian Americans are to being heralded as the model minority, their feathers might be ruffled by the stories of harassment coming out of the US

The new documentary, The Chinese Exclusion Act, examines the 1882 law that was established after decades of anti-immigrant rhetoric and violence against Chinese immigrants.

Your Call: Refugees and the right to move

Nov 21, 2016

On the November 22nd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with University of Hawaii Geography Professor Reece Jones about his new book Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move.

Your Call: Media coverage of white supremacy

Nov 18, 2016

On the November 18th edition  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of Steve Bannon, former chief editor of the extreme right news and propaganda site, Breitbart.com -- and now Donald Trump's chief strategist.

Your Call: Another day in the death of America

Oct 3, 2016

On the October 4th edition of  Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the Guardian columnist Gary Younge about his new book Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives.

Photo courtesy of Diamond Davis

    

Football players from Mission High School in San Francisco made headlines across the country when the team, as a unit, refused to stand for the national anthem, in protest against the oppression of people of color in the U.S.

Your Call: Media coverage of race and racism

Jul 14, 2016
Photo/John Bazemore / AP

On the July 15th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the widespread protests against the killing of black men by police.

Todd Whitney

 

If you have walked the streets of the Bay Area recently -- you might have seen posters featuring the names and faces of Oscar Grant, Renisha McBride, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, among others. 

 

Yesterday afternoon protesters marched to San Francisco’s City Hall demanding an end to police brutality and rampant racial bias.

 

Indians have no reason to feel left out anymore. The Donald has noticed them and the Donald has mocked them. 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Apr 26, 2016
Flickr user Daniel ............ / used under CC license / resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

San Francisco Torn as Some See ‘Street Behavior’ Worsen // New York Times

Sandip Roy

In 1962 a group of Indians were shipped off to internment camps during a war with China. 

Jeremy Dalmas

 

Before the third meeting of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Transparency, Accountability and Fairness in Law Enforcement even began, it was easy to see evidence of the strained relationship between the San Francisco Police Department and the community they serve.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Mar 1, 2016
By Flckr user Jason / Used under CC / Resized and Cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco deputies to face charges over alleged inmate fights // SF Chronicle

“Two San Francisco sheriff’s deputies and one former deputy who were accused of forcing city jail inmates to fight each other for entertainment will be charged criminally, The Chronicle has learned.

Indian officials play 'racism dodge ball' in Bangalore.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Feb 2, 2016
By flckr user Florent Lamoureux / Used under CC BY-NC/Resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

At Berkeley, a New Digital Privacy Protest // The New York Times

“After hackers breached the computer network of the U.C.L.A. medical center last summer, Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California, and her office moved to shore up security across the university system’s 10 campuses.

On the December 11the edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of islamaphobic and xenophobic rhetoric coming from Republican presidential candidates and right wing news organizations.

Mahesh Sharma, India’s Culture minister, and a high school in Irving, Texas have more in common than they realize.

Sarah Rice / S.F. Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Evening bomb scare shuts down part of Union Square // SF Gate

 

“Part of San Francisco’s Union Square was closed to foot traffic for more than two hours Monday evening as police investigated a report of a possible explosive, authorities said. 

 

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