realignment

6:30pm

Wed August 20, 2014
OMHT

An antidote to time served: Alameda County’s Operation My Hometown

Santa Rita Jail
Credit Photo by California Energy Commission

Arthur Streeter is taking me to meet an inmate who’s going to be released from jail today.

“So we’re going to pick him up and get something to eat,” Streeter tells me, “and then we’re going to go to an emergency shelter that he’ll stay at at International and East Oakland.”

He’s talking about Hayden Hindenburg, who’s been incarcerated at Santa Rita Jail for the last six months. Streeter is the program director for Operation My Hometown, and his job is to help Hindenburg get a good start outside prison walls.

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7:00pm

Wed August 6, 2014
Cops & Courts

Reentry: Two men seek homes after prison release

Luisa Beck

A note to our readers: the names of formerly incarcerated men and their families in this story have been changed to protect their identities.

It’s hard to tell how old William Bennett and his friend John Porter are based on looks. Bennett is about six feet tall, wears a silver ear stud, and has a signature cologne: Gypsy Musk. Porter is a little shorter. He has big eyes, a small gap in his upper teeth, and a huge friendly grin. Both of them have a determined and yet playful air about them. When they show me the kitchen they share with 12 other guys, they start the kind of banter that only two trusted friends can get away with.

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12:00am

Wed November 6, 2013

3:49pm

Wed September 26, 2012
Cops & Courts

Dispatches from the Inside: Rehabilitation needs are not being met for California prisoners

Credit Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 27, 2012

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1:45pm

Tue September 11, 2012
Cops & Courts

New policy means more chances for inmates leaving prison

Imagine you’re 18 years old and you commit a crime. A robbery. You go to prison at one of the only women’s facilities in the state. You get out a year later, on parole – and you’re back in the same neighborhood where you first got in trouble. You commit another crime. And the cycle starts all over again. That’s what happened to Courtney Samson.

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