refugees

Daily News roundup for Monday, April 25, 2016

Apr 25, 2016
"Uber 4U," by Flickr user Adam Fagen. Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 / cropped and resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Can we solve the housing crisis? // Oakland Magazine

"Uber Technologies’ September purchase of the massive old Sears Building in Uptown Oakland was like the clanging of a bell announcing that the Bay Area’s tech-led economic boom was finally spilling into the East Bay."

  

On the March 11th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the Syria refugee crisis. The devastating war in Syria has created one of the worst humanitarian crisis in modern history. Eight million Syrians are internally displaced, with more than four million others in neighboring countries, and hundreds of thousand risking death to reach the Europe.With countries shutting down their borders, how are the media covering the worsening refugee crisis? Join the conversation, on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

 On the March 9th edition of Your Call, we'll examine the history of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. 

Gay and Syrian: One refugee’s journey to San Francisco

Feb 10, 2016
Eli Wirtschafter

 

Subhi Nahas remembers the exact day when he knew he’d have to leave Syria. It was the Spring of 2012. He was twenty four, on a bus, going to university take a final exam. It was the last exam he needed to graduate.

Courtesy Edward Miguel

Some scientists are saying that you can’t talk about the global refugee crisis without talking about another crisis: climate change.

Philosophy Talk examines the year that was 2015

Jan 1, 2016

What happened in 2015 that challenged our assumptions and made us think in new ways?


Manny Valdes/Flickr

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Guardian UK

We are inundated by a circus of gratuitous and salacious images in our media everyday, but one recent photograph has cut through the clutter.

Your Call Weekly Kudos: September 4th, 2015

Sep 4, 2015

Every week on Your Call's Friday Media Roundtable, we ask the journalists on our panel to recommend great reporting they've seen this week.

Navigating food in a new land

Jul 2, 2015
photo courtesy of Peralta Hacienda

It’s barely past 8 a.m. on a Wednesday morning in Oakland’s Fruitvale district, and the PeraIta Hacienda Park is already teeming with life.

http://images.politico.com/

Nor Kathem has his eye on the clock. He has set the alarm on his phone to go off when his parking meter will expire. He doesn’t want to get a parking ticket in downtown San Jose. 

Kathem has an athlete’s swagger and sense of timing. He has been a refugee in three different countries, so even though he is only 20, he knows a lot about running out of time.

Phil Pasquini

Hesham Alalusi, is an Iraqi American living in the Bay Area. He left Iraq in the 1980's and using his own funds  started the Alalusi Foundation. His foundation offers assistance to refugees trying to put their lives back together, like Ahmed Al Kubaisi, a young man who was shot in Fallujah and is now getting medical aide at a hospital here in the bay area.  Alalusi says that he's seen the difference that the organization has been able to make in refugee's lives but the devastation in his region is ongoing.

Today marks the 11th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq -- and even though the U.S. officially left the country in 2011, it's  still a country in turmoil. Just yesterday, a series of bombings claimed the lives of 16 people, just one slice of how difficult life can be there.  Millions of Iraqis have left -- many ending up in neighboring countries, or with the help of the U.N., getting refugee status in the U.S. or Europe. California is now home to the largest number of Iraqi refugees in the U.S.

Courtesy of citizensreachout.org

Today marks the tenth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. In the past decade, we have heard from people with varying perspectives on the war: politicians for and against it; anti-war activists; foreign governments; and the United Nations – and we’ve heard the stories of military veterans coming home.